(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Washington ELM"

■:■■'." ■;':■•■■.■' 
;■:■. :'■■;;■: 






;: & 



(T 




FOR 

DR. GILBERT W. MEAD 

IN APPRECIATION OF 

HIS CONTRIBUTIONS TO 

AND 

INTEREST IN 

THE WASHINGTON ELM 
1941-42 



WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF 
THE BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 



"V" 



Tfee 




"V" 



Vol. XL!. No. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE. CHESTERTOWN, MD., FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



Price Ten Cents 



Dr. Coleman And 
Dr. Kline Added 
To Faculty List 

Returning students will find 
two new faces among the facul- 
ty this year, as a result of two 
jhanges made during the sum- 
mer. Mr. Henry E. Coleman. 
Jr., of Lexington, Ky., becomes 
Head Librarian succeeding Mr. 
H. L. Roisen who has removed 
to Tulsa. Okla., and Dr. Albert 
P. Kline, of Baltimore, takes 
the place of Dr. R. M. Chat- 
■;. Assistant Professor of Bi- 
ology. 
Mr, Coleman, who has most recent- 
served as Reference Librarian at 
ie Teachers College at Bellingh;im. 
Wnsh., is a graduate of Center Col- 
lege, and holds also a Master's degree 
English from the University of 
Ninth Carolina. His library tram- 
was received at the University of 
Illinois, where he secured the B. S. in 
ary Science, and at the Univer- 
i.f Michigan, from which he se- 
ll the degree of A. M. in Library 
Administration. He was formerly 
cunnectt'd with the library of North- 
ivcstcrn University, and was Supervis- 
or of Departmental Libraries at the 
University of Iowa for two years. He 
has traveled extensively both in this 
country and abroad. 

r. Kline, who becomes Assistant 
Professor of Biology, is a Maryfifnd- 
er, a graduate of Frostburg State 
Teachers College and Western Mary- 
, and hold? the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy from the Johns Hop- 
kins University. He has studied also 
Harvard University, Boston Uni- 
versity, and Temple. He has taugrit 
in the public schools of Washington 
Cminty. and at Polytechnic Institute, 
imore, in addition to bis teaching 
ic Department of Botany at the 
Johns Hopkins University. 



Advises Freshmen , 




'^\ 




Ray Kirby 

Ray Kirby, President of the Stu- 
dent Council, has informed the Fresn- 
men of the Honor System in several 
speeches to them this week. 



Frosh Week 
In Third Day 

Freshman Week, which is now in 
ts third day, ends sometime after 
midnight Sunday night with the Ratj 
Party. Highlights of the assemblies] 
n the past two days have been talks! 
I>y A. Rayfield Kirby and Margaret 
A. Pitt, presidents of the Student 
Council and the Reid Hall Council re- 
spectively concerning student govern- 
""'nt al Washington College. 
In the form of entertainment was 
e Faculty Reception to the Fresh- 
en held in Hodson Hall on Wednes- 
evening where the new students 
; introduced to the faculty mem-; 
pers, Last night was the usual movie 
Party through the courtesy of Mana- 
ger Emerson Russell, '24. Following 
the party, refreshments were sewed 
Ihrough the courtesy of Lee ami Hen- 
V Gill. 

The highlight of today's program 
omes tonight at 7:30 in the William 
Smith auditorium where the fresh- 
ien will be introduced to the leaders 
1 the campus. (Tris program is un- 
der the direction of the Mount Ver- 
"oh Society of which Mortimer Gar- 
<' >• president. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



New System Of 
Cuts Put Into 
Immediate Use 

1. A student shall be allowed as 
many absences in any course each 
semester as there are meetings per 
week in that course. 

2. All work missed because of ab- 
sences shall be made up to the satis- 
faction of the instructor concerned. 

3. A student representing the col- 
lege in an athletic contest, confer- 
ence, or other activity approved by 
the Dean is not to be charged with an 
absence. 

4. A student who has been confin- 
ed to his room or hospital for a per- 
iod of three or more consecutive days, 
under the care of a certified physi- 
cian, shall be readmitted to all class- 
es upon presenting a statement to this 
effect from the Dean. Absences up 
to the number still to the student's 
credit are to be charged in the usual 
manner. 

5. For the first absence beyond 
the number allowed in each course 
the student will be required to pay 
a fine of two dollars and a dollar fine 
for each succeeding absence. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Unlimited Cuts 
To Be Reward 
For 2.50 Index 

Under the new system of ab 
(sences provision is made for a 
j Dean's list. Heretofore stu- 
dents achieving an index of 
j2.50 were granted an addition- 
la! semester hour of credit to- 
ward graduation, which was in 
substance giving the individual 
'the equivalent of sixteen class 
'absences for the semester fol- 
lowing that in which the index 
was achieved. Few students 
i felt that the semester hour of 
i credit was any great distinction 
or that the additional semester 
hour of credit would take care 
of absences if the student felt 
, minded tn make use of the priv- 
ilege. The Scholarship Honor 
Society petitioned the faculty 
for the Dean's list and for un- 
limited absences but the facul- 
ty did not feel that the plan 
would fit into the absence sys- 
tem in force up to this time. 

Under the new plan Washington 
College will take its place with other 
colleges which provide for the Dean's 
list. Those of junior and senior 
class standing who achieve a semes- 
ter index of 2.25 will be announced 
at the end of each semester. In ad- 
dition to the distinction of being on 
tho Dean's list the individuals on this 
list will have the privilege of unlim- 
ited absences as long as tlrey main- 
tain a satisfactory standing in the 
several classes. 

This plan will go into operation 
during the present college year with 
the first Dean's list being announced 
at the close of the first semester. 



News In Brief 

I _ 

Coleman Closes 
Reserve Shelves 

' Mr. Henry E. Coleman, Jr.. new 
i librarian, announced this week hut 
i one change in the library set-up for 
| the coming year. That change will 
be the closing of the Reserve Book 
Shelves to the students. 

This change was brought about Lo 
remedy a situation which was much 
discussed last year, that being the In- 
ability of students to obtain reserved 
books. It is thought that this change 
will enable all students to have an 
equal chance to get books by prevent- 
ing a few people from monopolizing 
them. 

Mr. Coleman remarked that the 
Bunting Library was the first one he 
had seen where Reserved Books were 
placed on open shelves. "I have 
heard," he said, "that open Reserve 
shelves have been tried in a few lib- 
raries, both large and small, but it 
has never been satisfactory." 



No Hangout Here 

The assembly hall will be open only 
for the regular assemblies and for 
regularly scheduled rehearsals of 
recognized campus organizations. 
Provisions has been made for a smok- 
ing room and coat room for the men 
students in the north basement room 
in William Smith Hall, while women 
students will use the women's coat 
room on the second floor and sororic- 
ty members will have the sororiety 
rooms available for gathering be- 
tween classes. 

Tliis plan is aimed at discouraging 
the use of the assembly hall as a 
coat room and gathering place for 
students between classes. 



Mobs Pack Halls 
As 303 Students 
Register Today 

By 2 o'clock this afternoon, 
303 students had fought their 
way through the uproar and 
confusion of registration, ac- 
cording to figures released by 
Dr. Howell. Of these, 110 
members of the Class of 1945 
have been subjected to the us- 
ual battery of aptitude tests. 
183 of last year's student body 
have returned and it is estimat- 
ed by Dr. Howell that 21 others 
will have enrolled by Monday. 
A total of 324 students are ex- 
pected for the opening of col- 
lege. 

Despite many predictions that col- 
lege enrollments would be greatly de- 
creased by the draft and defense em- 
ployment there is already an indica- 
tion of an increase over last year's 
total enrollment of 328 students and 
more are expected to register by the 
end of this week. 

Many Unprepared For Registration 

Upper classmen, in spite of then- 
experience with registration came un- 
prepared for the procedure. Many 
came with neither pen, pencil, or pap- 
er. The offices of Dr. Livingood, 
Dr. Howell, and Miss Mattie were ov- 
erflowing with students with difficul- 
ties in schedules and other small mat- 
ters. However, Miss Mattie reported 
this afternoon that she thought the 
entire procedure of registration and 
enrollment would be completed in 
record time this vear. 



Town Of Pretty Girls 



t»i 



Martin Ten Hoor, Dean of tha 

Pollege of Arts and Sciences, of Tu- 

■ '" University, has been elected 

l 'o-Prrsidcnt of the American Phil- 

mhical Association for the west- 

" division. Dr. Ten Hoor taught 

philosophy and Education al Wash 

College during the vears, 

fOU-'19. 



Alpha Chis Aid 
British Bundles 

The members of Alpha Chi Omega 
Sorority, in cooperation with Bundles 
for Britain, have placed red, white, 
and blue boxes in Hodson Hall, Wil- 
liam Smith Hall, and Reid Hall for 
the purpose of collecting as much tin- 
foil as possible. With the coopera- 
tion of the student body, much tin- 
foil can be collected from the empty 
cigarette package-, chewing gum 
wrappers, and candy wrappers which 
they will deposit in these boxes; 

The Alpha Chis will see that the 
boxes are collected and that the tin- 
toil is properly cared for. It will 
be immediately turned over to the 
nearest Bundles For Britain Unit. 



Miss Marie Whitney, '40, is a mem 
ber of the teaching staff of the Che- 
tertown High School. During the 
past year she pursued graduate work 
at the University of Pennsylvania. 




by Yardley 

.J com pptrTy 

^TrHMK TLL 

ASK eOiToO-^H^ 



oMfea 



Special To The ELM 



A popular cartoonist, who is known to thousands by only one name, 
Yardley, has very willingly contributed the above cartoon with his best 
wishes for success to the students and faculty of Washington College. His 
lirtle fat boy, who is a caricature of himself, and his cat, which is a replica 
of his cat, have become as well-known in this section of the state as Dick 
Tracy and Popeye. 

In true life, Yardley is not at all like the fat boy. He is tall and his 
friends say he looks like a half-back. His cat is large and white and has a 
great habit of running awav at the worst possible times. 
J 

The editor wishes to thank Yardley, whose cartoons appear daily in the 
Baltimore MORNING SUN, for his fine cartoon and his best wishes. 



Dr. Corrington's 
Latest Book 
On Presses 

Dr. Julian D. Corrington, head of 
the Department of Biology, complet- 
ed "Working With the Microscope" 
this summer which will be published 
by Whittlesey House of the McGraw- 
Hill Book Co., Inc., New York. The 
book will be available on and after 
October 15. 

Dr. Corrington, who was appointed 
by Governor O'Conor of Maryland, 
as the microscopic specialist of a new 
five-man Commission of Research an I 
Education, is also the author of "Ad- 
ventures with the Microscope." He 
is editor of the microscope depart- 
ment of "Nature Magazine" and the 
permanent secretary of the American 
Soeiety of Amateur Microscopists. 

"Working With The Microscope" is 
designed as a complete guide and re- 
ference work for those who wish to 
learn microscopy and microtechnique. 
Its "how to do it" instructions start 
with the simplest experiments and 
proeeed in graduated steps to highly 
technical slide preparations. 

According to Dr. Corringt. n 
"Most books written for the purpose 
of providing instructions in micro- 
technique fall into one of two class- 
es. Either they are rankly juvenile 
and unscientific, involking the sensa- 
tional in an attempt to manufacture 
an interest in the subject, or they 
are highly professional and technical, 
designed for the upper collegiate lev- 
el, and presupposing some classroom 
supervision. There seems to a ser- 
(Continued on Page 2) 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



Ts" Organize 
Branch Of War 
Relief Society 

The "Young America Wants To 
Help" society, which lias spread ::o 
rapidly through northern colleges 
and universities, is to have a branch 
at Washington College this year. This 
society is a division of the British 
' War Relief Society in charge of 
schools, colleges and other young 
croups. It was started in Oetob^! 
1940, and more than 220,000 young 
people throughout the country haVe 
responded with enthusiasm to help 
war-torn Europe survive. Washing- 
ton College is now joining this group 
to do its part. 

The Washington College branch ,if 
"Young America Wants To Help" is 
to be organized by members of the 
Y. W. C. A, and the Y. M. C. A. This 
organization has two objectives — 
(1) to collect money quickly for 
things desperately needed for civilian 
relief in Great Britain, and (2) to 
make concrete and constructive the 
ever-increasing sympathy of Ameri- 
can youth. Its organization is to 
follow the general pla.n of procedure 
— operating with three committees — 
(1) a student Executive Committee 
composed of a chairman and four to 
six members; (2) a Faculty Advisory 
Committee composed of a chairman 
and two to four faculty members and 
(3) a General Student Committee 
composed of members representing 
all phases of college activities, 

"Young America Wants To Help" 
will have fund raising projects which 
are to be decided upon by the Student 
Executive Committee. All Wash- 
ington College students and organiza- 
tions are asked to cooperate. Shall 
we do our part to further this worthy 
organization? 



Freshman Week , 



Cat System 



(Continued from Page 1) 
fi. Absences shall be counted 
from the first meeting of the class. 

7. Students who by the end of 
the first semester of their Junior year 
shall have attained a cumulative in- 
dex of 2.25 shall be placed on tlie 
Dean's list. Such students shall b'.' 
free from the usual absence regula- 
tions as long as satisfactory standing 
is maintained. 

8. Every absence incurred by a 
student who extends a holiday or va- 
cation by leaving before or returni-ig 
after the appointed time must be 
made up by an examination within 
two weeks after the return of the ab- 
sentee. f - A fee of $2.00, to be paid 
in advance to the Dean, will be 
charged. In case a student fails to 
comply with this regulation he will oe 
dropped from the class in which the 
absence occurs until the examination 
has been taken. Absences up to t 
time of reinstatement will count in 
the usual manner. 

9. A student who absents himself 
from a test previously announced or 
from a regular examination will not 
be permitted to take a special test or 
examination except on the payment 
of a fee of $2.00, which must be paid 
at the time he secures a permit for 
the same at the Dean's office. 

10. A Faculty Committee on Ab- 
sences will investigate and decide on 
exceptional cases of absence. A stu- 
dent may petition the Faculty Com- 
mittee on Absences to waive the pen- 
alty in exceptional cases. 

11. Each student will be expectei 
to keep his own record of absences 
No information concerning absence.- 
will be given by the Dean's office ex- 
cept the usual notice when the stu- 
dent has exhausted the number of al 
lowed absences for any course for the 
semester. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Program for Saturday and Sunday 
as follows: 

Saturday, September 20th 

0:00 — Freshmas Assembly, William 
Smith Hall. "Your Future at Wash- 
ington College". Dr. Gilbert W. 
Mead, President; Introduction of Pas- 
tors of Chestertown Churches: Dr. 
Charles L. Atwater. Emmanuel Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church; Reverend 
Paul E. Reynolds, First Methodist 
Church; Dr. Winfred P. Roberts, 
Christ Methodist Church; Father 
Charles J. Conway, Sacred Heart 
Catholic Church; Reverend Theodore 
H. Ernst, Trinity Evangelical Luther- 
an Church. 

8:00 — Reception and Dance, Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa Society, Harry El- 
mer Lore, Jr., President. 

Sunday, September 21st 

8:30 — Mass, Sacred Heart Catholic 
Church. 

9:45 — Church School, Protestant 
Churches. 

11:00 — Church Services, Protes- 
tant Churches. Committees from the 
several churches will meet students 
and conduct them to the several 
churches. 

3:00-5:00 — Tea for faculty and 
tudents, Reid Hall; Women's Student 
Council, Margaret Ayavs Pitt, Pres- 
ident. 

6:30 — College Vespers, Christian 
Association, Reid Hall. William M. 
Nagler, President of Y. M. C. A.; 
Phyllis J. Peters, President of Y. W. 
C. A. 



Dr. Corrington . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 

ious need for a manual aimed at that 
large body of serious workers who 
fall in between these two extremes. 

"Our aim in the present case has 
been to write a graded series of ex- 
ercises in the mounting of materials 
for observation under the micro- 
scope. Beginning with the simplest! 
and proceeding by easy stages to ad-j 
vanced operations, the explanations! 
have been made as detailed and non-j 
technical as possible. The plan is f o ; 
learn as you do, with the intent "f 
training the reader from scratch or 
from any point he may previously j 
have reached." 

The book is fully illustrated. Lead-! 
ing optical companies furnished il-] 
lustrations of instruments, althouet, 
owing to conditions in Europe, this] 
representation was unable to be ex-| 
tended. Pen drawings in the bookj 
were executed by Mrs. Corrington. ! 

Dr. Corrington received his A. B. | 
and Ph. D. at Cornell University. He 
is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and 
Sigma Xi. 



The Tenth Anniversary Reunkn 
gift .-f the Class of 1931, presented 
at Commencement time, will be used 
for the construction of a trophy ca^e 
ini the College's athletic trophies. It 
will he located in the lounge of Hoii- 
son Hall. 




WHERE TO GO FOR ENTERTAINMENT 

"THE HOUSE OF HITS" 

CHURCHILL 

TWO SHOWS EVERT NIGHT 7 & 9 P. M. MAT. EVERT SAT. 
ALWAYS COMFORTABLE AT THE HOUSE OF HITS 



- ENTIRE WEEK - 

BEGINNING SATURDAY, SEPT. 20TH 
Special Matinee, Saturday & Tuesday, 2 P. M. 

Put Off Everything ! 
Cancel All Appointments ! 

Hold Everything! 

FOR 

Here Is • • • Something Mew 
Here Is . • • Something Different 




starring 

ROBERT 







RITA JOHNSON 
as JULIA... who 
t believe what she i«e*I 



Dr. Gilbert Wilcox Mead will offi- 
cially open the ICOth year of Wash- 
ington College at the formal convoca- 
tion next Thursday. 



FEATURE Begins — 7:30 and 9:30 P. M. 
DUE — To the daring and unusual treatment given this 
story we urge you to come at the beginning of 
the picture. 




EDW. EVERETT HORTON 
as MESSENGER 7013, 
la * panic to panic you I 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



TIMELY 
TOPICS 



PAGE THREE 



After several days of rolickinc fun 
and the relating: of vacation tale: 
most of the students should be ready 
to settle down to some serious work. 
Of course, the end for the Freshmen 
boys will come Sunday night about 
12:30 . . . One of the first things we 
noticed when we got back in town was 
the prolongation of the sidewalk 
down by Bordk-y's corner. Bill John- 
son, when he was president of the 
Student Council several years ago be- 
gan the agitation for this improve- 
ment . . . We were very much startled 
in the middle of the Summer to hear 
that East Hall was going to be made 
over into a woman's dorm to accom- 
modate the over-run of girls. Of 
course, it was just an idle rumor like 
.ill others. As a matter of fact, as 
far as can be ascertained, the draft 
has not affected the enrollment of 
Washington College. Associated 
Collegiate Press reports that niosi 
colleges anticipated a twenty-five per 
cent decrease in enrollments. 

Due to negligence or indifference 
on the part of certain of the Y. M, C. 
A, officers, the Handbook was put off 
until about ten days before the be- 
ginning of school. This naturally re- 
sulted in a payment of overtime to 
the printing company in order to meet 
the deadline. We haven't heard any 
excuses yet and we aren't exactly in- 
terested. We are interested, though, 
in knowing if they will assume the 
added expense. Not as an apology, 
but as a matter of explanation, any 
errors in the Handbook, typographi- 
cal or otherwise, may be blamed on 
this lack of time. 

Last year, there were several re- 
marks about the lack of student lead- 
ers in school or the serious lack of 
initiative, whichever the case may be. 
We wonder what the Class of '45 w-ll 
have to offer . . . Summer as well as 
in winter, school goes on. We re- 
turned about a week early only to 
find all the Administrative officers 
bard at it. Many of them have had 
only a week's vacation ... A new 
rule has been passed that each stu- 
dent must keep his own record of 
lilts. Miss Mattie will not be allow- 
ed to furnish this information. Thank 
God one little job can be taken from 
her shoulders. 

A very special welcome is to be ex- 
tended to the two new members of 
our faculty. Dr. Coleman and Dr. 
Kline. May they learn to love Wash- 
ington College as we have . . . Dr. 
Snyder is to be congratulated on the 
addition to his family . . . Even small 
organizations like the Washington 
ELM are feeling the war. We were 
np lp up from printing several days be- 
cause of the paper shortage . . . Var- 
ious changes have been made in the 
!.vstem of absenses and excuses. We 
haven't mastered the new system yet 
hut a complete explanation can De 
found otherwheres in this edition . . . 
We want to say "thank you" to the 
virions members of the Administra- 
tion and Faculty who have cooperated 
ith us so readily in this first issue. 
"I«y this cooperation between the; 
ELM and the faculty continue. 

Football is once more on the tip of 
everyone's tongue. There is some-l 
'hing about football that reminds us 
i Christmas. It just gets in your 
oones. Many of the teams see their i 
prat action tomorrow afternoon, the 
closest to us, probably, being Navv. 
No doubt many of the students will 
Bo over to Crabtown tomorrow after- 
oon to see the Sailors take over Wil- 
a, a and Mary. And our own Sho'- 
n,t, i should have a good season thi^ 
with about twenty veterans re- 
turning to the field. They include 
AU-Maryland Ray Kirby and All- 
Maiyland-to-be A] Dudderar. 

The sorority girls are not to be out- 
Pone by any means. Many of them 



from each organization were back 
school a week early cleaning their 
new club rooms for the unsuspectin; 
mice to gawk at. Many of them hav 
a whole summer's growth on thei 
finger nails and their hair-pulling is 
at its best form . . . President Ray 
Kirby of the Student Council has 
shown the Freshmen from the begin- 
ning the power and importance of 
Student Government. No one would 
expect an All-Maryland football play- 
er of being such an orator . . . We're 
expecting big things from the Science 
Society this year with such a consci- 
entious and hard-working president 
as Jim Diaeumakus. It is one of the 
most important organizations on the 
Hill, being the only one for science 
students ... We wonder how the Col- 
lege Mother, Mrs. Lawrence is going 
to continue to give us those good 
meals with the rise in food prices. It's 
going to be a problem. 



Chestertown firemen have been 
; having practice blackouts throughout 
i the summer. We learned through 
Secret channels that Washington Col- 
lege and Gill Brothers are considered 
an objective of war. 
So long and thirty. 



—oo- 



George Bacon Raison, Jr., '37, Mar- 
vin H. Smith, Baltimore, '37, and Ed- 
ward Turner, ex-'38, all passed the 
Maryland State Bar this summer. Mr. 
Raisin has established offices at Ches- 
tertown. 



£ Wei 



To C he* tor low n 
From The 

"RENDEZVOUS BEAUTY 
SALON" 



Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 

Chestertown, Maryland 
Phone 132W 



SALUN" f 

t 209 Hi B h St. Phone 334 £ 



Welcome Students To 
Washington College 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 

Radio Headquarters 



DO YOU HAVE A TUX?.... 

Rent One 
For The Dance 

—AT— 

ALBERT L. WHEAT 
Men's Shop 

High Street Phone 251J 

— Also — 

Men's Clothing 

and 

Accessories 




<£ > *** J>J * fJ ><***r*Xr*r>yX*>^^ 



*-M-M-«-M-S-^»««<Mm^-»««<^^« 



A Familiar Word 
Around the College . . 

BENNETT'S 



Only A Few Steps Up From 
The College 




A Word of Welcome . . . 

After a hot summer waiting on a lot of folks we didn't know ... it is 
swell to have you all back with us again for another year at good old 
Washington College. To you who are attending your freshman year 
we heartily extend a welcome hand and bid you every success. 
Follow the crowd up to Bennett's . . . and get the true story of why so 
many students make this their headquarters. 



BENNETT'S 

Everything That Is Good 
To Eat And Drink 




<-0~«hX«XK«><-$h*«>^^«><-$m><mXh^^ 




PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



Education First — 
Duty Next 

"The destiny of mankind is not 
decided by material computation 
when forces today are on the move 
in the world stirring men's souls, 
drawing them from their firesides, 
casting aside comfort, amusement, 
wealth and the pursuit of happiness 
in responses to impulses at once all- 
striking and irresistible. Then it is 
we learn we are spirits — not ani- 
mals — and that something is going 
on beyond space and time which, 
whether we like it or not, spells 
duty. 

"A wonderful story is unfolding 
before our eyes. How it will end 
we are not allowed to know. But 
on both sides of the Atlantic we all 
feel — I repeat all — that we are a 
part of it, that our future and that 
of many generations is at stake. We 
are sure that the character of hu- 
man society will be shaped by the 
resolves we take and the deeds we 
do." 

Thus spoke Mr. Winston Chur- 
chill early last June. "... some- 
thing that is going on beyond space 
and time which, whether we like it 
or not, spells duty." That duty for 
us as college students, according fo 
the President of the United States, 
lies not in our participation in the 
armed forces, but, in the further- 
ment of our education. "We must 
think sanely and rule our emotions 
by our intellects, allowing neither 
cynicism nor wishful thinking to 
shadow the clarity of our ideals," 
wrote President Mead in a message 
to the ELM last May concerning the 
foreign situation. Education is 
necessary for unbiased and unpre- 
judiced thinking. 

And so, all the indications for us 
point to the completion of our col- 
lege courses to supplement our later 
military training. These messages 
apply to men and women alike. Ed- 
ucation first, military training after- 
wards. 

And so it is, we extend the heart- 
iest of welcomes to the Freshmen. 
Today, more than ever before, your 
decision to come to college is im- 
portant. It is important not only 
to yourself but to your country. You 
are doing your duty. Military train- 



ing will undoubtedly enter your 
lives later, but then, you will be 
equipped already with the most im- 
portant and most essential tool of 
all — education. 

Again — welcome Freshmen. Dur- 
ing your four years here, apply 
yourselves so that you can make 
that "V" become a reality. J. C. J. 



They Support Us; 
You Support Them 



President Kirby 
Welcomes You 

The Student Government Associ- 
ation cordially welcomes you back 
for another year of scholastic work. 
This year, as always, the Council 
will strive to stimulate the desire 
for better relationship between the 
students and faculty, a definite 
sense of responsibility, and above 
all to foster a zealous regard for in- 
dividual honor. 

, To those of you who are becom- 
ing acclimated to college life — re- 
member that Washington College is 
small, numerically only. It is a 
school in which the scholastic and 
fraternity life and the full program 
of extra curricular activities devel- 
op in each student qualities of coop- 
eration, leadership, initiative and 
those personal attributes that are so 
essential in the world today. 

In' order to maintain the high 
standards and rich traditions that 
we so dearly hold, it is necessary to 
have complete cooperation from the 
entire student body — do not forget 
that you are an important part of 
the Student Government Associa- 
tion of Washington College and that 
your actions reflect the spirit of the 
Institution. Become familiar with 
the rules and regulations of the Col- 
lege — obey them with a smile and 
ward off the antagonistic trend 
which sometimes unconsciously de- 
velops. 

This Institution is for the welfare 
of its students and its success is gov- 
erned primarily by your conduct. 
Let us "hop on the bandwagon" and 
make this another banner year, 
scholastically, athletically, and tra- 
ditionally. Begin immediately to 
do your part and let's see Washing- 
ton College grow even greater. 
Rayfield Kirby, 

Pres. S. G. A. 



When you saw your paper a few 
minutes ago, there were two things 
about it that stood out above all 
else. One was the increased num- 
ber of pages and the other was the 
increased number of advertise- 
ments 'and their attractiveness. It 
is these advertisements about which 
we would like to talk. 

This morning, our presses ran off 
1,000 papers just like this one 
you're reading. We paid our prin- 
ter approximately ?150 for this one 
issue. About $25 more were add- 
ed to this bill for mi.^dlaneous ex- 
penses involved in p; '..ting out a 
paper of this kind. This gives us a 
bill of about §175 for one edition of 
the ELM. However, we have 29 
more editions of the ELM to come 
out this year, each of which will 
cost us from ?50 to $150. Our 
subscription rate of $1.50 pel' year 
makes this ELM cost you 5c and 
gives us a total revenue of $50 from 
this issue which is only 2-7 of our 
expenses. To meet the rest of our 
expenses, we must sell advertise- 
ments. This means that the mer- 
chants whose advertisements you 
see in this paper are bearing about 
5-7 of the expense of your paper. 
That is why it is important to us and 
to you that you patronize these ad- 
vertisers. 

When we approach a merchant 
with our advertisement contracts, 
we take his money with the idea 
that he is getting full value from it.' 
In other words, we sell him the idea 
that when our readers see his ad in 
our paper, they will spend their 
money with him so that he will re- 
alize a value from that ad. 

Therefore, as college students, in 
oider that we may keep our paper, 
and also that we can do justice to 
our merchants, we should assume 
the responsibility of patronizing our 
advertisers. 



You Give It 
To Yourself 

Cooperation between students 
and instructors is an essential part 



of the program of Washington Col- 
lege. Instructors are in their class- 
rooms and laboratories at appoint- 
ed hours and it is expected that the 
students will be there likewise. The 
student should clearly understand 
that every absence from class is a 
loss. The responsibility for any 
work missed because of absence 
rests entirely upon the student. 
There is no such thing as securing 
an "excuse" which will relieve the 
student of this responsibility. 

Regular and prompt class attend- 
ance is an essential part of college 
work. A student whose class at- 
tendance has been unsatisfactory 
will be dropped from the class roll. 
When a student has been dropped 
fro mtwo courses he may be requir- 
ed to leave college. A student may 
voluntarily change or drop a course 
only with the consent of the Dean 
an dthe Advisor by whom the course 
has been approved. 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF _,_ J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 
BUSINESS MANAGER- Rufus C. Johnson 

Enterprise Print Shop — Telephone 19 

Published weekly, from September 19 to 
May 29, except holidays, by and for the in- 
terests of the student body, faculty and 
alumni of Washington College, the tenth 
oldest institution of higher learning in the 
United States. Founded at Chesteitown, 
Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be 
published. Names will not be published 
if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in 
length- 
Annual subscription, $1.50, payable in 
advance. Entered as second class matter 
at the Chesteitown postoffice. 

Dr. H. O. Werner, faculty advisor. 

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 19, 1941 



College Students And Elm Are 
Congratulated By Md. Governor 

In these days of rapid changes in every phase of our 
existence, it is a pleasure indeed, to be able to felicitate the 
Professors and Students of Washington College on the be- 
ginning of the 160th year of the College, as well as of the 
60th year of your college paper. 

With instability of government the predominent char- 
acteristic of life today, the span of years covered by the his- 
tory of Washington College has witnessed complete govern- 
mental upheavels in practically every country in the world 
with the exception of the United States. 

While all the then Old World cast dubious eyes upon 
the new republic when it was founded in this Western 
Hemisphere, and confidently looked for its early dissolu- 
tion, the inherent virility of democracy is apparent in the 
fact that this nation of ours has survived while all other 
forms of government in the world nave undergone great 
change. 

The college youths of today face a grave problem in 
that they must safeguard our free democratic institutions 
against the onslaughts that threaten on all sides. It is a 
responsibility that no loyal American boy can evade. 
Every future citizen of our country must be ready to de- 
vote his best efforts and talents to the defense of our 
ideologies and our shores, if they are attacked. 

In the modern warfare of today, too, skill is vastly 
more important than manpower, and it is to the college- 
trained man of the country particularly that we must look 
for the specialized skills so necessary for development of 
defense materials. The college student today, therefore, 
should face his years in the classroom with a double pur- 
pose in mind. He must be preparing himself not only for 
future personal advancement, but also for the possible 
utilization of his abilities and services for the good of his 
country. 

Herbert R. O'Conor 



Ted Husing Is 
Nation's No. 1 
Grid Announcer 

By kickoff time each Saturday, 
Ted Husing, CBS football announcer, 
hows that Tom Jones, left half, rubs 
his hands before getting his pass 
frorii center. That enables Ted and 
his assistant, Jimmy Dolan, to spot 
complicated spinners and sneak plays. 
He also watches John Smith, the right 
ehd. John always glances nervously 
at the stands when his number is call- 
ed to receive a long forward pass. 

Ted's method is simple. First, he 
selects the most promising football 
game of the coming Saturday. Sev- 
eral days before the game, he travels 
to the home town. He haunts the 
practice fields, carefully watching 
coaches and players on each team. He 
visits fraternity houses and college 
hangouts. Ted even interviews the 
star halfbacks, the Waterboys, and the 
head coaches. The night before the 
game, he assembles all of the data on 
index cards like a college man pre- 
paring a term paper. Then he's 
ready. 

Many of Husing's radio followers 
pick their announcer instead of their 
g;;me. Ted's staccado voice, his de- 
tailed accounts of the private lives 
of the members of the first teams, his 
accurate presentation of the game, all 
attract thousands of listeners. 

Has Streamlined Broadcasting 
He has literally streamlined foot- 
ball broadcasting. To combine ac- 
curacy and speed in his reporting, lie 
(Continued on Page 9) 



Students And Faculty Petition 
For Five-Day Scholastic Week 



(Reprinted from "Tho Cavalier) 

"Students in some college and uni- 
versities of America have long advo- 
cated the "five day week" — through 
abolition of Saturday classes. 

At the University of Georgia, it 
seems to be quite possible that the 
plan will be adopted in the "Athens 
of the South." 

Campus opinion is said to be prac- 
tically unanimous behind the faculty- 
student drive for the five-day week. 

Professors and students state that 
the end of Saturday classes will aid 
scholastic standards. 

They say, also, that it will give stu- 
dents who live far from Athens a 
chance to go home occasionally with- 
out "cutting out." 

The boon to scholastic standards is 
expected to come in this manner: 

The present system by which ef- 
fective instruction is given only four 
days a week will be superseded by a 
five day instruction week without the 
class "off-days." 

As the situation now stands, pro- 
fessors only face open classrooms on 
Saturdays and the students thus lose 
one day of instruction when Satur- 
day's lesson has to be repeated 'in 
Monday. 

In addition, by abolishing Saturday 
classes, professors will be given more 
time for research. 

It sounds to many people like a 
good idea. What do you think about 
it?" 

Ed. Note: This article was reprint- 



ed merely for its interest. It does 
not rellect the opinion of the ELM. 
However, the ELM would be inten 

ed in publishing letters from its read- 
ers discussing the pros and eons of a 
"five-day week." 



Friendship Is 
Only A Dime 

Do you sit home evenings? Have 
people been avoiding you? Do your 
best friends turn away from you? In 
other words, are you a cigarette bum- 
mer? 

There is a definite technique 
both bumming cigarettes and keeping 
friends. Why not combine the two 
and become socially accepted? 

1. You can steal it (I refer to the 
science department). 

2. If it's a girl, just talk about 
her beautiful eyes and reach for her 
cigarettes. 

:j. You can always refer to the 
mythical cigarette you gave them 
once, 

4. Say that you have stopped 
smoking and just need one so you 
can go on stopping. 

5. Of course, you can always use 
blackmail (the most successful). 

The writer has tried all methods 
and guarantees none, which proves 
that the only thing to do is to buy 
your own 10c brand. It's such 8 
small price to pay for friendship. 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



Registrar Releases List Of New 
Students Accepted By College 



Freshmen — Ellen Boiko, Anne C.l 
Boiling, Ruth J. Broadwater, Joan, 
Marie Connors, Mary Marjraret Cook-, 
s ey, Amandii Vii-Einia Crew, Florence. 
Hurtt Deringcr, Marian V. Dinger, J 
Elizabeth Dor.scy, Ellen S. Edwards, 
Maiiannn Everngam, Fiances H. 
Oiirdncr, Peggy E. Gilland, Frances I 
M- Goodwin, Jean A. Grabcr, Eleanrrf 
I„ Harnischfeger, Charlotte R. Hig-i 
nutt, Jean E. Home. 

Frances P. Johnson, Ruth F. John-i 
■snn, Shirley M. Leaverton, Anna Ruth j 
hogan, Isahel C. Lowery, Mary Lu[ 
Lumpkin, Ellenor M. Merriken, Mavy] 
Elizabeth Nash, Grace P. Neighbour 
Eleanor M. Newton, Miriam H. O'ck 
er, Harriet B. Olsen, Marian E. Potts 
Dorothy Marie Prigel, Dorothy \ 
Rcindollar, Grace M. Stouffer, Alice 
L. Sutherland, Marie Louise Thorn, 
ton, Ida Louise Ward, Joan Johnston 

Upperelassmen — Louise L. Ham- 
mond, Hilda L. Hotchkiss, Lois Mar- 
garet Stevens. 

Men to be admitted are: 

Freshmen — Joseph R. Arnold, 
Wayne G. Barker, John E. Barnes, 
Jr., Clifford A. Brockson, William F. 
Carver, Leonard A. Cohen, Thomas J. 
Copcland, III, John A. Deringer, 
Warren S. Elliott, Harold M. Eng- 
lish, J. Russell English, William C. 
Ershlcr, Walter J. Falardeau, Jr., 
Randolph T. Faulkner, Hendrick A. 
Forss, Charles Fuller, James L. Gar- 
ner, Millard S. Gentry, John Lee Gill, 
Charles A. Goberman, Robert G. 
Grove, Daniel A. Hall, James P. Har- 
ry, Turner B. Hastings, Theodore J. 
Hazlett, Fern R. Hitehcock, Jr., John 
A. Hitchcock, Donald O. Hornung. 
■ Robert Horsfield, Robert S. Horo- 



witz, Richard F. Jablin, Morton C. 
Katzenberg, William S. Kirby, Taylor 
Ellsworth Lambdin, Valentine . W. 
Lentz, Jr., Guy E. Levner, G. Wil- 
liam Loll, Alexander J. Maekrell, Ed- 
ward W. Mullinix, Alexander Ockry- 
inick, Allan Bernard Peckman, Paul 
S. Parris, Jr., Wilford H. Payne, Jr., 
Robert W. Pierce, William C. Pretty- 
man, Vernon D. Reed, David Sey- 
mour, Milton R. Sheppard, Frederick 
W. Shillinger, Francis A. Shinnamon, 
Joseph A. Sutton, James F. Svee, 
Norman Tarr, Ford G. Thomas, Fran- 
cis W. Twupack, George G. Voith, 
Henry B. Warfield, Kenneth L. Wil- 
kinson, Charles F. Wilson, Walter E. 
Woodford, Jr. 

Upperelassmen — George E. Kees- 
ter, Jay H. Maltz, William R. Slem- 
mer, Jr., David H. Hess. 

Harry D. Berry, Jr., Roger S. Ber- 
ry, Archy PL Horner, Lyle T. John- 
ston, Jr., Samuel Klein, Albert W. 
Nowak, Samuel A. Saltsman, Jr., John 
G. Walters. 



College To Get 
Trophy Case 

A trophy case for the college's ath- 
letic trophies will be built and placed 
in the lounge of Hodson Hall. The 
case is being built from a reunion 
gift to the President's Office from the 
Class of 1931 in recognition of the 
tenth anniversary of their graduation. 
This will be the first time that all the 
athletic awards of the college have 
been gathered under one case. 



-oo— 



are a ready 
t bother to 



write let- 



Student*, if y, 
correspondent, 6 
read this. 

If you don't like t 
ters, we will send one home for 
you every week. So that your 
parents can be completely in- 
formed of Washington College 
activities with the least effort 

ELM home every week. It will 
be a welcomed gift and it will 
cost you but $1.00. 

Special to Freshmen boys. 
Next week's ELM will have pic- 
tures of the Rat Party that 
would be very interesting to 
the home folks. 



SHOES LOOK NEW! 




Our expert service puts 
worn shoes into A-l con- 
dition for back-to-school 
wear. 

PAUL'S 

SHOEMAKER 

CHESTERTOWN 




Make the Most of Yourself 

Attention is focused on a lovely 
head of hair just as much as on the 
latest Fall gown. Discover the 
most flattering way to wear your 
hair, try out the nail polish that 
goes with the new Fall colors. Beau- 
ty is your heritage . . . guard it every 
day and polish it up for the season. 



Permanent s 



$5.00 up 



Hair Styling A Speciality 

La RAINE 
BEAUTY SHOP 

Chestertown Phone 434 




Ijiljlj IjJiUi3« • • 

The Favorite Meeting Place 
Of All College Students 
elcomes You! 



GET ACQUAINTED OFFER 



You'll no sooner set your feet on the campus . . . and you'll hear a cou- 
ple of juniors yelling to each other "Meet You At Gills." That saying 
by the way has been the by-word of the campus ever since Gill Bros, 
opened their doors. 

But — this ad is being inserted to welcome every student, young and old, 
and of course our many friends on the faculty . . . It's doggone good to 
have you all back with us. 

Accept our good wishes for a successful year. 

GILL BROS. 

ICE CREAM SODAS "A" MILK 



JUMBO 

Ice Cream 

SODA 

Any Flavor 

10c 




PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



Many '40 Lettermen Answer Initial Call To Grid Practice Wednesday 



All-Maryland Kiihy, Lou Yerkes, 
And Al Dudderar Among Men 



Coach George Ekaitis, popular 
football mentor, who for many years 
has had the worries of a tremendous 
lack of seasoned material, this year 
finds that his worries along that line 
are just about over. Just as other 
schools begin to feel the effects of 
the draft, about twenty seasoned vet- 
erans return to Ekaitis. Among 
them will be Ray Kirhy, guard, who 
won All-Maryland laurels last year 
and Al Dudderar who is almost sure- 
fire All-Maryland at center this year. 
In the backfield, Ekaitis has Yerkc- , 
Maciclng, Jackson 



Grads Star In 
Class B Ball 



ban returning. Big Charlie Fetter 
was lost at graduation while Stoney 
McLaughlan was unable to return be- 
cause of the draft. Yerkes should 
bear the brunt of the passing and 
running attack this year after a full 
season of college experience last 
year. Macielag, Sophomore, who is 
a returning letterman will be called 
upon to do most of the kicking. Jack- 
son and Hoban, although light, have 
proven themselves dependable as re- 
serve men. Ekaitis is contemplating 
moving Kirby from the guard posi- 
tion to the backfield to add weight to 
the offensive part of the team. 

Returning for the end positions arc- 
only Bill Benjamin and Steele. Ben- 
jamin, a letterman from last year, 
has added weight over the summer 
and should show great improvement. 
Walt Brandt, who starred against 
Western Maryland last year will be 
out due to injuries. Steele, a big 
boy, though inexperienced, should 
shape up good in the four weeks 
practice before the opening contest. 

At tackle are Ray Sinclair and Bill 
Benjamin, both big boys, who should 
be able to hold the line very efficient- 
ly after last year's experience. Coach 
Ekaitis will have to depend upon 
Freshmen for reserves at this p> 
tion. Not to be forgotten at 
guard position is Abner Reidy, a 
rawboned athlete who can hold a line 
with the best of 'em. Frank Gilo 
and Jimmy Dougherty as well as All- 
Maryland Ray Kirby will also be a- 
vailablc for the guard position. 

At center, although experienced 
reserve men are available in Doc 
Slade and Jerry Sohl, Al Dudderar 
will continue to be the big show. His 
defensive ability will have much to 
do with u winning Ekaitis te'am this 
year. 

With any material at all from the 
Freshman class and the four weens 
practice that will come before the 
opening game with Johns Hopkin.;, 
Coach George Ekaitis should put an 
eleven on the field that Washington 
students will be proud to acclaim. 



by Jim Spielman 

Hagerstoun, Md. — In this Western 
Maryland metropolis, swelled by de- 
fense work, local baseball fans en- 
joyed organized baseball for the first 
time since the Blue Ridge League dis- 
banded ten years ago. Hageistnwn 
acquired a franchise in the Inter- 
Morgan and Ho- 1 State League. 




Two Washington graduates furth- 
ered their baseball careers in this In- 
ter-State League (Class B) the pa.-,t 
season. Mike Kanlash, '41, played 
shortstop for the Hagcrstown Owls 
and Addis Copple, '40, pitched for 
the Lancaster Red Roses. 

For Mike, it was a great season', 
with a wife and a college degree in- 
cluded. "Little Mike", as Owl fans 
called him, ended the season with a 
.205 batting average and his fielding 
was generally regarded second only 
to Harrisburg's shortstop Bill Cox, 
who was sold to the Pittsburg Pirates 
for. ?20,000. Batting sixth in the 
lineup for the greater part of the sea- 
son, Kardash proved a dangerous hit- 
ter in the clutch and several of the 
75 victories the Owls garnered dur- 
ing the season can be directly credit- 
ed to the peppery shortstop's timely 
hitting. 

Perhaps Mike's best day was a Sun- 
day double header with the pennant 
winning Harrisburg Senators. In 
the two games, he banged out 4 dou- 
bles and a single. (There was an 
Oriole scout in the stands). 

Kardash and his wife, former Ele- 
anor Rieck, cx-'43, have moved honv; 
to Baltimore where Mike expects to 
tne | do defense work. He hopes that 
next year may find him in the Balti- 
more Oriole lineup. 

"Lefty" Copple, who was a sensa- 
tion in high school and college, took 
it on the chin quite a few times this 
summer with the last place Lancaster 
Red Roses. "Cop" was a month get- 
ting settled with a club and after 



Ray Kirby. 



Ray Kirby, All-Maryland guard, 
announced this week that he had de- 
cided to play another year of foot- 
ball for Washington College, Ho 
will begin practice on Monday. It 
had been doubtful throughout the 
summer that Kirby would 
the squad this year. 



'41 Schedule 
For Gridmen 

Washington College will open its 
1941 football schedule with Johi.s 
Hopkins in Kibler Field on October 
II, just three weeks and three days 
following the first practice. Th:s| 
will also be the opener lor the Blue] 
Jays. Present plans make Home- 
coming fall on the second game of 
the season, the following week-en 1 
with Randolph-Macon. 

The 1341 football schedule: 

Or.t. 11— Hopkins 

Oct. 18 — Randolph-Macon __ 

Oct. 25 — Juniata 

Nov. 1— P. M. C. __ 

Nov. 8 — Ursinus 

Nov. 15 — Mt. St. Mary's 

Nov. 22 — Delaware 



WONG LEE 

CHINESE 

LAUNDRY 

317 Cannon St. 
Chestertown, Md. 



Home 
Honv? 
Away 
Honv? 
Away 
Home 
Away 



A new hot house has been added tt 
the equipment of the science depart- 
ment during the summer. The addi- 
tion, which is located beside the pow- 
rn to' er P' ail t, will be used for experimen- 
tal purposes. 



Kirby, at guard, coupled with Al 
Dudderar at the center spot, were one 
of the best offensive and defensive 
combinations in Maryland football 
circles last year. Kirby was voted 
All-Maryland while Dudderar, at cen- 
ter, lost out to Smith of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 



DEPARTMEN 
STORE 

High Street 



FORD and MERCURY 
Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



minor difficulties were ironed out the 
left hander could not find that con- 
trol which he once possessed.. "Cop" 
did win some games; and good ones 
too. His losses were greater in num- 
ber, however he did not always get 
the kind of support he deserved. 

"Lefty" pitched a great game a- 
gainst Hagerstown one Sunday and 
had the Owls' wings tied until the 
late innings when the pressure be- 
came too great and the top came off. 
Several times after tough game.-, 
"Cop" was heard to say, "Why any 

(1 high school kid could do better 

than that." In the least, "Lefty" 
has the experience and memories of 
the season in the Inter-State League 
and he still looks like he has the stuff 
to keep 'em swingin'. 



BARNETTS BARBER SHOP 
Has Served 

Senator Scott Beck Bill Nicholson 

Judge Benjamin A. Johnson Fred Usilton 

Judge Stephen Collins Judge Lewin Wickes 

ALL ONCE WASHINGTON COLLEGE STUDENTS 

WON'T YOU DROP IN? 



—Opens - Week Days 10 A. M. - Sundays 2 P. M.— 



Bartolini Will 
Assist Coach 

Coach George Ekaitis announced, 
today that Dave Bartolini, who is out 
of football due to injuries suffered in 
the past two years, will aid in train-) 
ing the backfield squad. 

Bartolini, a Connecticut boy who 
made his letter during his Freshman 
and Sophomore years, was a triplvj- 
threater in th ebacktield. However, 
he suffered several injuries about the 
knees in the past two years and was 
forced to retire from the game. 

This addition to the coaching staff 
will enable Coach Ekaitis to devote 
more of his time to the linesmen and 
the finer pointe of the game. 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 

Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 

Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 




Why not take her bowling on your next date? 
It is an enjoyable and inexpensive way to 
spend an evening, and in the clean, pleasant 
surroundings of King Pin Alleys you can have 
a really fine time. Make bowling a recrea- 
tion-habit — it will pay dividends in health 
and fun! 

KING PIN BOWLING ALLEYS 

Phone 499 for Reservations 



4-><H*!-><><<-Wrt-<r><~><rt-><>i^<X^^ 



STIME'S 
ORVIS 
SHOP 

^4 Friend/y 
Store . . . 

WE DELIVER 

WELCOME To Chestertown 

Located In 
Voshell House Phone 26 




n 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE SEVEN 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A Store Run For The Convenience 
Of The Students 

FRESHMEN 

Stop In And Get 

FRIENDLY SERVICE 



Order Coal Now ! 

WHY 
WAIT? 
Phone 

149 



C. W. KIB 
AND SO 

CHESTERTOWN 

For Better 
Servic 




STUDENTS- 
When Your Parents Visit College 
Take Them To— 

The Bellhaven 

HOME OF 

GOOD FOOD 




BUY THE BEST 
Men's Clothing 

As Advertised 
In LIFE 

BOSTONIAN SHOES 
MANHATTAN SHIRTS 
INTERWOVEN SOCKS 
WEMBLEY TIES 

Bordley & Son 



How To Win 
In A Hurry By 
One Who Did 

by Dot Reidy 

At the close of every year, most 
girls who are interested in athletics 
at all, begin to wonder who is going 
to get the cup. This very attractive 
award is given to the girl in college 
who has accumulated the highest 
number of points throughout the 
year. The points can be won in 
many different ways. Just by at- 
tending gym classes you may win 
them. Another easy way to win 
these points is by going out for all 
sports offered to girls, which you 
probably know are quite a few. 

However, there are other awards 
lor those who cannot win the silver 
cup. If you have won a thousand 
points during the year, you receive a 
white sweater with a small Washing- 
ton College emblem on it. Every 
girl who has won one of these is very 
proud of it. I say that from my own 
experience. 

Now, for a few details concerning 
the thousand points. Suppose you 
went out for hoekey (I hope you do) 
and you make the class team. Well, 
you have fifty points right there. If 
you are good enough, you will make 
the varsity team which gives you one 
hundred points. Most every girl 
makes the class team, but all can't 
possibly make the varsity team, so 
you should really have something to 
work for. 

Basketball, which is the main win 
ter spovt on the campus for girls, i: 
wonderful exercise girls (and yoi 
know what I mean) and you get 
points for having perfect attendence 
in this sport, as well as others. You 
only play two nights a week. 

When spring comes along, I kn<jk 
what you're thinking, but Spring ath- 
letics are best of all. Archery, ten- 
nis, badminton and ping-pong are all 
here for you to pick from. All of 
these sports are used for tourna- 
ments. Points again pop up for en- 
trance in the tournament and if you 
are in the finals, you win a hundred 
points. 

Those girls who are fortunate 
enough, and have access to horses for 
riding, can easily pick up points the 
whole year. 

Walking is good exercise too, so 
when you have nothing fb do, take a 
walk girls and add up on that total 
score. 

I forgot to tell you, but if your 
class team wins the school champion- 
ship, which is played off in hockey 
and basketball, each member of the 
team wins one hundred points. 

Now, these thousand points aren't 
hard to win, so every girl dig in and 
get their points this year. Let's have 
a lot of runner-ups also for that lov- 
ing cup. Don't let the same girl 
keep it every year. 



GIRL 'S 
SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



Before the girls have recovered 
from the trails of Freshman Week 
and learned the significance of the 
Sacred L, Miss Doris will be groom- 
ing them as future campus athletes. 

Miss Doris is not hard for me to 
describe to you since her jaunty walk 
is one in a million. That's a compli- 
ment you would expect from one of 
her gym class, isn't it? 

Now, to get down to brass tacks — 
every girl of Washington College is 
a member of the Girls' Inter-Class 
Association. Whether or not you be- 
come active in the Association is en- 
tirely up to you. As one who has 
been closely connected with it for 
several years, I recommend your par- 
ticipation highly. Through athletics, 
you will make friends, learn to be 
good sports, and, incidentally, keep 
that school-girl figure. 

The Board of Managers was a sort 
of mythical connotation to me until 
I discovered that it is merely a group 
of girls who are leaders in campus 
athletics. They help select the Hon- 



orary Varsity teams, carry equip- 
ment for games, and (worst luck), 
sell candy at football games. Tho 
money earned by the Board goes to 
buy blankets as awards to Senhn- 
girls outstanding in athletics. Thesu 
blankets are maroon, bound in black 
with a black "W" in the center. They 
an- grand as an extra blanket in your 
room, so why not start earning those 
points now. 

Ginny Hoopes is the second person 
to whom I wish to introduce you. To 
you who are interested in nthletics:, 
Ginny is a "must know" on your list 
since she is the president of the G. I. 
A. A. 

After hockey is over, we start right 
into basketball and badminton, and, 
as spring steps in, we step out fjr 
tennis and archery. Tournaments 
are held each spring in badminton, 
archery, and tennis and every girl is 
invited to take part. Participation 
and placement in these tournaments 
are a great help toward your thous- 
and point sweaters. 

Well, it won't be long before wo 
meet on the hockey field, so, if you 
see the Seniors puffing down the field, 
it won't be their age. They're just 
worn out from summer vacation. 



— oo- 



Dr. John A. Wagner, '34, has pre- 
sented to the Library a collection of 
forty volumes, most of them by 
French classic authors. 



The- 

CHESTERTOWN 
LIGHT 

AND 

POWER 
COMPANY 

83 £8 £8 £8 £8 £8 88 S3 S3 £8 
88 88 

83 WELCOMES 88 

88 88 

69 88 S3 83 88 83 £8 £8 £8 £8 

The 
Freshmen 



Edwin Ohler Ex- 
Editor Of ELM 
Is Engaged 

Edwin Allen Ohler, '40, former ed- 
itor of the ELM and a member of the 
Kappa Alpha Fraternity became en- 
gaged to Miss Doris Hess of Western 
Maryland College this summer. 

Mr. Ohler, who is doing graduate 
work in biology at Tulane Universi- 
ty, will be accompanied to that school 
this fall by his fiancee who will also 
do graduate work. 



HADAWAY GROCERY 
Meats and Vegetables 

Phone 37 
Cross Street, Chestertown 




ANTHONY'S 

FLOWERS 

For 

All Occasions 



Phone 283 



Telegraph Service 



PAGE EIGHT 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19. 1941 



'Red Star* scores a 

touchdown everytime . . . . 



Excuse us if we seem to be a little football-minded 
so early in the season. But we have been connected 
with your college for so long that each year when 
September rolls around we get the football itch. 

You see, it is our pleasure to supply those fine, big 
spacious and comfortable buses that take the Wash- 
ington Athletes to and from many events away from 
home. 

And boy it tickles our old hearts to bring home the 
bacon. 



Eastern Shore's only Bus Line. Serves practically every 
town on the Peninsula. Connects at Baltimore and 
Philadelphia with National T railway Bus System for 
any point in the United States. 



Red Star Motor Coaches, Inc. 

A SAFE TRANSPORTATION 




FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE NINE 



CAMPUS CAMERA 




WORLD'S CHAMPION 
COLLEGIATE COMMUTER.' 

CAPT. CARL F BRUCE Of UNHED AIR 
LINES MAKES A DAILY ROUND TRIP OF 
1500 MILES FROM OAKLAND CAI IF TO 
SEATTLE, WASH ,ON HIS REGULAR 
FLISHTS AND ATTENDS CLASSES AT 
THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON.' 





ONE 1 IN A THOUSAND.' 

OF 1000 FRESHMEN EMTERINS 
C.CN.V'S MAIN CENTER THIS 
YEAR, FRANCES COTT WAS THE 
ONLY GIRL. SHE IS STUDYING 
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ' 



Freshman Class Interesting; 
Sons Of Famous Men, Non- 
Related Twins; Others 



Among the students enrolled in 
this year's Freshman Class are Rob- 
ert G. Grove and Valentine W. Lentz, 
Jr. Interestingly enough, Grove, whn 
is the son of the famous "Lefty" 
Grove is not a left-hander. Lentz 
is the son of the well-known "Dutch" 
Lentz, basketball coach at the United 
States Military Academy. 

Vying for honors as the one who 
comes from the furthest distance 
re Wayne G. Barker who prepared 
for college at Balboa Heights, Canal 
Zone and at Roosevelt High, Honolu- 
lu, Hawaii, and Robert Horsfield who 
is a graduate of Epsom College in 
England. Also a long way from 
home is Charles A. Goberman who 
prepped at -Stanton Military Academy 
■nd at the Florida Naval Academy at 
Ilatona Beach. 

Among the twins of the Freshman 
Class who are of no relation are two 
Hitchcocks, two Berrys, and two Eng- 
lishes. The Johnsons far outnumber 
the Smiths and Joneses of the Class 
if '45. 

The only brother and sister act is 
lerfoimed by Omile Johnston, Jr., 
Hid Joan Johnston, of EJlicott City, 
Md. Most of their prep work was 
done in St. Louis, Missouri. 

Among the legacies of the Fresh- 
en Class are Hess, brother of Ogle 
"ess, Class of '41, who, among other 
things was President of Lambda Chi 
Alpha and editor of the Pegasus; Rob- 
t Horowitz, brother of Leon Horo- 
witz, class of '38, who was president 
f the Student Council and captain ot 
'he basketball team; Marie Thornton, 
ter to Ralph Thornton and Maigar- 
' rhornton; and Marie Ocker who is 
:i niece to Wendell O. Allen, class of 
'2, and a cousin to Hershel Allen, 
'ast president of Kappa Alpha. 

Worthy of note are Dorothy Pri- 
Kll, of Gittings, Maryland, who ju^t 
nade the city papers with her work at 
l! 'e Timonium Fair and Helen M. 
Newton who is the daughter of the 
"dispensable "Chief." 

Fiain-es Goodwin, an occupant of 

P c 'd Hall is no relation to our own 

Professor Francis Goodwin of the 

'Conomies Department. 

Note to the boys: "Love Thy 



Neighbor." Grace P. Neighbor can 
be reached at Reid Hall. Telephone 



Faculty Members 
Doing Things; 
Going Places 

It is always of great interest to the 
students when faculty members go 
places and do things. However, 
there are some few who must stay at 
home and keep the College running 
even during the summer. Among 
those stay-at-homes was Dr. Gilbert 
W. Mead who took but a week's vaca- 
tion in West Virginia. Dr. Howell, 
Coach Kibler, Coach Ekaitis, Profes- 
sor Solandt {with the exception of a 
trip to the hospital), and Dr. Snyder 
were also numbered with those "at 
home." Professor Goodwin was one 
of those away ot home. Through- 

out the summer he covered the field 
for the College. 

Among those who taught during 
the summer were Dr. Cole at Alfred 
University in New York. Dr. Buxton 
and Dr. Coop taught chemistry and 
physies respectively for the Defense 
Education Program at Pennsylvania 
State University, 

Dr. Corrington, after a month's 
tour of New Mexico and Colorado, re- 
turned home to check the final proof.--, 
on his new book whicht will be releas- 
ed in the near future. 

Dr. Tolles and Dr. Davis spent the 
summer at a boys' camp in Forest 
Lake, N. Y., where Dr. Tolles was the 
Assistant Director of the camp and 
Dr. Davis was the Riding Instructor. 

Thoi;e traveling and their destina- 
tions were Dr. Jones, Ocean City; Dr. 
Ford, Canada; Miss Snodgrass, New 
Brunswick; Dean Bradley, Texas and 
northern New York; Dr. Robinson, 
upper New York; Dr. Werner, New 
England; and Mr. Libby, Maine. 

Dr. Snyder stayed at home and be- 
came the proud papa of a baby boy. 



Ted Husing. . . 

(Continued from Page 4) 
invented a gadget called an annunci- 
ator. It cost CBS $800 to build. On- 
ly Ted and assistant Jimmy Dolan can 
figure out its complicated push but- 
tons and flashing bulbs; the buttons 
are used to manipulate the lights r.o 
that Ted can visualize each play and 
report that play to the radio audi- 
ence. Jimmy watches the game 
through powerful field glasses, and he 
relates all substitutions and details 
to his partner. Ted fingers the an- 
nunciator and describes in orderly 
form the chaos which surrounds a 
football game. His rapid fire deliv- 
ery is as quick and as sure as an All- 
American's bullet pass. 

College students like Husing. One 
exception to this are 'the men and 
women of Ohio State. This Big Ten 
school dreads Husing, because 1 1 
Ohio State, Ted is a jinx. For seven 
straight years State lost every game 
that Ted handled. Then he picked a 
breather and the Buckeyes nosed out 
their opponents. But the very next 
year, the boys from Columbus em- 
barrassed Husing again by losing a 
major game to a Big Ten rival. 

Radio listeners take his broadcast 
very seriously. After one big gam... 
Ted was confronted in his hotel room 
by four subway alumni. 

"Looka here, Husing," one of them 
bellowed. "Ya can't call our team 
names and get away with it." 

"What have I done this time," 
sighed Ted. 

"What have you done!" screanud 
the most belligerent of the four. 
"Why you call us 'unorthodox', that's 
what, and you better take it back." 

P. S. He did. 

Dean F. G. Livingood was recog- 
nized by his Alma Mater, Albright 
College, with the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws at the recent com- 
mencement. 



Blue Ridge In 
Season's Opener 

New Windsor, Md., Blue Ridg. 
College announced its football lean 
would meet Albright College at Rear! 



ing. Pa., tonight, September 19 to 
fill an open date caused when the 
West Chester Teachers were forced 
to cancel their game with the Blue 
and White. 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



CHESTERTOWN 

BANK 

OF 

MARYLAND 



SXXXXXNXXXXXSXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 

NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



MON. - TUES. - WED., SEPT. 22-23-24 

SPENCER TRACY 
LANA TURNER - INGRID BERGMAN 

"DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE" 

Three great stars . . . the director of 
"Gone With The Wind" ... in the greatest 
of all dramatic thrillers. 

THUR. - FRI. - SAT., SEPT. 25-26-27 

BIG DOUBLE FEATURE ATTRACTION 

Frank Lloyd's Biggest Hit 

"THIS WOMAN IS MINE" 

Starring — 

FRANCHOT TONE - CAROL BRUCE 

WALTER BRENNAN - JOHN CARROLL 

—Plus— 

JOHNNY MACK BROWN in 

"MAN FROM MONTANA" 



—NEXT ATTRACTION— 
"LADY BE GOOD" 

— «-with — 
Eleanor Powell - Ann Sothern 
Robert Young - Lionel Barrymore 
XXVXXXXXXXXX\XXXXXX%XX*XXX\XXV\X*XXXXXXXVXNXXX*XX' 



Ujp* 



0$K 



A^ 





If you haven't yet heard of Paca's, 
won't you drop into our shop some- 
time soon. We make every effort 
to please our patrons from Wash- 
ington College . . . and we believe 
you will find, here, all the leading 
fashions being worn by young wom- 
en of distinction. Our prices are 
reasonable and within your budget. 

PACA'S 

A SMART SHOP FOR WOMEN 

HIGH STREET, CHESTERTOWN 



PAGE TEN 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



German Prof 
Welcomes Every 
Student 



by Dr. Davit 

The first of a series of articles in 
foreign languages. Next week, a 
column in French by Prof. Solandt. 

Jetzt sind die hen-lichen FerientJ 
age vorbei. Von schonen Snmerta- 
gen an der See, im Gebirge, oder ZU 
House kehren jetzt alle Studenten in 
Klasscnzimmer und Lcvhsale zuruck. 
Haben Sip cine lanpe Reise gemacht, 
oder sind Sie einfach zu Hause ireb- 
lieben, wo man im Schatten auf dem 
Rasen, ein interessantes Bucb in der 
Hand, manch schone Stunde hat ver- 
brigen konnen. Immerhin, we Sic | 
auch waren, kommen Sie alle Jetztl 
naeh Chestertown, wo Sie den Winter 
durch gemutlich zusammen leben,| 
flcissig atudieren, und auch hie und 
da zur Erholung sich lustig amusierenj 
wollen. 

Nach der Freshman Woche, in der 
die Anfanger in das vielseitige Col- 
leEeleben eingefuhrt werden, werden 
sip wohl an das ernste Lernen denken 
und Ihren Studienplan aufsetzen mus- 
sen. Daruntev wird wohl eine frem- 
de Spraehe sein, ob Lateinisch, Fran- 
zosisch, Spanish oder Deutsch (Gott 
sei dank, brauehen Sie noch nicht 
Chinesisch zu studieien), denn nach 
den Vorschriften mussen Sie wen li- 
stens eine fremde Spraehe bclee;en. 
Wie Sie alle wissen, spielen die mod- 
ernen Sprachen eine immer grossere 
Rolle in unserem heutigen Leben. 
Daher ist es das Biel tier Abteilung 
fur Fremdsprachen den Students 
nicht nur eine Kenntnis der Spraehe, 
sondern auch einen Begriff der Kul- 
tur des fremden Landes zu geben. 
Politische Parteien unci Regierungen 
kommen und gehen, aber es gibt in 
jedem Lunde ewige Kulturwerte, von 
denen jedcr gebildete Mensch wissen 
soil. 

HofFentlich finden Sie das Studiuni 
der Sprachen nicht zu sehwer. Mark 
Twain sngte einmal, als er Deutsch 
lernte: "Wenn die deutsche Spraehe 
nicht vcreinfacht wurde, wurde sie 
in das Reich der toten Sprachen ver- 
bannt, denn nur die Toten wurden 
Zeit finden, die deutsche Spraehe zu 
lcaen." Aber die heutigen Sprach- 
methoden sind ganz anders als zur 
Zeit Mark Twains, und wenn Sie 
tuchtig studicren wollen, konnen Sie 
binnen eines verhaltnismassig kurzen 
Zeitraums, eine fremde Spraehe erler- 
nen, 

Wir heissen Sie alle willkommcn 
und wunsehen Ihnen viele frohe 
Stunden auf Washington College, 
sowohl bei der Arbeit wie bei der 
Brholung. 



New Styles Are 
Sweet, Simple 

"Sweet and Simple" is- the keynote 
to the college girls wardrobe this 
season. Frills are definitely out and 
simple details such as the long torso 
and the soft shoulder lines are the 
newest trends. Serviceable mater- 
ials, easily obtainable in our own 
country are taking the place of im- 
ported silks. Sheer wools and vel- 
veteens in the newest shades are "t!ie 
thing" for "date" and "tea" dresses. 
Black and red is the smartest of the 
new color combinations. Spoi t 

clothes boast flashy wool plaids — 
plaid skirts, jackets, and jerkens are 
becoming more popular every day. 
The old stand-by, corduroy is rapid- 
ly becoming "tops" in skirts and 
suits. 

The inevitable skirt and sweater 
combinations are still the college 
girls' favorites for classes. The new 



Freshman Handbook Is More 
Complete But Contains Errors 



Due to a great delay, several inac- 
curacies and typographical errors 
have crept into the Freshman Hand- 
book this year. However, the reader 
can find some compensation for these 
mistakes in the more complete cov- 
erage of this year's edition. 

Elroy G. Boyer, who was appointed 
by the President of the Y. M. C. A. 
to edit this year's book, was unable to 
collect his information as soon as he 
had anticipated and was forced, in 
order to meet his deadline, to hurry 
through the final proofs, thus allow- 
ing several typographical errors to 
slip into the reading matter. 

However, credit is due the editor 
for a better arrangement of material. 
Noticeable also, is the thoroughness 
of the section on sports. Valuable 
indeed is the insertion of the sche- 



izations listed. This constitution 
concerns only a minority group and is 
not worthy of the space it takes. As 
for the songs and yells in the back, 
many of them are inaccurate and of 
all those printed, there are only four 
that are ever used. They could be 
very worthy of their space but un- 
used material is valueless. 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

s 



e r vie e 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 



ckline has been borrowed | dules for the coming season. 



from the boy-friend's sweater and 
will be seen in every color — topped 
by a "V" neck collar set. Three 
strand pearls have been replaced by 
the new fad of long, single strand 
pearls or novelty beads. 

A campus "evtra" will include an 
encore of last year's introduction of 
knee-high boots with this year's addi- 
tion of cowboy details. 

The simpler things of life have in- 
spired the new "mop" gloves and 
from our mothers' school days, the 
middy blouse and pleated skirt has 
been revived. Saddle shoes are still 
good, even dirty ones, and strollers 
have hit a new sales record. Hats 
are no longer the foolish ones that 
the boys will laugh at; they are eith- 
er sweet as the poke bonnet or simple 
as the new Eaton cap which faintly 
resembles the old "gait" hat. 

Alligator is gaining popularity for 
shoes and pocketbooks to match. All 
in all the college girl sets the pace 
in fashions and this year she votes for 
"sweet and simple" clothes one hun- 
dred percent. 



The road running between the 
dormitories and Dr. Mead's home was 
resurfaced during the summer. The 
road was improbed temporarily ;i 
year ago and completed with a hard 
surface in June. 



What Milady 
Of College Is 
To Dress In 

Since the fall of Paris, New York 
has become the fashion center, and 
Uncle Sam has taken the lead in the 
fashion world. American designers 
are showing the Pariseans that the 
war situation necessitates the change 
from spectacular clothes to good and 
wearable ones. They are less dra- 
matic and more serviceable. 

This year the materials used are 
American made except the lames. 
More wools and velveteens are being 
used since there is a scarcity of silk 
and silk products. 

Milady must change her wardrobe 



"The Washington Players' performance has Im- 
proved to such a degree that it is now said to provide 
a maximum in entertainment/' 

— Reprint from last year's ELM — 

For Real Enjoyment 

The Washington 
Players 

—See- 
MaC Maguire 

FOR YOUR SEASON TICKET 



Most noticeable of all, perhaps, is 
the size. Although it follows the 
example set by last year's book, it has 
been found that the larger book is 
more satisfactory than the vest-pock- 
et editions issued by other schools. 
Washington College is perhaps the 
only college to have a Freshman 
Handbook of this size. The printing, 
which was done by the Queen Anne's 
Record and Observer Publishing 
Company of Centreville, is clear, 
concise and easily readible. It is al- 
very attractive. 

Two seemingly unnecessary sec- 
tions of the book are those containing 
the constitution of the Y. M. C. A. 
and the songs and yells of the col- 
lege. There is apparently no more 
reason for printing the constitution 
of the Y. M. C. A. than there is in 
printing the constitutions of any or 
all of the fifteen other campus organ- 



for national defense. No more siik 
stoekings are to be made, but thanks 
to the scientist, she has Nylon to re- 
ly upon. Experimentations on cot- 
ton may produce a new material for 
this purpose. Very attractive hose 
may be had in cotton mesh and at a 
surprisingly low price. 

The famous "V" for victory has 
become a fad in almost every phase 
of the fashion world. "V" pins in 
every shape and form are very pop- 
ular and loolt very attractive on suits 
and dresses. Hats are trimmed with 
this famous design and even hat trims 
are shaped in a "V". Necklaces, 
gloves and pocketbooks carry tracts 
of the same. 




Supplying You 

With 

Everything 
You Need 

IS OUR JOB 



And if we were asked to list 
each item we can supply it 
would take a couple of pages in 
The Elm. 



5c To 

H.00 

STORE 



A COMPLETE 

TYPEWRITER 
SERVICE 

Before you start the busy college season we would suggest that you get 
your typewriter completely overhauled and cleaned. If done the 
Royal way we guarantee it to be like new. 

We also supply any type of service for any kind of typewriter. Per- 
haps you would be interested in renting a machine. 
Just let us know your wants and we'll deliver the goods. 

Cecil C. MacNutt - District Salesman For 
ROYAL TYPEWRITER COMPANY 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 

For Local Service Call At 
THE WASHINGTON ELM OFFICE 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 







When Away From Home 

Why Not Still Enjoy 

A Home-Cooked 

Meal. 

Our prices are reason- 
able, and if the food or 
service is not satisfactory, 
please tell US. 

Open 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. 

Your Patronage 
Appreciated 

KENT 
GRILLE 

CHESTERTOWN 



Lay- A- Way 

Jewelry 
Gifts 

For 
Christmas 

We invite your consid- 
eration in making this 
your headquarters for 
Jewelry Gifts for all oc- 
casions. 

Why not start now to 
lay-a-way Christmas gifts 
for the girl friend, boy 
friend or the rest of the 
family ? It's an easy way 
... try it. 

Expert 
Watch 

and 

Jewelry 
Repairing 

NELSON J. 
FORNEY, JR. 

(Successor To J. S. Kreeger) 

NEXT TO GILL'S 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



"Y's" Organize 
Branch Of War 
Relief Society 

It has been suggested by Dr. Fred 
J. Kelly, Chief, Division of Higher 
Education of the U. S. Office of Ed- 
ucation, that the following statement 
-senL by President Franklin D. Roose- 
velt to the twenty-fourth annual con- 
vention of the American College Pub- 
licity Association, be called to the at- 
tention of students who are undecid- 
ed about continuing their college 
course. 

President Roosevelt writes: 

"The message I would emphasize 
to you this year is that America will 
alwnys need men and women with 
college training. Government and 
industry alike need skilled technicians 
today. Later we shall need men and 
women of broad understanding and 
special aptitudes to serve as leaders 
of the generation which must man- 
age the post-war world. We must, 
therefore, redouble our efforts dur- 
ing these critical times to make our 
schools and colleges render ever more 
efficient service in support of our| 
cherished democratic institutions. 



PAGE ELEVEN 



America Needs 
College Men 

A Certificate of Ordination <o 
Priesthood in the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church, issued Aujrtist 7, 1785. 
and a number of sermons from the 
pen of this priest have been obtained 
as a loan to the Bunting Library 
Musuem through the cooperation of 
Mrs. Joseph R. Wilson, of Baltimore. 
The papers belong to Mrs. William 
Randolph, of Baltimore, and her son 
of Little Rock, Arkansas. 

In accepting the Certificate and the 
sermons as a loan, it has been under- 
stood that they will be returned to 
Colin Ferguson Randolph, the son of 
Mrs. William Randolph, when he be- 
comes of age, if he so wishes. 

The sermons were written by Colin 
Ferguson, the second Principal of 
Washington College. His tenure of 
office was from 1789 to 1806. 



nei discusses the recording of poetry 
as read by the authors themselves and 



The current number of "The Key 
Reporter", the news magazine of Phi 
Beta Kappa, carries an article by Dr 
H. O. Werner of the Washington Col by ohter wl ' iters fo1 ' Phonographic 
lege Department of English. Undtr reproduction, Dr. Werner is a col- 
the title, "Poets on Record", Dr. Wer lector of such records. 



OTIS'S 
Barber Shop 

WISHES YOU 

A SUCCESSFUL 

COLLEGIATE YEAR 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber, Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone 5 



PARENTS- 
while IN TOWN STOP AND 
REST AT— 

THE SOPHIE FISHER 

Rooms With Private Bath Dining Room 

Route 213 



IN EVERY DIRECTION . . . 

You Can 
Hear Some 
Word Of 
Praise . . . 




of the type of printing we are doing. 
We can't help but feel proud when 
folks tell us how tickled they are 
with our creative designs and excel- 
lent printing craftsmanship. 



We are particularly pleased in hav- 
ing the privilege of doing some of 
the Washington College printing. 



To Editor Jones, Business Manager 
Johnson and their staff, we extend 
our best wishes for a banner year 
in their work at "The Elm" this 
year. ..Good luck . . . and thirty. 



The Queen Anne's 
Record & Observer 

Publishing Company 



PHONE ONE 



Centreville 



Maryland 



PAGE TWELVE 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 19, 1941 



NORTHEAST CORNER 



What To Do About It? 

Colleges the country over are open- 
ing this month in an atmosphere of 
uncertainty. It is impossible t<> fovv 
see the events of the next few 
months, and as an almost ine- 
vitable re-ult, there is unrest and 
questioning. Few persons would go 
so far as to express fear that colleges 
would have to suspend operations for 
the duration of the emergency, for 
not even embattled England has gone 
to that extreme. Certainly the cur- 
rent outpouring of a million and a 
half young people from their homes 
to the college and university class- 
rooms proves that education is still a 
going concern, and in a very large 
way. 

It would be stupid to say that edu- 
cation (or any normal human activi- 
ty) can hang out the "business as us- 
ual" sign, and forget or overlook the 
conflagration now raging over much 
of the world's surface. That is the 
other extreme, and is just as foolish 
and blind a viewpoint. 

This is certainly not the first time 
that the world cry has been "What 
are we going to do about it?" Suc- 
ceeding generations over and over 
have heard that recurrent cry. A bit 
of cool thinking and a reasonable 
knowledge of history will show us 
that the crises have been met as they 
have arisen, and while a few are 
shouting "What to do?" a majority 
has been doing the daily job which 
finnlly brought the desired end. 

This is probably the world's great- 
est example of a war of ideas. The 
suppressors act on the theory that 
their battle will be largely won if 
they can rid themselves of people of 
contrary opinions, or can dispose of 
such opinions in the minds of their 
people by the substitution of official 
propaganda, to the exclusion of free- 
dom of thought and of opinion. The 
campaign of propaganda has been 
pressed as vigorously as the battle of 
economic or of military weapons. 



In such a world condition, the place 
of the American college ought to be 
clear. Education in the foundations 
of American thought and philosophy 
is a prime necessity. Training in 
clear and logical processes of mind is 
imperative. Preparation is needed 
for the men and the women whose 
1 duty it will be to straighten out the 
tangle which the world will find itseif 
in after the battles cease. Someone 
will have the duty of organizing and 
directing community life in every 
town and village. Countless de- 
mands will have to be met in all fields 
of economics, government, publica- 
tion, preaching, the scientific profes- 
sions, the law, and a hundred other 
activities. 

What to do about it? That is easy 
to answer! Get prepared to help the 
battered world back to sanity and 
safety. Get prepared to help run it 
as intelligence tells us it should be 
run. Here is a challenge to every 
student in every college in America, 
and it means as much to a Freshman 
at Washington College as to a senior; 
and as much to 3 person on this cam- 
pus as to anyone anywhere. 

George Washington wrote to Pres- 
ident William Smith of Washingto 1 
College, in 1789, that "the welfare of 
the state and the happiness of the 
people are advanced or retarded in 
proportion as the morals and educa- 
tion of the youth are attended to." I 
venture that in this present century, 
Washington would not object to add- 
ing "social consciousness" to the moi- 
als and the education be mentioned. 

The Class of 1945 in the American 
collegiate world, enters at a time 
when the clouds hang heavy with evil 
portents. How soon they will lift is 
beyond the power of man to say. But 
we do know that under the shadow 
of that cloud, there is work to be 
done, preparation to be made, a daily 
duty to be performed. 

Duly is not renowned for its glam- 
our. It wears a sober robe. But it 



For The Finest 
Dry Cleaning 

And 

Laundry 
Service 

See Your 
Fellow Student 

PHIL SOUDER 



Representing 



McCORD'S 



C he st ert own^jXLtd^JfP hone 399 

I LMlMiRl-ClESM&ii-SlQmiGF 



is there, nevertheless, and its neglect : 
will finally entail a failure, or a fall- 
ing short, which will suddenly be up-| 
on one, with little or no warning, and, 
with great regrets and disappoini- i 
ments. 

In the midst of it all, there is a I 
place for friendly smiling, for cheer-, 
ful words. Sullenness in any emer- 
gency is an admission of inadequacy! 
to face things clearly. 

Washington College welcomes back 
her sons and daughters of last year, 
and greets with confidence the new 
members who have joined with us in 
this eternal adventure. After a cen- 
tury and three-quarters, Washington 
College still faces forward. 

Gilbert W. Mead. 



With The Greeks 

Alpha Chi Omega 

The largest Alpha Chi convention 
was held at Pasadena, California, and 
the Beta Pi Chapter at Washington! 
College was very proud to have three I 
representatives: Gretchen Smith, Hel- 
en Marie Culver, and Mary Elizabeth' 
Humphreys, the special delegate, 
president of the local chapter. 

There were two special trains one 
running from Chicago and one run- 
ning from New Orleans which were 
filled with about 120 Alpha Chis 
each. The Union Pacific did every 



thing to help make the trip an enjoy- 
able one. They sent two transport 
agents, and a special chef to see ttvit 
the girls were not left in various 
stops along the way and to see that 
at each of these stops they were giv- 
en a varied diet. Some of the more 
interesting were at Salt Lake City 
where the girls stopped for an hour 
at midnight. Some of the Alpha Chis 
at the University of Utah heard that 
the special was running through so 
they came down to the station and 
drove the girls through the city to see 
the Morman Temple and other points 
of interest. The next big stop was 
at Zion National Park where they 
were taken on an all day tour 
through the park and were entertain- 
ed at Cedar Falls and Cedar Lodga 
for luncheon and dinner. 

The five days on the train were 
enformable due to these stops, bridge 
parties, and beauty contests and fchi 
conversations of three of the Found 



ers that the girls almost hated 
leave. 



Zcta Tau Alpha 

Zeta Tau Alpha, for the fourtli 
year, won the inter-sorority scholar 
ship cup. All the members are e 
to get started to add a fifth year \ t 
the list. 

Ellen Peters, accompanied by Jeiu 
Wbeatley and Virginia Cooper - tl 
tended the national Z. T. A. Convei 
tion in Mississippi. Ellen Peters \vi 
the official delegate. Zetas from ev 
ery part of the United States 
Canada were present . 

The Chapter House Party was \w\i 
at Ocean City, Maryland, where 
has been held for many years pay 
It was considered very successful 
I During the first week in Septembei 
the active members were entertainei 
at a party by the Baltimore Alum 
Chapter. 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURAN 

(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 

— For— 

Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



Don't miss SONJA HENIE, star- 
ring in "SUN VAltEY SERENADE" 
a 20th Century-Fox film, with 
Glenn Miller and his band. 

***** 
. . . and don't miss enjoying the 
great combination of tobaccos in 
CHESTERFIELD thai makes if the 
one cigarette that's COOLER WILDER 
and BETTER -TASTING. 



'• > 




, 1% IT ^^mm^M 

iSl\owe/am m 




M;m 



Ifs Chesterfield 



the Right Combination of the World's Best Cigarette 
Tobaccos for a COOLER MILDER Better TASTE 



EVERYWHERE 

YOU 00 




Buy a pack . . . when you light a Chesterfield you 
get an aroma and fragrance so delightful that it's 
enjoyed even by those who do not smoke. 

We spare no expense in making Chesterfield 
the best smoke money can buy . . . from the to- 
bacco inside, right out to the moisture-proof, 
easy-to-open cellophane jacket that keeps 
Chesterfield always Fresher and Cooler-Smoking. 



CpT'iEhl 11H, Li 



8 Micu Te.icc 0"- 



"V" 



TUTU'S 

Ine 




Elm 



"V" 



Vol. XLI. No. 2. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD., FRIDAY, SEPT. 26, 1941 



Price Ten Cents 



"Over 300 Years Of Democracy 
Will Not Be Overthrown" - Mead 



In his address, yesterd 
opening the 160th academic year of 
Washington College, Dr. Mead Iookci 
•ward to seeing an enduring peace 
the end of the present war. It 
to the college student of today to 
prepare himself to take part in the 
past war reconstruction. He was 
particularly enthusiastic about the 
cent meeting in London of many of 
exiled heads of Nazi conquered 
nations. In this momentous confe: 
ence, plans for an enduring European 
peace were discussed. It was Dr 
Mead's opinion that, as the result of 
such an intelligent move and the 
spread of such far-sighted reasoning, 
there would not he another Ver- 
sailles Treaty. This seems to he the 
only way to prevent a war caused by 
unfair conditions being' enforced up- 
on a beaten nation by the victors of a 
.ceding conflict. 

"Never in the history of the world 
s there been such widespread con- 
flagration", he stated. Hitler be- 
lieves that the best way to destroy 
the moral of an enemy army is to de- 
stroy the moral of those behind the 
lines. It was this belief that lead to 
the indiscriminate bombing of Rot- 
terdam — a bombing which, in a few 
hours, almost leveled one of the larg- 
r cities of Europe. 
Differing with President Conant of 
larvard and also the University of 
Pennsylvania Daily, Dr. Mead stated 
that this country need not yet enter 
tho war as a "shooting" participant. 
Remarking that the German way of 
life was "not the American way", he 
continued that "300 years of Democ- 
racy will not be overthrown." The 
United States and the entire Western 
war, 



Losses Do Not 
Down Orchestra 

Loss of several musicians by grad- 
uation, and the withdrawal of Kint- 
ncr and Hockman has weakened the 
orchestra for this year. Dr. Livin- 
good, faculty advisor, hopes to rem- 
edy the situation by the addition of 
new members from the freshman 
class. 

Among Dr. Livingood's plans for 
this year is building a saxophone 
choir, which he hopes will be made 
possible by additional talent being 
supplied by freshmen. It is intend- 
ed for the saxophone section to sup- 
ply the essential strong melodic lead. 

There is dire need of violins and 
trumpets. The withdrawal of Kint- 
ner and Hockman, promotion of Gar- 
rison to student leader, and loss of 
several musicians by graduation, have 
weakened the violin section immense- 
ly. Similarly, the only available 
trumpet player to date is Johnny Rns-j 
sell, local high school student. 

With a view to building up a pian- ! 
st for next year, Emmajo Stubble- 
field is serving as assistant to Sara ; 
Speicher, who will graduate this year, 
having completed four years of ser- 
ice. Dr. Livingood, who is faculty 
dviser to the orchestra, lamented the 
fact that Livingstone will graduate; 
this year since bassoon players are [ 
hard to replace, and the Dean is is-i 
suing a call for any student who' 
plays the "bamboo fishing pole," 
he terms it. 



Hemisphere should "not seek 
should be prepared." 



NEWS ii\ 
BRIEF. . . . 

Automobile Rule Tightened 

Dean Livingood announced that 
he Administration's former policy of 
eniency with regard to enforcing 
egulations governing student car 
owners has been abandoned. The 
Dean made clear the fact that any 
students' automobiles found parked 
illegally in driveways or around fra- 
ternity houses, or parked more than 
three successive days behind William 
Smith Hall, will be towed away and 
-■•tored at the student's expense. 



I Student Leader Garrison plans to 
remedy the situation partially by 
turning the baton over to Dr. Livin- 
good frequently and playing in the 
first violin section himself. Garri- 
son announced that there will defin- 
itely be a string trio and possibly a 
quartet. Organization of a band is 
unlikely this year, Garrison stated, 
since the brass section is weak. 

The orchestra's schedule this year 
will include not only the usual week- 
ly assemblies and annual assembly 
concert but also a Sunday afternoon 
program at the U. S. Veterans Facil 
tha| 



Student Council Committees 

Several important committees wcr 



Faculty Honors 
Awarded To 
Three Seniors 

Three outstanding students were 
awarded scholarships in a Faculty 
meeting on Friday, September 19. 
Based on "scholarship, character, per- 
sonality, and intellectual promise", 
the awards were given to Minor 
Steele, Marjorie Starr, and Rufus 
Johnson. 

Minor Steele, who graduated from 
the Girls' Latin School, in Baltimore, 
was awarded the Burchinal scholar- 
ship. A senior, she is serving her 
second year as President of Alpha 
Omicron Pi. She is also Treasurer 
of the Panhellenic Council, Feature 
Editor of the ELM, a member of the 
Women's Athletic Association Board 
of Managers, Junior Historian of the 
Pegasus, and a member of the Dra- 
matic Club. 

Marjorie Starr, a Galena High 
School graduate, was the woman re- 
cipient of the Board of Visitors and 
Governors scholarship. President of 
the Classical Society, Marjorie holds 
membership in Sigma Sigma Omi- 
cron, Le Cercle Francais, The Mount 
Vernon Literary Society, and the De- 
bate Club. 

Rufus Johnson who was the man a- 
warded the Board of Visitors v and 
Governors Scholarship, graduated 
from Wicomico High School, in Salis- 
bury. Of interest is the fact that his 
brother, Bill, class of '40, also receiv- 
ed this scholarship, Rufus has been 
Secretary and Treasurer of Kappa 
Alpha, a member of Omicron Delta 
Kappa and Sigma Sigma Omicron, 
was twice elected Business Manager 
(Continued on Page 4) 



S. Adalin Mayes, '40, was among 
the graduates of the School of Library 
Science of Drexel Institute of Tech- 
nology, June 16, '41. 



Girls Split On Cut System; 
Men Give General Okay 

by Ellen Peters 

Four out of eight campus leaders who were questioned this 
week approve of the new cut system — three opposed with mod- 
eration and one was emphatically opposed. 

The girls were divided in their opinions and strangely 
enough the boys heartily approved — several went so far as to 
say it would eliminate "gold bricking". Some were skeptical 
— the Editor-in-Chief of the ELM is waiting to see how the new 
system will work, but, so far, he is one who prefers the old sys- 
tem. "I personally, don't like it, but the new system should be 
good" was skeptical Minor Steele's answer. 

'*' Peggy Pitt and Mary Liz Humph- 
ries agree that the new system is de- 
finitely good and that seniors will be 
assuer of enough hours to graduate. 
Basil Clark added "the new system 
is an incentive for lower classmen 
to work into the habit of a good in- 
dex, and, when Juniors and Seniors, 
to have unlimited cuts for a 2.25 in- 
dex". Dave Bartolini believes it is 
a good system for Freshmen and 
Sophomores, but that Juniors and 
Seniors should be allowed unlimited 
cuts — regardless of index. Lloyd 
Davis adds his' approval but believes 
that Assembly should not be compul- 
mence- sory unless one hour a semester be 
given for attendance. The president 
of the YWCA considers the system 
"impractical." 



Hothouse Vital 
To Biology Lab 

Tacked on to the end of the power- 
house building, hidden from the view 
of most of the students, a cozy 8'xl9' 
greenhouse secludes itself. Although 
not intended as such, it now serves 
as a tribute from Dr. Chatters, for- 
mer assistant instructor in biology. 
Dr. Chatters not only worked out the 
plans for its construction but forfeit- 
ed a summer of pleasure in order to 
make certain its existence. 

About a week after 
ment, Dr. Chatters began digging the 
ditch which now constitutes the floor. 
At the completion of this tusk, ce- 
ment blocks and materials for making 
concrete were purchased. With the 
(Continued on Page 4) 



ELM NOTICE 

There will be a short but im- 
portant meeting of the Junior 
and Sophomore Boards of the 
ELM Staff in the ELM office on 
iMonday at 12:45. 



A Freshman Girl And Boy 
Make Daring Revelations 



ity at Perry Point sometime 
spring, Dr. Livingood disclosed. 

At the first meeting on Friday af- 
ternoon the weakness of the violin 
and trumpet sections lowered the 
morale of the orchestra members. 
This is nothing new, however, accord- 
ing to Dr. Livingood, who has "be- 
come used to it after sixteen years" 
and who promises "we will have an 
orchestra this year." 

Members of the orchestra include: 
student leader Mort Garrison; pian- 
ist Sara Speicher; assistant pianist, 
anted at the special meeting of ] Emmajo Stubbleiield; violinists, John- 
Student Council held this week, son, Latham, Dulin, Sharrer, and F. 



th. 

The Freshman Activities Commit- 1 
ee is composed of Lore, Ruff, Boyer, 
toe, and Jackson; the Dining Hall 
Committee — Crane, Clark, Jackson, I 
a nd Mooney; and Crane as chairman 
of the Medical Committee. ThelP 
Council elected Gibe and Macielag to 
serve on the Freshman Discipline 
Committee, 



(Continued on Page 4) 



Smith Head Inter-Frat 



Despite the fact that the enrollment 
"i French classes has declined consid- 
erably in favor of the Spanish cours- 
Dr. Davis' records show that there 
has been no appreciable decline in the 
"umber of students majoring in 
French . 



Donald "Dutch" Smith was elected 
esident of the Inter-f] 
Council for this year by unanimous 
vote at the Council's first meeting 
this week. "Dutch", a senior mem- 
ber of the Council, represents Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha, of which he is vice- 
president. He served last year on 
the Council as secretary-treasurer. 

Rufus Johnson, Kappa Alpha Sen- 
ior representative, was elected vice- 
president. Nelson Kaylor, Thcfa Chi 
Junior representative, was elected 
secretary-treasurer. 



1 Dear Diary, 

I have just undergone one of the 
'unique experiences of my life, and I 
| feel this occasion calls for something 
I a little out of the ordinary as far 
expressing my feelings goes. 

Yes, tonight I went to my first Rat 
meeting and, although I didn't use to 
be the hysterical type, I think that 
my personality is rapidly turning out 
to be just that. Never in my life 
have I felt that uncontrollable desire 
to laugh so strongly as tonight. 

We marched into Reid Hall library 
and sat on the dirty floor. . Those 
high and mighty sophomores sat on 
the comfortable chairs and looked us 
over. I sat there the first few min- 
ues, practically expressionless, while 
various freshmen were asked what the 
score was, which seemed to be a dark 



Rat Hall 

Sept. 22, 1941 

11:00 P. M. 



Reid Rail, R. 6 

Sept. 22, 1941 

11 P. M. 

Dear Diary, 

The first night that I was on the 
campus, I began to hear about the 
coming rat party. There wasn't 
much said, just enough. After a few 
stories about the boys who had their 
heads shaved, the fellow who slept on 
his stomach for two weeks after the 
party, and a few hints that the pad- 
dles we were making were not big 
enough. I began to really worry! 

The days of Freshmen Week 
weren't too busy, so I had plenty of 
time to brood. The ratting up to 
Sunday night seemed to be a threat 
more than actual ratting. It seemed 
that we were being shown what to ex- 
pect. 

A feeling of growing distaste for 
the name Rat, and for the coming 
party reached its climax Saturd 
night. Sunday, things were too 



ternity! mysterious secret. Some surround- j qu j e t. It was truly the calm bef. 
' ing us had to rub the smiles off their th e s torm. 
faces on the floor. 

One Rat clad in her flowing night 
apparel, was forced into a galloping 
Spring dance to the tune of 



Dr. Chas. Clark 
Has Article In 
History Journal 

The current number of the Mary- 
land Historical Magazine, which has 
just arrived in the Library, features 
as its leading article the first of a ser- 
ies under the title, "Politics in Mary- 
ind During the Civil War." The 
uthor is Dr. Charles B. Clark, who 
graduated from Washington College 
1934, and who recently completed 
his doctorate work in the University 
of North Carolina. The series of 
articles will cover the work submitted 
as his doctor's dissertation for the 
Ph. D. by Dr. Clark. 

When in college, "Charley" Clark 

was an outstanding leader, in both 

athletics and non-athletic activities. 

He was a charter member of the 

Sunday night I was in my room byj Washington College circle of ODK, 

ten-thirty with the lights turned out; and received the Porter Character 

and the door closed. At that time | Medal on graduation. Since the 

'God there was comparatively little noise .death of Mr. Porter, the medal has 

Dr. 



Administration Heartily Approves 
The Administration's opinion is de- 
finitely "Yes." Dean Livingood feels 
it will provide a "good stiff penally 
for over cutting", and it will enable 
us to take our place with other col- 
leges having a Dean's List and unlim- 
ited cuts for good students. Dr. 
Mead believes it is for the best inter- 
est of all concerned, and predicted 
that, if necessary, changes will be 
made in the present set-up. He add- 
ed that a Committee of Absences 
composed of Dr. Tolles, Dr. Davis, 
Miss Bradley, and Dr. Livingood has 
been appointed to deal with indivi- 
dual cases. Miss Mattie, when inter- 
viewed, smiled and reserved her 
opinion. 



Bless America", sung by another Ration the campus, and none from Rat 1 been presented annually by 
who didn't appear to be very familiar | Hall. : Clark. He is a brother of Basil 

with "what is what" in the musical | I didn't realize how much time was; Clark, '42, and \isits the campus of- 
world. In fact my face was still just' slipping by, because I was trying to j ten. He is at present a member of 
a little straight when one of my cut- [think of something pleasant. I could) the faculty of West Georgia College, 
est fellow sufferers got up and tried not concentrate on that so I began to: a division of the University of Geor- 
(Continued on Page 3) (Continued on Page 3) ffia. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 26, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 
Established 1782 
Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 

Editorial Staff 



Editor-in-Chief 
Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 

James Aycock 
Molly Blackwood 
Edward Boyer 



Patsy Frary 
Robert Hill 
Frank Macielag 



Business Manager 



J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 
.... Frances Kreeger 

Mary Landon Russell 

Junior Board 
Dian Hubbard Phyllis Peters 

Don McClellan William Roe 

Leonard Parris Naomi Russell 

Ellen Peters 
Sophomore Board 
Henri Pote Gretehen Smith 

Dorothy Reidy John R. Smith 

Norman Sharrer Gaylord Steele 



Business Staff 



Rufus C. Johnson 



Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1941 



Desk Editor For This Issue .*.... E. Peters 

Assistants Aycock, M. Blackwood 



The New Absence System- 
Can It Work? 

Despite the fact that the majority of the campus leaders 
and the entire Administration heartily endorse the new system 
of absences, there seems that there is only one possible thing to 
do and that is to wait and see if it works. Theoretically it is 
sound in that it will eliminate the thing for which it was intend- 
ed, goldbricking. 

However, for one to say at this early date that it is a good 
thing and that it will be successful is basing an opinion on a the- 
ory. There are many possibilities, some of which are probabil- 
ities, that could occur and make this new system somewhat of a 
failure. There is the possibility that a Dean's List will lead to 
indifference and general decline in the grade of work handed in 
by outstanding seniors. There is the possibility that students 
will be subjected to two dollar fines that in all justice they 
should not have to pay. For instance, according to the new 
system, a student may take as many cuts as he has recitations in 
that class in one week. It could occur that a student would be 
sick twice during a semester, through no fault of his own, and 
should he miss his class twice in a one hour course, it would cost 
him two dollars. The same thing could happen in a two or 
three hour course. Certainly, everytime a person is sick, he is 
not goldbricking. 

So, one can see that it is almost impossible to predict suc- 
cess for this new system. The only way to answer a question 
such as that is by "watchful waiting." Theoretically, it is sound 
and should prove successful, but, is it going to work? 



men more cause for excitement and noise than any other during 
the year, I can say they have been darn good sports. 

Although the first morning most of them got up at six so as 
to have time to braid their hair and ran up and down the hall 
exclaiming over the backward state of their costumes, they have 
been comparatively quiet. Somehow Freshmen don't realize 
that upperclassmen like to sleep if they don't have eight 
o'clocks ; we didn't seem to. But there have been no complaints 
as to the noise on the third floor this year; either the Freshmen 
are naturally quiet and cooperative or they're too tired after 
their first days at school to be very active in the hall. 

Whatever it is, if we upperclassmen follow the Freshmen's 
example and then keep them inspired, we could probably have 
a year without any complaints about the noise, — and, incident- 
ally, not so many room-campuses. M. D. B. 



A Letter From A Draftee 



96th Coast Artillery 
Camp Davis, N. C. 

Sep£embcr 20, 1941 
(Afternoon) 
Deai' Honey, 

I am very enthusiastic about army 
life. We get to lie in bed every 
morning until five o'clock. This, of 
course, gives us plenty of time to get 
washed, shaved, dressed, and make 
our bunks, scrub our floors, etc., by 
five-ten. By five-fifteen we stand 
outside and shiver until someone 
blows the hugle. After we are rea- 
sonably chilled, we grope our ' way 
thru the darkness to the mess hall. 
Here we pause for a moment for a 
breakfast consisting of an unidenti- 
fied liquid and a choice of white or 
rye crust. 

After gorging ourselves upon this 
delectable repast, we waddle our way 
back to the barracks. We now have 
nothing to do until seven-thirty, so 
wc just sit around and scrub toilets, 
empty garbage cans, wash windows 
and pick up all the cigarette butts, 
match sticks and old paper within a 
radius of two-hundred yards of our 
barracks. 

Soon the Sergeant conies in and 
smilingly says, "Ah, my little chums, 
you must come out in the sunshine 
and play." So we go out to bask in 
the wonderful sunshine. Of_c.ourse, 
we stand in six inehes of mud. Then 
to limber up we do a few simple calis- 
thenics like touching your toes with 
both feet off the ground, and holding 
yourself out at arm's length. 

At ejght o'clock we put on a light 
pack and start walking off to the 
mountains. New honey, the light 
pack is not to be confused with the 
heavy pack. The light pack includes 
only a gun, bayonet, canteen, mess- 
kit, coat, towel, extra pair of shoes, 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Ttownbcat 



by Marty Warther 



From What Source Will 
Armed Conflict Come ? 



Another summer has seen r 
tunes and different bands rise and 
bask in the glory of vacation time. 
Hollywood had Glenn Miller and 
"You and I", the Meadowbrouk hac 
Sunny Dunham and "Throwing Pcb 
bles in the Millstream", New York 
had Tommy Dorsey and "I Guess I'll 
Have to Dream the Rest", Chicago 
had Charlie Spivak and "It's So 
Peaceful In The Country". Surpr 
ingly, Baltimore enjoyed the stay of 
two new young bands — Louis 
Prinia's first full orchestra and the 
climbing Dean Hudson's Orchestra 
Both of these bands contributed some- 
thing to our summer songs. The 
pianists of these two orchestras are 
very talented and versatile — compos- 
ing and arranging as well as playing. 
Bob HartsL'll of the Hudson band 
wrote "Holly Hop", a jump tunc that 
caused new orders in the Baltim 
record shops. This number is to be 
recorded by Woody Herman, also. 
Sol Marcus, Prinia's pianist, is the 
reason everyone is singing "I Don't 
Want To Set The World On Fii 
Sol, who always has an unfinished 
score before him, wrote this melody 
two and a half years ago. Now it is 
setting the musical world on fire. 

One of the summer's outstanding 
pleasures has been the Gene Krupa 
Orchestra featuring that amazingly 
dextrous Roy Eldridge. You al 
know "Let Me Off Uptown". Krupi 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Timely Comments On The Draft 
By An Interested Student 



As colleges throughout the country commence their third 
year of instruction since the present war began what a change 
has taken place in America's attitude and participation in the 
struggle! From neutrality to lend-lease to exchange of ships 
for bases to occupation of Iceland to a 'shooting war'. It's the 
last action that is cause for much comment. 

Our ships are ordered to shoot first in order to keep the line 
open to England and Russia. Undoubtedly some of these ships J 
will be sunk. If retaliation by our administration is war, then| 
the American public is being misguided as to why armed con-; 
flict? This is not the reason for involving us in war and the] 
public should not be led to think along such lines. Is the spread] 
of Nazism reason for us to go to war? If it is we should do so| 
at once and allied with Great Britain be able to get a stronghold' 
on the European continent while Germany is occupied on thej 
eastern front. If Hitler thought we would do this, he no doubt, 
would not have engaged in war with Russia. Or should we on- 
ly continue to strengthen our fortifications and make new ones 
on the western hemisphere and nearby islands and be ready if 
Hitler attacks America? 

Regardless of your opinion as to these questions, if we go 
to war let us not be led to think that actions against our ships 
will be the spark as was in World War I, but that there is a real 
underlying cause; that is, destruction of Nazism. B. C. C. 



A Compliment To Mice 
From Reid Hall 



The first honors of the year should go to the Reid Hall 
branch of the Freshman class. Naturally, we can't comment 
on the boys' conduct as we're sort of not allowed in their dorms, 
but from having lived through Rat Week, which gives the fresh- 



by Jim Aycock 

When the Selective Service^ Act 
was passed by Congress, a wave of 
indignation and protest swept the 
country. However, such feelings 
stopped when the nation settled back 
and considered the conditions that 
had made such a drastic step seem 
necessary. The American people as 
a whole soon realized the tenseness 
of the situation and decided that it 
was only common sense to arm for 
defense. The draftee who was forc- 
ed to give up his position to serve his 
country realized that his employer 
would have his old job waiting for 
him or that the government would 
see that he was employed upon the 
completion of his training period. 
The college student, however, was 
faced with a different and more com- 
plex problem. Suppose a youth had 
gone to high school for four years, 
graduated, attended college for two 
or three years, then had to stop his 
education to serve in the army. Like 
everyone else, the undergraduate is 
glad to be of service to his country, 
He is acquainted with the seriousness 
of world affairs and agrees that the 
draft is probably the best method of 
remedying the weakness of trainci: 
man-power in this country, but he al 
so realizes that the odds are against 
his ever completing his college edu- 



TIMELY 
TOPICS 



Perhaps the spots on the sun or 
moon arc responsible for this bellta 
nt atmosphere throughout the 
•Id. The latest is that it hns evejj 
hit Washington College. First, there 
were the Freshmen girls, egged on h] 
certain handsome "yes-men" Juniovi 
who threatened to revolt from thi 
menacing antics of the Sophs. Now 
the Frosh boys arc complaining thm 
the ratting by the Sophs is becoming 
unbearable and 25 per cent of then 
are threatening to transfer or just 
plain end their college careers. Ji.nl 
plain talk? Well, your guess 
good as mine. 'Tis reported true, 
however, that certain Frosh boys nr« 
on the "hands off" list because of v:i 
ious fraternal reasons. 



Several of the respected groups of 
the campus are demanding apologia 
from the ELM. We are very sor 
indeed, that the A. O. Pi Sorority \ 
unable to get its news in in time for 
the last issue of the ELM, thus, 
omission. Our deadline for that 
copy is three o'clock Wednesday 
from now on. If it's in by that tintfl 
the ELM will be glad to print it. Thi 
YMCA and Handbook officials are de- 
manding an explanation to the 
dents for certain typographical 
rors in the Handbook. They wish il 
be known that they were not direetlj 
responsible for the errors since 
were the editors, and not they. All 
they did was to hand the copy in lalt 
enough to cause the rush which 
suited in tho3e errors. Therefore, 
they wish it be known that they wen- 
only the indirect cause for them. 



HI 



cation if it is interrupted by service 
in the army. Conditions after the 
last war confirm his fears. Verj 
few of the undergraduates who flock 
ed to the colors during World War ] 
ever returned to complete their 
course of study. 

A youth of twenty-one, when forc- 
ed to leave college to become a so!' 
dier, has every intention of returning 
as soon as possible to complete his 
education and to receive his degree. 
However, when his time in the army 
is completed, he hears of the scarci- 
ty of workers and the excellent op 
portunity to make money. It sounds 
logical — fewer workers, higher pay. 
He applies for a position, seriously 
intending to work for only one year, 
two at the most. Despite these good 
intentions, complications set in. Per- 
haps he falls in love and marries, or 
decides to continue to make money 
while he can — rather than take the 
chance of being unable to obtain 
work when he graduates. Conse- 
quently he fails to return to college. 
All the money and time which he had 
given to previous undergraduate 
study is wasted. Not only will the 
individual fail to obtain a higher ed- 
ucation, but the country will find it- 
self facing a shortage of college 
trained men. At the present time 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Sprains and injuries about the 1 
seem to be catching. Mr. Coleman, 
Librarian, is in the hospital with 
sprained ankle while at the sari 
time, Miss Mattie and Miss Howat 
are suffering from the same ailmem 
A Freshman girl is limping for thai 
reason while Mrs. Jones, as the result 
of a fall, is reported to have a bi 
case of bruised knees ... No bad t 
ports have come from the closing ol 
the Reserved Book Shelves. Per 
haps that is the solution to all th< 
difficulties . . . Circulation of th( 
SUNPAPERS around Chestertowi 
must have increased over the 
mer. On Monday, the Evening SOI 
carried an 8-column picture spreai 
of Washington gridders with 
ble-column story attached . . . What': 
this we hear about the tightening u| 
on the automobile rules. We under 
stand that u car parked on the 
pus that is found to be improper!) 
registered in the Dean's office will b 
towed down town and stored at tb 1 
student's expense. 



Overheard in Rat Hall: "Miss Mai 
tie certainly is swell." My, but h<>' 
quickly those Freshmen do catch oc 
. . . We propose a "Promotion 
Homecoming Spirit" Club. It's nd 
ed and Coach Ekaitis and the boj 
are working like heck every day t 
do their part in making a successfc 
day of it. Why not have the Inter 
fraternity Council offer prizes for tb 
best decorated frat house on that da 
and to the frat having the most aluff 
ni back. The same could go for th 
sororities ... I see by the GOLI 
BUG that Maud Lee, Mickey, and tfc 
gang are still enjoying the gril 
Western Maryland. I wonder whe 
Washington College will ever 
one . . . Miracles never cease. Tc 
dining hall has been open for o*er 
week and as yet we haven't heard f><> 
gripe from the waiters against 
new head waiter. Looks like Atlt 
is the man for the job. 

A new fangle crept into the 
ting Wednesday after lunch. T 
(Continued on Page 4) 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 26, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Sho'men Shape Up Well 
In Pre-Season Practice 



With two weeks remaining before 
Johns Hopkins invades Kibler Field, 
the Sho'incn have been .shiipinn up 
i well in prc-scason drill?. Body 
contact lias been inaugurated during 
the past week and, while this is go- 
ing on, Coach Ekoitis keeps his fing- 
ers crossed against the chance of in- 
jury to the team. 

This year's team will not suffer, as 
have teams in the past, due to lack of 
experience, Composed entirely of 
seasoned veterans such as Ray Kirby 
and Al Dudderar, the team should 
ik on both offense and defense. 
Along with these two will be Frank 
Gibe, who won a varsity berth last 
• as a Freshman; and Wilson Rei- 
dy and Ray Sinclair, two 190 pound 
hoy:, who will probably take care of 
the tackle positions. On the wings 
ill Ije Bill Benjamin and Marty War- 
fcher, who^are both adept at snaring 
passes and are wide awake on de- 
fense. 

Yerlcei — Field General 

A new offense built around Lou 
Ycrkes, who will be the field general 
for the coming season, will be strong- 
er than in previous years. The sys- 
tem introduced by Cpach Ekaitis will 
consist of flankers, reverses, and a 
dangerous overhead game. Lou, who 
do almost anything on the foot- 
field,, will probably kick, run, 
and pass. Assisting him will be 
II" Messick, who will hold down 
(he fullback spot and do most of the 
plunging. The wingback spot will be 

hard one to decide, for Omar Jack- 
son, Hal Freeman, and Stoney Mc- 
Laughlin are all capable of filling this 
position. The blocking-back spot 
will be held down by Frank Macielag 
and Bill Hoban. 



Replacenr 



Strong 



The replacements will be more am- 
ple than in previous years, with up- 
perclassmen Storm, Benjamin, 

randt, Slade, Dougherty, Williams, 
Morgan, Sohl, and Conant ready for 
action. Such promising freshmen as 
Mackrell, Grey, Svec, Loll, and Hitch- 
cock will further bolster the Maroon 
replacement strength. 

Svec and Loll should provide plen- 
ty of competition for the end posi- 
tions. Svec was All-Maryland for 
Baltimore Poly last year. Although 
not impressively large, he looks like 
exceptionally capable defense 
player. Loll, who played with 
Bridgeton High, is catching on to col- 
lege ball very rapidly and may he 
right in there for the opening game 
ivhieh is still more than two weeks 
away. 

First string center at Friends Cen- 
tral, in Philadelphia, last year, Mack-| 
rell already looks like a logical suc-l 
cesser to Doe Slade and Al Dudderar. [ 
Among the Freshmen candidates, . 
Hitchcock also stands watching. Hej 
Played for St. Pauls, Baltimore, and 
though rather slow and a bit green 
should develop into a dependable 
tackle. . 



Cross-Country Track 

Coach Ekaitis announced definite- 
ly that there will be a cross-country 
track team at Washington College 
this fall. Serious practice will begin 
around November I in order to get 
into condition five men to represent 
the collepe in the only meet of the 
season, the SVz-mile Mason-Dixon 
Conference Championship Cross 
Country Meet. Roe and Sharrer are 
the only distance men left from last 
year, consequently there will be plen- 
ty of opportunities for frosh track- 



Dear Diary . 



Dear Diary . 



(Continued from page 1) 
try to visualize the room in Reid Hall 
where tea was poured at the Faculty 
Student Ten. I could remember all 
the people in the room, but when I 
began to try to place the objects in 
the room I slipped back to a phrase 
that Dr. Mead had said at the time he- 
met the Freshmen class. 

Don't talk too much was the gen- 
eral idea, and I began to worry about 
how much I had said and if it had 
been too much. 

My thoughts were then broken by 
the realization that there bad been 
a swelling wave of noise outside and 
that it was now a roar. 

At twelve, someone started playing 
taps on a trumpet, and they called us 
out into the third floor hall. A line 
was formed alphebetically, and we 
were blindfolded. As we stood there 
a chant was started, and I heard them 
chanting my name. 

It seemed that we were walk- 
ed and crawled, went up and down ! 
for an eternity. There was no time; 
element to it — things just happened 
and kept on happening. 

One of the times that I was on my 
knees I suddenly was doused with the 
slimiest, foulest, smelliest oil that 
anyone ever had the misfortune to 
have put on them. I don't know how 
much was put on me, but I do know 
that there were 35 gallons when they 
started. 

It only took about eight showers to 
get the oil washed off, but it took two 
lays and over a bottle of shampoo to 
get the coal dust out of my scalp. 

Brother Rat. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
to imitate the gushy gurgling of the! 
recepticle used for the disposal anil 
removal of excess waste material. 

The climax of my evening arrived: 
when I had to crawl through the, 
keyhole. On account of the differ- 
ence in size of the keyhole and me,, 
and since I've gotten out of practice' 
lately in the art of induction and ex-! 
trication the whole affair became very) 
difficult, especially when the giggles! 
set in, which they did in such a ter- 
rific manner that I nearly had a heart' 
attack which is bad 'cause I have a ' 
weak heart anyway — along certain ' 
lines. 

We received instructions as to what 
horrible garb we were to appear in 
next day and also that we have to 
bow to certain of the boys and I cer- t 
tainly am not going to lower myself 
to bow to them. Of course I'm real- 
ly looking forward to the next meet- 
ing in an apprehensive way. I'm 
really glad to be a nice fat Rat and 
to become enlightened on the subject 
of whether it is my false face or my 
real personality that rings the phone. 

Well, I'm off to bed to dream of all 
the weird, horrible, delightful things 
yet to come. 

Rat Boiling. 



Bill Chaires, who transfered from 
Washington College to the United 
States Naval Academy, was this week 
placed on the first string Plebe Soc- 



cer team. Chaires who figured high 
in hiffh school soccer, was one of 
those attempting to have the game 
installed in Washington College. 



Welcome Students To 
Washington College 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 

Radio Headquarters 



Kent County Savings Bank 

Commercial and Savings 
Accounts 

Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 
AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber, Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone 5 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



Heed The College Cry Tonight: 

Let's Go Up To 

BENNETT'S 

And 
Relax With The Crowd 



"We Don't Keep The Best- 
We Sell It I" 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. ■ TUES. - WED., SEP. 29-30-OCT. 1 

M-G-M presents in one great entertain- 
ment a remarkable galaxy of gay, brilliant 
stars. 

JOAN CRAWFORD - ROBERT TAYLOR 
GREER GARSON-HERBERT MARSHALL 

"WHEN LADIES MEET" 

A parade of stars in the gayest fun tale 
since "Philadelphia Story." 

THUR. - FRI. - SAT., OCTOBER 2-3-4 

BIG DOUBLE FEATURE ATTRACTION 

GENE AUTRY - SMILEY BURNETTE 
— in — 

"UNDER FIESTA STARS" 

—Plus Hit No. 2— 

"SING ANOTHER CHORUS" 

— with — 

JANE FRAZEE 

JOHNNY DOWN - MISCHA AUER 



CHESTERTOWN 

BANK 

OF 

MARYLAND 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builder. 

Pbone 305 - 288 — Campui Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Pydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
— For — 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



The Transcript 

Chestertown, Maryland 
Photographic and Engraving Department 



Neat Printing Our Specialty 



No Job Too Large 
No Job Too Small 



Dance Programs, Tickets, Placards, Etc. 



Complete Coverage Of News 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 26, 1941 



NORTHEAST CORNER 



Men in college whose draft num- 
bers come up dining the college term 
may now be deferred until the end of 
the term by action of their local 
hoards, according to a regulation cir- 
culated from Selective Service head- 
quarters in Washington last Monday. 
By this regulation, local boards are 
authorized to defer when immediate 
induction would cause "undue hard- 
ship" because of interference with 
college work. The important con- 
sideration seem to be that a man 
shall have been in college long enough 
(hat semester, before the call for in- 
duction comes, this his immediate in- 
duction will really be a hardship to 
him. Evidently the local boards will 
still be the judge as to what consti- 
tutes a sufficient time in classes to 
create that hardship, and once again 
college authorities will be called on to 
give evidence before the boards as to 
the man's entire academic situation. 

The original draft legislation of 
1940 provided automatic deferments 
for men in eollege, until July I, 1941. 
That provision expired at that time, 
and the only deferments usually giv- 
en have been for upperclassmen in 
pre-medical, pre-engineering, indus- 
trial chemistry and uther scientific 
courses definitely tied in with the de- 
mands of national defense. These 
deferred classifications have usually 
been made on the same basis as the 
occupational deferments of men 
working in essential industries. 

College men have not been seeking 
class privileges of group deferments 
simply because they were college men. 
The attitude of the educational lead- 
ers has been that until the acute 
emergency of actual war arises, when 
man-power is required without re- 
spect to educational standing, it is 
better for the country to disturb 
higher education as little as possible, 
since it is from the college graduates 
that social and professional' leader 
ship is expected to come. Neve 
have the educational leaders asked 
for exemption for their boys. De- 
ferments have been requested quite 
regularly, the country over, so as to 
permit men to complete at least the 
year in which they have started, and 
from the beginning, the Association 
of American Colleges, and other edu 
cational groups, have favored a Con 
gressional amendment to the law 
which would make the previous di 
ferments to July 1 the regular nil 
That amendment, sponsored now by 
Senator Langer of North Dakota, w 
introduced several months ago, but 
only recently has secured favorable 
notice from the Senate Committee on 
Military Affairs. In the meantime, 
the now regulation mentioned above 
has been promulgated by Selective 
Service Headquarters, taking care of 
the situation for the first semester of 
the year. 

It must be made clear that draft 
hoards have had this privilege all the 
time, by the operation of one regula- 
tion (if they cared to exercise it) per- 
mitting a deferment of induction af- 
ter a man has been classified on the 
basis of "undue personal hardship." 
This is a limited term deferment, re- 
newable if the Board sees fit. This 
is different from the occupational de- 
ferment of science majors. It is 
known as "Paragraph 418b", and is 
becoming quite famous among col- 
lege administrators. At a meeting 
of college presidents recently, it was 
remarked that "418b causes more 
trouble than all the rest of the law 
and regulations put together." 

Some of the men now in upper- 
class work here at Washington Col- 
lege are carrying on their work now 
because their boards exercised their 
rights under "418b", and others are 
still waiting to see whether the boards 
with which they are registered will 
grant them that same privilege. 

In strengthening the situation of 
men who desire to complete the se- 



mester or year in which they are 
studying before they enter service, 
the Selective Service Headquarters 
point out that a man who was subject 
to immediate induction before the 
term opened could not expect to be 
deferred merely by then entering col- 
lege. However, the decision still lies 
with the local boards as to what con- 
stitutes "personal hardship". 

No one has ever questioned the 
fundamental patriotism of the Amer- 
ican college man. The problem is 
entirely one of arranging his term of 
service and his college work so that 
he will ultimately be a better trained 
man whose service to his country will 
be improved thereby. This has been 
the attitude of the President's Office 
at Washington College, through which 1 
office all men registered either in i 
October or July have been kept aware t 
of their current situation. 

If the Lanser amendment gains the! 
support of Congress, no inductions of! 
college men will be made except dui'-j 
ing the summer, after July 1. Until 
then, the regulation provides for de- 
ferments until the end of the semes- ■ 
ter, renewable for a longer time ifi 
the board sees fit, if a man is classl 
tied 1A and called for induction af- 
ter the term has well started. 

Gilbert W. Mead 



Draftee's Letter . 



Hot House . . . 



With The 



Greeks 



Rufus Johnson represented Beta 
Omega Chapter at the Kappa Alpha 
National Convention held this sum- 
mer at Cavalier Hotel, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. More than 250 
members represented KA Chapters 
from all over the United States. 

Highlights-of the Convention were 
a dance at the Beach Club, a beacii 
party and luncheon, a model initia- 
tion in the ballroom of the Cavalier 
Hotel, and a seven-course banquet in 
the ball-room. Convention officials. 
received wires from General Mushall, 
Chief-of-Staff of the United States 
Army and J. Edgar Hoover, chief of 
the F. B. I., regretting the fact that 
national business made it impossible 
for them to attend. Both are KA's, 



(Continued from Page 2) 
and a few negligible items. The 
heavy pack has a blanket or two in it. 
Carrying my pack I weigh 287 
pounds. I weighed only 135 pounds 
when I came to camp, so yon can see 
how agreeable it is to romp and play 
in the mountains. 

An observation car follows us as 
we climb the mountain and picks up 
the fellows who faint. The boys who 
fall out into the mountain climbing 
are treated very well. They give 
them six months in the guard house, 
but they do not have to face court 
martial. The stretch is much more 
pleasant that way. At twelve o'clock 
some of us who can, limp to the in- 
firmary. At the infirmary patients 
are divided into two classes: 1. Those 
who have athlete's foot and 2. Those 
who have colds. If you have Ath- 
lete's foot you get your feet swabbed 
with -iodine. If you have a cold, you 
get your throat swabbed with iodine. 
Anyone who claims he has neither a 
cold nor athlete's foot is sent to the 
guard-house for impersonating an of- 
ficer. I am very popular at the in- 
firmary, Honey, I told them that I had 
both a cold and athlete's foot. What 
I really have is gastric ulcers and a 
boil on my "back", but I know when 
to keep my mouth shut, 

Well, honey, that's all I have time 
for tonite, I can hear someone sneak- 
ing up on the light switch and it's al- 
most eight P. M. The light's should 
have been out fifteen minutes ago. 
Love and X'ses, 

Apostle. 

P. S. Got a letter from Jim 
Steele, at the Navy Yard.. "Say's 
there's so much to do flying one of 
those thing's, you can't even wave to 
any quail." 

Goodbye for now, 

Apostle. 



The Lambda Chi Alpha National 
Convention was held in Excelsior \ 
Springs, Mo., the last week of August, j 
Epsilon-Thcta Chapter at Washington 
College was represented by Basil C. 
Clark as delegate and Robert N. Cor- 
ley. 

Representatives, numbering nearly 
400 from the 107 chapters, located 
throughout the United States and 
Canada were in attendance. After 
business meetings and sport events 
the convent was climaxed by a ban- 
quet and dance. 



Downbeat . . . 

(Continued from Page 2) 
gives Roy a solo whenever possible 
and Ehlridge gives the audiences new 
appreciation for music. The sepia 
star performs wonders with "After 
You've Gone", "Green Eyes", and 
"Rocking Chair". Stay with him. 

Benny Goodman with his new band 
has left an unforgettable summer be- 
hind. His "Soft as Spring" and 
"Lazy River" will cause many a mem- 
ory. The swing arrangements of 
"Tuesday at Ten" and "Air Mail 
Special" will stay with the classics, 
while "Something New" truly intro- 
duces something new in swing music. 

It is pleasing to note recentness of 
the recordings of the various juke 
boxes around Chestertown. We hope 
they keep remembering the college 
students and their tastes. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
additional assistance of Dr. Robinson 
and Prof. Snyder, the mason work 
was completed. According to Dr. 
Robinson this work provided quite aj 
bit of amusement since all were ama- 
teurs. Finishing touches included I 
the whitewashing and installation of; 
plain window panes. 

At present there are about 150 
species of plants in the hothouse, all 
of which were brought over from 
Hopkins by Dr. Kline, successor to 
Dr. Chatters. Among these plants 
(all of which are aquatic tropicals) 
are cacti, euphorbias, palms, ferns, 
and several orchids. This green- 
house will be of value to botany stu- 
dents in identification and horticul- 
tural training, since it will be main- 
tained mostly by these students. Dr. 
Kline has expressed the wish that 
more students use the hothouse since 
"things are of value only when they 
are used." 



Draft Situation 

(Continued from Page 2) 
many high school graduates have dt. 
cided not to continue their scholastic 
work because of the uncertainty J 
being able to finish. It makes no tijf. 
ference whether a student plmv 
an engineer, a doctor, a lawyei 
just attending college to pln> 
ball. He is not exempt froi 
Selective Service. It is true 
Local Draft Boards often defe 
ical students, but each case is left j, 



-cw- 



Timely Topics . . . 

(Continued from Page 2) 
tough Sophomore girls, led by some 
of the more venturesome of thei 
class, lined up the entire Freshman 
Class and had them led through finger 
drills and such. All went well until 
the Freshman boys were ordered to 
dance with them — a dance that was 
frequently interrupted with air raids. 
. . . It may be only a rumor but wc 
have heard that the Flying Pentagon 
will no longer be confined to its 
"Bandbox" Gym this year. It is re 
ported that Coach Dumschott has ob 
tained permission to use the local 
armory to stage the coming court 
contests. It is also reported that 
basketball practice is scheduled 
start within the next three weeks. 



Another week draws to an end, 
Perhaps many of us will find relief 
at the Navy-William and Mary garni 
at Annapolis tomorrow afternoon. 
So long, and thirty. 



ELM NOTICE 
There will be a short but im- 
portant meeting of the Junior 
and Sophomore Boards of the 
ELM Staff in the ELM office 
Monday at 12:45. 



foo| 
U 
thi 



the discretion of the Board, y, 
engineers are needed in the Nati 
Defense Program and in the A 
and doctors are in demand foi 
various army camps. In time of 
both would be sorely needed. 

Because the college student ' 
es to complete his education, becauj 
'ie wishes deferment until he grndi 
ates, does not mean that he eons! 1 
ers himself a privilodged person, \ 
docs not mean that he is is attempt 
ing "to beat the draft" when 
one else is called to the colors, 
is only asking for a chance to 
prove himself by the advantagt 
a college education. It seems, to th 
undergraduate, that he could belli 
serve his country in this period i 
emergency, during a possible wo 
and in time of peace if allowed ' 
complete his college training. 






Scholarships . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
of the ELM, was President and Bus 
iness Manager of the Debate Club, j 
member of the Student Council in hi 
Sophomore year, and was a membei 
of the Mount Vernon Literary Socie 
ty and the Science Club. 



Miss Marie Whitney, '40, is a mem 
ber of the teaching staff of the Che? 
tertown High School. During thi 
past year she pursued graduate wc 
at the University of Pennsylvania. 



Dr. W. H. Mayer 

CHIROPRACTOR 
X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A complete line supplies plus all texts 
For all classes 

OPEN — 9 - 12; 2:15 - 5:15 



Alpha Omicron Pi Convention 

The convention of Alpha Omicron 
Pi was held in New Orleans in July. 
Over two hundred delegates from all 
over the United States and Canada 
gathered at the Hotel Roosevelt. The 
theme of the convention was tradi- 
tion, all the tradition of the old 
south. The highlight of the week 
was the Convention Ball after which 
the girls had a taste of New Orleans 
night life. The post convention 
houseparty was held at Biloxi on the 
Gulf of Mexico. 

Orchestra . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 
Hitchcock; celloist, Powers; saxo- 
phonists, Sylvester, J. Hitchcock, 
Parris, Reed, Rothermel, Hazelett, 
and Wilkinson; trumpeter, Johnny 
Russell ; trombonists, McClelland, 
Ruark and Lynch ; clarinetists, 
Crouch, Valentine, and Thomas; 
bassoonist, Livingstone; and tubaist, 
Towner. 



-Pleasing Printing For Particular People- 

The Enterprise 

Phone 19 
Chestertown, Maryland 

-We Print The Washington Elm— 



NEW3 iiv 
BRIEF. ._„ 

YMCA Sponsors Dancing Classes 

A dancing class, held twice every 
ivcek, beginning next Tuesday, will 
be sponsored by the YMCA, it a 
Hecitlcd ' ll their first regular meeting 
Jield last Tuesday. The committee in 
charge is headed by Edgar Wood, 
chairman, Emicli, Warfield, Hors- 
fc e |d, and Voith. 



Alurr 



Killed On Ma 



meral Services for Charles A 
Holland, '32, were held at his homt 
nt Marion Station on September 19. 
Holland, a recent selectee, was killed 
n action during army maneuvers near 
Bowling Green, Virginia, on Septem- 

17. 




ILfi 111 



"V" 



Vol. XLI 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD., FRIDAY, OCT. 3, 1941 



Price Ten Cents 



Sen. W.F.Davis 
To Be 'Speaker 
In Next Chapel 



Final Registration Places WJ. Burke Cites 

Total Enrollment At 322 Personal Trials 

As News Editor 



issue 
Clas 



Players Will Issue Call To Fr. 

The Washington Players will 
|u> firsl call to the Freshm; 
jext week to fill many gaps left by 
raduation in the several depart- 
lents of the club. 
The first play has not been select- 
id yet but the committee in charge 
wnounced this week that it would be 
^finitely of a serious nature. The 
'layers will attempt to have a new 
ighting system installed on the stage 
Bill Smith and funds will be raised 
attempt to convert the wasted 
ice beneath the stage into dressing 
ml paint-rooms. 



Prominent Speakers, Musical 

Programs, Announced By 

Mr. Goodwin 



Analysis Shows Increase Over Last Year's Enrollment Despite 
Present National Emergency 



380 Books Added To Library 

Mr, Henry Coleman, librarian, an- 
'iniced this week that 380 new books 
11 be placed in the library and cat 
loged within the next several 
reeks. Many of the books are gift: 
f various friends of the college in 
luding Miss Doris Bell, girls' physi 
il education instructor, and Mr. Rob- 
t Lester, speaker at the dedication 
f the Bunting Library. 



Viiitors-Governors Meet Tomorrow 

The Board of Visitors and Gover- 
ns of Washington College will meet 
ommrow, October 4. The Budget 
littee will present the college 
udget for 1941-42 to the Board for 
pproval. Committees for the eom- 
n? year will also be appointed at this 



Info 



nal Dances Unlimited 



Dean Frederick G. Livingood, 
^airman of the Faculty Committee 
n Activities, announced this week 
iat the students would be allowed 
s many informals this year as would 
elf-supporting. Organizations 
ig to hold a formal or informal 
this year should hand their po- 
tion to Dr. Livingood before noon, 
Wednesday. These organizations 
iust not expect financial support for 
dances from ODK. 



IcNiff Elected To Head Varsity Club 

ncis McNiff was elected Wed- 
y night by the Varsity Club to 

"ccecd Charlie Fetter as president of 
Washington College Varsity 

lub. Other officers elected were Al- 
Judderar, vice-president; Marlin 
i, secretary, and Big Jim Stev- 
i chancellor of the exchequer. 





ELM Notice 




The 


re will be a short 


meet- 


«ng of 


all Freshmen desir 


ng to 


comt 


out for the busines 


staff 


of the 


ELM in the ELM 


office 


on Mt 


nday at 12:45. 




■ 







Senator Wilmer Fell Davis, minor- 
ity leader of the Maryland State Sen- 
ate, will be the assembly speaker 
Thursday, according to an announce- 
ment by Mr. Goodwin. 

Other prominent speakers whose 
appearance on the assembly program 
has been arranged by Mr. Goodwin 
include Rabbi Lazeron, of Baltimore, 
Dr. Emanuel Sternheim, of Louisiana; 
a professional lecturer on European 
affairs, and Mrs. Murrell, of Florida, 
who will speak on "Women, Love 
and Law." 

Senator Davis is a prominent Re- 
publican of the Eastern Shore. A 
esident of Federalsburg, he has 
presented Caroline county in the state 
legislature for many years. A pop 
ipeaker on previous assembly 
programs, many students will remem- 
ber his talk, "Assuming Responsibil 
ities", given here in the spring of 
1940. 

The assembly program for the year, 
as outlined by Mr. Goodwin, falls in- 
to three major divisions. Beside 
prominent speakers, there will be a 
number of musical programs, and, 
finally, hours sponsored by student 
organizations. Groups from Pea- 
body and Curtis Institute have al- 
ready been secured to appear here 
this year. 



CCA student pilot registration at 
University of Minnesota this fall is 
40, ten more than last year. 



Final registration figures for thi: 
semester, as released by Dr. Howell': 
office yesterday, show a total enroll 
ment of 322 as compared with 318 at 
this time last year. 105 of these are 
girls. 

An analysis of registration figures 
establishes the fact that the College 
has been able to maintain both the 
number of student and the regular 
class distribution of students despite 
the many disturbances of national 
emergency. Although it was expect- 
ed that an increased proportion of co- 



eds would have to be admitted, the 
normal 2 to 1 ratio has been success- 
fully maintained. 

Comparative figures for this fall 
and the total 1940-41 registration 
follow: 

1941 1940-41 



Seniors 62 54 

Juniors 65 68 

Sophomores 81 90 

Freshmen ill 108 

Unclassified 3 g 

Total 322 328 



Want A Date Changed, 
Or An Appropriation? 



hasn't had one i 
please petitio 



Any organization desiring an 
appropriation from ODK, which 
the past, will 
ODK for such 
an appropriation stating the 
amount desired and the reasons 
it is necessary. All petitions 
should be handed to Rufus 
Johnson or Albert Mooney be- 
fore Tuesday at 12 noon. 

Need Your Date Changed? 

If any organization wishes to 
change the date of their meet- 
ing night, please inform an 
ODK member immediately. 



President Roosevelt's youngest son 
John, was among 376 naval reserv< 
ensigns recently graduated from f 
three months training course conduct- 
ed by the navy's supply corps at the 
Harvard business school. 



Women Start 

Rush Period 

Activities Begin With Pan-Hell 
Tea Sunday 



Student Council Sworn In; Jane 

Lyons Leads Songs In 

Second Assembly 



Freshmen girls desirous of joining 
sororities will express their wishes at 
the Panhellenic Tea in Hodson Hall 
from three to five Sunday afternoon, 
which will be the beginning of for- 
mal rushing. 

At this function, the freshmen will 
be given cards to fill out signifying 
their desire to join one of the Greek 
letter sororities on the campus. 

This tea marks the former begin- 
ning of the two weeks rushing per- 
iod, at the end of which time bids 
ill be given out. 

Committees for the tea are com- 
prised of girls from each of the three 
sororities and are headed by members 
j of the Panhellenic Council. 



Tradition Begun In 1909 Is 

Discovered By Chief Newton 

Rusty Cylinder Contains Personal Papers Of College Student 
Written In 1909 



A 31-ycar-old tradition was e 
tinued this week when a cylinder con- 
taining mysterious papers was uncov- 
ered from its secret cache somewhere 
on the Washington College campus 

This tradition, which was consider- 
ed by many to be just a myth, was 
discovered as an actuality this week 
when Chief Newton accidentally hap- 
pened upon the hiding place of the 
container. The story goes that many 
years ago someone wrote out his per- 
sonal secrets of college life, put them 
in a cylinder, and hid them some- 
where on the campus. The key to 
the hiding place was put between the 
pages of some seldom used book in 
the library. The person who hap- 
pened to find these directions was to 
get the can, read, if he desired, what 
i written therein, add something 
of his own, and hide the cylinder 
again. 

Finder Honor Bound 

Directions in the can honor bound 
the finder not to divulge any of the 
secrets. The tradition is being main- 
tained this week. 

Rufus Johnson, to whom the can 
has been turned over, has read the 
papers and plans to enter something 
of his own and then rehide it, leav- 
ing the directions somewhere in the 
library. Although ELM reporters 



tradi 



were not permitted to inspect the se-jcut 



cret papers according to the 
tion, this much was learned. 

In this cylinder, which is eight in- 
ches deep and about three inches 
diameter, there were two papers, yel- 
lowed with age, and the penciled 
script upon them was hardly legible, 
The earliest date on the papers was 
1909 and it was signed with the ini- 
tials of either "J. B." or "T. B." Ac 
cording to Rufus Johnson, the papers 
were of a personal nature and both 
papers were written by the same per- 
son. 

Records in the Registrar's office 
show that there were four people re- 
gistered during the year of 1909 
whose initials were J. B. There was 
no one registered whose initials 
would be T. B. Those who could have 
answered to these initials were Jos- 
eph Leo Brown, Havre de Grace, Jos- 
eph Roy Baden, Baden, John Lewin 
Burris, Chestertown, and James Lam- 
bert Bacchuss, of Chestertown. One 
of these persons was probably the 
originator of the tradition. 

Penciled marks on the outside of 
the cylinder which were interpreted 
as "J. F. A. — 1930." The only one 
registered in the college during the 
year of 1930 who could answer to 
these initials were Joseph Francis 
Alexander, of Waterbury, Connect!- 



Historians Will 
Aid Countians 



Assistance in plans for the tercen- 
tennial celebration of the Kent Coun 
Historical Society will be one of the 
College Historical Society's main ac- 
tivities this year, it was decided by 
the group at its first meeting on Tues- 
day. 

Dr. Dole addressed the group with 
an account of the forthcoming year's 
activities of the Kent County Histor- 
ical Society. 

All the members agreed to cooper- 
ate with the County Society in pre- 
paring for its tercentennial celebra- 
tion to be held in Chestertown on 
July 20, in which all the Eastern 
Shore counties will take part. A 
committee was appointed to investi- 
gate major duties in preparation for 
the event and to discuss the feasibil- 
ity of entering a float in the'parade. 
oo 



"Beat Hopkins" 




Maroon "W's" impr 


nted with 


"Beat Hopkins" will L 


e on sale 


by the Washington Co 


lege Var- 


sity Club beginning 


Monday, 


October 6. Every . 


tudent is ' 


urged to buy one to 


promote , 


the much-needed school spirit 


and also to aid the 


Varsity 


Club. Don't forget to do your 


part to "Beat Hopkins 


' by buy- 


ing a Varsity Club Vi 


tory Tag 


for a nickel. 





"If you have an earnest desire to 
be a newspaperman, I can't say any- 
thing that will stop you," said William 
J. (Reds) Burke, alumnus of the chi s 
of 1930 and sports editor of the Ches- 
ter TIMES, in his assembly address 
yesterday. 

Speaking on "Newspaper Work as 
seen by a Sports Editor," Reds Burke 
entertained faculty and students 
alike with first-hand illustrations in a 
pseudo-depreciatory account of his 
profession. 

The second assembly program of 
the year saw Jane Lyons as song 
leader, filling the gap left by Ogle 
I Hess's graduation. President Mead 
swore in Ray Kirby as head of the 
student council preceding Burke's 
talk, and Kirby in turn swore in Bas- 
il Clark, Robert Crane, Harry Lore, 
Elroy Boyer, Omar Jackson, Albert 
Mooney, Harry Roe, and Robert Ruff 
as members of the 1941-42, 

Planned To Be Teacher 
Reds Burke planned originally to 
be a teacher and not a sportswriter at 
all. "Dr. Howell," he explained, "is 
directly, totally responsible for my 
being a newspaper man," and told of 
his first teaching experience with a 
class of twenty-six girls and one boy 
in the high school. After the class 
Dr. Howell called him in and said to 
him, "Reds, why don't you give it 
:p?" "And so", said Reds Burke, 
I did." 
In his talk he traced news from its 
occurrence to coverage by a "leg" 
man, telephoning to a rewrite man, 
thence through the city editor to the 
presses, and back to the city editor 
for a thorough examination, 

Burke did not encourage journalis- 
tic neophytes. He mentioned leaving 
a $40 a week job to take a ?20 a 
week reporter's post and told of the 
difficulties within the profession, 
which he called the "poorest paid" of 
all. The climb up the ladder is slow. 
It takes years to get a byline, let 
alone a front page column. The first 
job is usually "leg" work; the first 
promotion is to rewrite man. From 
here, he stated, progress is slow and 
competition stiff. 

Stone Wall Faces Newsmen 
"When you try to get ahead in 
newspaper work, you bang into a 
stone wall, and you have to branch 
out sidewards." Burke told of his 
own successful blanching out in sport- 
ing fields, including work for Penn- 
sylvania Military Academy, and — the 
money he lost betting on the College 
against P. M. C. in last year's foot- 
ball game! 

His conclusion was that he would 
rather be a sports writer than any- 
thing else, despite the poor pay, and 
that he admired the clean play of 
human emotions which is the back- 
bone of good sport. He would solve 
the world's problems by getting one 
hundred Larry MacPhails, of Brook- 
lyn Dodger fame, to ballyhoo and pro- 
ote sports internationally. 



Justice Frederic R. Colie of New 
Jersey state supreme court has re- 
ceived from Dartmouth College the 
B. S. degree which he failed to get 24 
years ago when he left college to join 
the army ambulance corps. 



PAGE TWO 

THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWX. MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, bv and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland. 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 

Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor • • Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Junior Board 
James Aycock Don McClellan Phyllis Peters 

Molly Blackwood Leonard Parvis William Roe 

Dian Hubbard Ellen Peters Naomi Russell 

Sophomore Board 
Patsy Frory Dorothy Reidy Gretchen Smith 

Robert Hill Norman Sharrer John R. Smith 

Frank Macielag Gaylord Steele 

Business Staff 
Robert Livingston Clarence Valentine James Juliana 
Hairy Slade Edwin Boyer Joseph McLaughlin 

Business Manager , A , RufUS C ' J ° hnS ° n 
Dr. H. O. Wern er, Faculty Adviser 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1941 

Desk Editor For this Issue Pains 

, . , , Hubbard, Sharrer 

Assistants 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCT. 3, 1941 



m& <?«««, 




UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI 
IMN STUDENT. CONSIDERS 
THE LOSS OF A LEG NO 
HANDICAP. HE HAS EEF.N 
CHEER LEADER FOR FIVE 
YEARS, WON SEVERAL 
JITTER-BUG CONTESTS, 
DRIVES A CAR AND CAN 
ROLLER SKATE/ 



KARL 'NO-PUNCH' WALDRON 

WON THE INTERFRATERNITV BANTWA- 
WEISHT BOXING CROWN AT THE 
UN1V OF MINNESOTA WITHOUT A 
SINGLE FIGHT.' HE WftS THE ONLY 
ONE ENTERED IN THIS DIVISION . 



• USELESS INFORMATION ■ 

JTUDENTJo"PEND 21.000 HOURS A 
YEAR .STANDING IN REGISTRATIOM 
. . . LINEJ ■ ■ ■ 



Ultimatum — Arms Or Education 

Colleges and universities, this year, are opening their doors 
upon the most hazardous and uncertain year of their existence. 
Manv students are not aware of the fact that the nation s un- 
precedented defense effort, which is responsible for good 
times" throughout the country, may have just the opposite ef- 
fect upon one of our oldest institutions— education. 

Conscription has reduced the enrollment ot many colleges 
by 30 per cent although Washington College has not suffered 
greatly from this cause. Added to this, however, is a factor 
that has effected our college. The rising costs of living coupled 
with the demand for workers in the rushing tide of defense in. 
dustries has greatly decreased the number of students. 

Thus taking all these factors together— lowered income of 
invested funds, higher operating costs due to increased war 
prices, decimated student bodies and consequently greatly re- 
duced income from tuition fees — hundreds of colleges are fac- 
ing either sharp entrenchment or annihilation. It would cer- 
tainly be ironic if the administration of the social problem which 
underlies the defense effort should make its earliest casualty 
one of the nation's most valuable institutions. 

In 1918, the effect of conscription upon colleges was eased 
by a device known as the student army training corps. It was 
merely a more intense form of the present day ROTC which is 
practiced successfully in so many schools. At that time, how- 
ever, though it saved the schools, from educational and nulitar- 
' istic points of view, it was unsatisfactory. But, however unsat- 
isfactory it was, it did save the schools. 

The entire aspect of the situation in which college men 
find themselves today would be changed, were it that they are 
seeking to dodge the draft. No informed person could accuse 
them of that. The majority of the college men being inducted 
are those who have completed two and three years of college 
and have but one more year to complete in order to obtain that 
coveted sheepskin. Also, the majority of the men who have 
been forced into the service may never be able to resume their 
studies at the end of the crisis, thus lowering in wholesale quan- 
tities the education standing of the population, besides destroy- 
ing the high ambitions of today's youth. 

There are three possible courses for the nation to take. 
Either national laws protecting the college man must be made, 
or military training must be coupled with education, or the idea 
of higher education for men must be dropped completely until 
the end of the crisis. Certainly it would be better, if necessary, 
to couple education with military training, no matter how in- 
convenient, than to destroy higher education altogether. The 
easiest solution would be the formation of protective laws to be 
in effect until that day when open hostilities begin. Then, no 
one will be more willing to shoulder the gun than the college 
man. 



TIMELY 
TOPICS 



NORTHEAST 
CORNER 



THE DRAFT 

FURTHER EXPLANATION 

FOOTBALL SCENES 

Comes another Wednesday night 
and another deadline approaches rap- 
'. The big news of the campus at 
this time seems to center about the 
question of whether four previously 
deferred draftees will have to go or 
will they be allowed to enjoy the lux- 
uries of college until June. These 
l, Kiiby, Stevens, Reidy, and 
Storm, are a big part of the Maroon 
and Black line this year. If these 
four boys should have to leave the old 
Alma Mammy, it'll bring home to 
many the need of some law for the 
protection of college seniors. The 
Local Board seems to recognize what 
the State Board can't see. 

With another week comes anoth 
apology. Perhaps some week we'll 
be able to hold up our heads and p: 



claim to the world — "This week, we 
didn't tell a He." Last week, we car- 
ried an editorial acclaiming certain 
possible injustices of the new absence 
system only to find cut a day after 
publication that a remedy had been 
found even before it was needed. Our 
apologies to the Administration for 
lot mentioning the fact that a cora- 
nittee composed of faculty members 
,nd administrative officers had been 
et up to jud£;e on special cases. We 
hange our tune. We can definitely 
be quoted as saying "The new ab 
e system should be a very defin 
ite success and improvement." 

Throughout the state last week, and 
the country, the national football 
games stole the news. Maryland won 
a game — finally. Navy took William 
and Mary (which game we hod the 
privilege of seeing), while Western 
Maryland beat Cortland and Mt. St. 
Mary's took a spill. Our own eleven 
had its first scrimmage and will con- 
tinue to have them every day until 
the first game. They really look good 
and should go places this year. New 
plays devised by Coach George will 
make the ball harder to follow this 
year. 

So long, and thirty. 



Professor Solandt Gives A 
"Salut Aux Etudients" To You 



The Sko'men Need You 

All famous collegiate teams, Washington College's Flying 
Pentagons, Notre Dame's undefeated elevens, all have been in- 
spired to their greatest victories by the lusty cheers of entire 
student bodies. A team, no matter how good it may be, cannot 
win victory after victory unless it has that "do or die" spirit 
which comes only as a result of intensified school spirit. 

On October eleventh, next Saturday, the Sho'men take the 
field against our traditional state rival, Johns Hopkins. Many 
of last year's stalwarts will be back in action, plus some likely 
looking Freshmen, and we expect them to give the Baltimore 
boys a sound trouncing. Let's do our part by turning out en 
masse for a big and loud pep meeting next Friday night. Re 
member that you are as much a factor in a win or loss as each 
of the members of the eleven. J. L. P. 



(This is the second of a series of 
articles in foreign languages to ap- 
pear in the ELM. Next week, an 
article by Dr. Lawrence Ford.) 
Salut aux Etudiants de Premiere 
Aiinee! 

Ceux qui s'interessent a la langue 
et a la litterature franeaises sont bicn 
contents de faire un accueil cordial 
aux eleves recemment arrives a 
Washington College. 

Vous voyez que les dortoirs et les 
salles de classe, en repos depuis 
plusieurs mois, se reveillent aux salu- 
tations joyeuses des eamarades qui 
se retrouvent apres les vacanees pas- 
sees a la maison, a l'ouvrage ou en 
voyage. C'est la rentree des classes. 
Nous sommes certains que vous aussi 
trouverez des amis ldyaux et agre- 
ables. 

Ici l'air frais et le ciel clair nou: 
font penser plutot aux "Feiix de la 
Saint-Jean" qu'aux recoltes d'autom 
ne, et cependant il ne fait plus aussi 
chaud qu'en ete et les feuilles des 
arbres commencent a tomber une 
une sur le sol. Les jours diminuent 
deja de plus en plus et bientot le 
ciel deviendra riielancolique et 
nuits plus froides. 



Maintenant les devoirs de classe et 
de laboratoire remplissent les heures 
lu matin et celles peu avancees de 
Ppapres midi. En temps et lieu 
peut entendre les cris des jeunes gens 
qui jouent au football ou de vos am: 
aux courts. Dans la soiree on fait 
"ses devoirs, etudie a la bibliotheque 
assiste quelquefois au cinema ou au 
bal. Ainsi done la vie quotidienne a 
Washington se trouve promptement 
en pleine activite. 

Au milieu de la douloureuse 
epreuve que traverse la Prance, les 
classes de francais en Amerique doi- 
vent maintenir les liens de sympathie 
litteraire et morale qui unissent la 
Fiance aux autres peuples depuis bien 
des siecles. Nous esperons que vous 
serez des notres a 1'etude de la clarte 
et de la precision d'une litterature 
fameuse ou on trouve Carmen, Cyra- 
no, Figaro et Gargantua. 

Nous nous promettons de faire 
votre connaissance a ces jours du 
debut et nous souhaitons que les 
eleves avances fassent partie du 
Cercle Francais. Encore salut 
bonne chance! 



College Life Picked Up Quickly 
As the semester settles into it 
tride, all of us (except the Fresh-; 
men) feel a bit of surprise at the 
ease with which we take up things 
just where we left last June, li is 
as though we had not been away— at 
least no longer than a week-entl, 
Classes, friendships, society meetings 
and programs, dates, movies, bull- 
sessions, athletic games — all the mn- 
chinery of college life — have been 
picked up just where they were laid 
down. 

The friends who graduated 
missed. But even there we have to 
adjust to their absence. More then 
once some of us have thought, "1 
must see Bill about that," and then 
have suddenly recalled that Bill walk. 
ed. out last Spring with a sheepskin, 
and is now battling a bigger world 
ihan the one of campus problems. So, 
without Bill, we have to settle the 
matter alone, or with our own exact 
contemperaries. 

The next shock is when the older 
upperclassmen come to a fuller reali- 
zation of their academic age by luiv- 
ing underclassmen, especially Fresh- 
men, coming to them for advice and 
leadership. The sobering thought 
that Bill is no longer here to lean on 
is added to by the realization that wc 
are now Bill to the younger men. 

Well, so it goes, and so it ever has 
gone since colleges were invented. It's 
the way leadership develops, and the 
campus is not the only part of the 
world where it happens that way. 

Freshmen Have Acute Adjustment 

The Freshmen are the only ones 
who have an acute adjustment 
make, to overcome the shock of end- 
ing one chapter and beginning anoth- 
er in unfamiliar surroundings. On the 
.-miallcr campuses, like ours here, the 
process of adjustment should not take 
long. If you are at all the adjustable 
sort, it is easier to get right side up 
among 350 new acquaintances than 
among 3500. And if you are not 

sily adjustable, that fact can be 
seen more easily, and can be n: 
quickly met in the smaller group. 

Of course, Jhe utterly unsocial be- 

g can be just as lonoly in a crowd 
as he would be in the depths of a fol 
if he closes his life to acquaint- 
ance and friendship. His chances ol 
achieving a position of leadership are 
exactly zero; and the possibility ol 
making any real academic progress j 
cut down very materially. 

Success Will Develop 

The fibre of success, the bone an> 
sinews of leadership, just like the hu 
man body, will astrophy without i 
tivity, and will develop only with nor 
mal exercise. Age is not necessarilj 
a mark of maturity. Time brings agf 
whether or no, but maturity cannot 
be achieved by simply sitting still. 

After all, then, this is not just i 
continuation of last year, in spite of 
the illusion of repetition. By rights' 
is not repetition for any individual 
It is, or ought to be, continuity, no 
repetition, with a growing power i 
mastery, and a higher standard ' 
achievement. Anything else is stag 
nation. It is as true in business 
the professions as it is in college, an 
learning it now will make it easier t 
appreciate when 'we have gone aloni 
the next step, and somebody else l 
filling our shoes here. 

—Gilbert W. Mead 



Offering a master's degree in aero 
nautical engineering for the firf 
time, University of Texas has adde 
courses in aerodynamics, airplac 
structural analysis and experiment* 
aerodynamics. 



FRIDAY, OCT. 3, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



HADAWAY GROCERY 
Meats and Vegetables 

Phone 37 
Cross Street, Chestertown 



Biology Department Adds 

Eleven New Plaster Models 



B*%*%M«%V«*X%WSVNNX\\V 



Usilton's 
f Funeral Home, Inc. 



', Phone 72 High St. 3j 

Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 

Radio Headquarters 




Mounted Macroscopic Views Give "Inside Story" Frogs, Cats, 
And Your Intestine 




IT'S 

GILL'S 

TONITE 

AND 

EVERYNITE 



Takinp; advantage of a clearance 
sale. Dr. Corrington has just been 
able to arid eleven brilliantly colored 
plaster biological models to his de- 
partmcnl's equipment. 

Primarily, one will be used in com- 
parative anatomy, three in histology, 
five in botany, and two in freshman 
biology. They will be used in inte: 
related courses, also. 

One of these models shows the 
gross anatomy of a cat; another is i 
cross-section of the human intestine 
Others reveal a dissected human kid 
ney, and a portion of human skin un- 
der great magnification. The five 
botanical models show cross-sectior 
and longitudinal views of monoeo 
tyledonous and diocotyledonou; 
stems, a root tip, a leaf, and a flower- 
ing plant. Models of the prothal- 
lium of the fern and embryology of 
the frog complete the group. 

Cat Is Dissectible 

The dissectible cat model is simi- 
lar to the corresponding human man- 
ikans used in medical schools. Eight 
pieces, including Tabby's tail, come 
apart, revealing clearly the muscular, 
vascular and skeletal systems and the 
complicated structure of the cat's 
head. 

The multi-colored heart, large liv- 
er lobes, much convoluted intestine, 
as well as the muscular and skeletal 
framework of the appendages, are 
painted in vivid colors. Tabby's in- 
terior is thoroughly exposed when he 
is completely exposed. Every im- 
portant anatomical part of the cat is 
numbered. A key chart accompanies 
the model so the enigma can be solv- 
ed. 

The principle of the eight botani- 
cal and histological models is to show 
a macrosocopic view of microscopic 
structures. A cross-section view of 
the wall of the human intestine 
shows the structure of two villi. These 
are microscopic finger-like projec- 
tions through which products of di- 
gestion in soluable form pass to the 
blood stream. This model also in- 
cludes lacteals, arteries, veins, lymph 
glands, and lymph vessels. A model 



IS YOUR WATCH ON THE BLINK? 
DO YOU OWE SOMEONE A GIFT ? 

Forney's Jewelry Store 

Chestertown, Maryland 



FOR THE ^CSt lN 

Laundry Cleaning 

Pressing 



see 



JIM JULIANA 

Representing 

Park Cleaners 



of a dissected human kidney shows 
the complicated system of collecting 
tubules and Malpighian bodies, in ad- 
dition to the blood system and ureters. 
A third histological model reveals a 
portion of the skin under great mag- 
nification. On the surface, several 
hairs are represented by two or 
three-inch structures; in the. interior 
the structural differences between 
sweat glands and oil glands are 
brought out in detail, as are the 
blood vessels, and cells and muscles 
of hairs. 
Botanical Models Are On Pedestals 

The five large botanical models, all! 
of which are mounted on pedestals] 
show both cross-section and longi- 
tudinal views. They include models 
of monocotyledonous and dicotyle- 
donous stems, a root tip, a leaf and a 1 
dissectible bowering plant. The 
contrasting features in structure be- 
tween the monocots and dicots are] 
well brought out, Dr. Corrington ex- 
plained. In the leaf model, in which 
all views are shown, the veins, fibro- 
ascular bundles, stomata, and layers 
of cells are represented plainly. 

The remaining purchases, to be us-' 
ed in freshman biology, include the 
prothallium of the fern and a set of 
twenty-five individual models show- 
ng consecutive stages in the embryol- 
ogy of the frog. 







A. S. TURNER & SONS 










The Firestone Store 










— SPORTING GOODS 






Tennis 


Racquets, Tennis Balls, Footballs, 


Baske 


tballs, 




Flashl 


ght Batteries, Electric Light Bulbs 






FILL UP 


WITH GOOD GULF GASOLINE 
High Street 


HERE 





With The 



Greeks 



Alpha Chi Omega 

The Alpha Chi Omegas will initi- 
ate Norma Murray of Princess Anne 
tonight. Norma is a senior and a 
transfer from the University of Mary- 
land. 

Alumni returning to the campus 
over the week-end were Frances Per- 
ry and Elizabeth Elliott, Class of "39, 
and Margaret Kintner, Priscilla 
Brown, and Agnes Zaffere of the 
Class of '41. 
Kappa Alpha 

Last Sunday, the Beta Omega 
Chapter of the Kappa Alpha Order 
initiated Walter Brandt, Omar Jack- 
son, Frank Macielag, Harold Martin, 
and Judson Williams. 

Alumni returning to the House for 
the week-end were Charles Fetter, 
'41, John Selby, '41, James Spielman, 
'41, William Buckingham, '41, Auvan j 
Smith, '41. 

Phil Souder was elected to fill the! 
II position which was left open by the 
failure of Spencer Robinson to re- 
turn to college. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

On Tuesday evening, Epsilon Theta 
Chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha pledg- 
ed Thomas Eliason and Laurence 
Brice, both Seniors. Both are Day 
Students. 

Donnell Fraser, '41, was a campus 
visitor over the week-end. 
Theta Chi 

The annual convention of the The- 
ta Chi Fraternity was held in the 
Claremont Hotel, Berkely, California, 
beginning September 6. The chap- 
ters at the University of California in 
Berkely and at Stanford in Palo Alto 
acted as hosts. 

A special train out* of Chicago con- 
veyed the delegates to the west coast 
and return. The northern route was 
taken by the outgoing train, and the 
southern route by the returning train. 

Harry E. Lore, of Bridgeton, New 
Jersey, was the official delegate from 
Beta Eta Chapter of Washington Col- 
lege. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Jean Wheatley, '41, and Dorothy 

Leonard, '41, visited the campus last 

week-end. Jean and Dottie are char- 

(Continued on Page 4) 



CHURCHILL 

THE HOUSE OF HITS 
Church Hill Phone 2391 



2 Shows Nightly - 7 & 9 Matinee Saturday 2 P. M. 



Sat. ' Mon. » Tues. Oct. 4-6-7 

A ROWDY, RACY, RIOTOUS COMEDY! 




Scr««n r>i BV by p i woihor. ■ A JOHN M. STAHL PRODUCTION ■ pi,« f ..d b v johnm.stahi 



Wed.-Thur.-Fri. Sat. Oct. 8-9-10-11 



JON HALL pp 




Paramount's music-filled thrill spectacU 

« fllowing 7£C#/\f/C&lQZ/ 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCT. 3, 1941 



'No Team Scheduled Has Advantage Over 

Sho'men" - Ekaitis. "Team Best In Years' 



*\\XNNNN\NNVNNN\\VVVXNVV\\NVNV\\VNVNSVN\\\V\VV\S\\N\ 

NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 



Team Is Impressive Ir 
Scrimmages Of 
Season 



First 



First Games 

As Expected 



Mt. St. Mary's, Blue Ridge 

Numbered Among State's 

Defeated 



The Shoremen of Washington Col- 
lege, under the direction of Coach 
Ekaitis and ably assisted by Coach 
Kibler and Dave Bartolini, have been 
progressing very rapidly for the open- 
ing game against Johns Hopkins on 
Kibler Field October 11. This year, 
Coach Ekaitis has introduced a new 
system in an effort to produce a scor- 
ing punch. The old saying has it 
that a good offense is the best de- 
fense and this is just what Ekaitis is 
striving for. More stress will be put 
on the areial game and a man in mo- 
tion will be very much in evidence. 

Two very impressive scrimmages 
were held during the past week and 
show indications of developing into a 
powerful scoring; machine. Among 
the outstanding lettermen who will be 
available for action are Ray Kirby, 
all-Maryland guard from last year, Al 
Dudderar, a potential candidate for 
this year's all-Maryland team at cen- 
ter, Frank Gibe, who will be Kirby's 
running mate at guard, Wilson Reidy 
and Ray Sinclair will be the pair of 
hard charging tackles who will give 
the opposition plenty of trouble. The 
wings will probably be taken care of I 
by Bill Benjamin, who can really go 
up in the air after the ball and Marty 
Warther with plenty of opposition 
coming from a couple of freshmen 
ends, Loll and Svec, who looked very 
impressive on defense. 
Yerkes, Messick Offensive Threats 
The tricky offense will be center- 
ed around Lou Yerkes who will do the, of the W. C. campus, 
passing, kicking and handle quite a ■"- 
bit of the running. Also in this 
backfield will be Jean "Bull" Messick 
who will be counted on to do the 
plunging. The wing selection as yet 



Football in Maryland began Satur- 
day with no upsets and no unexpect- 
ed victories. As expected Mount St. 
Mary's and Blue Ridge went down be- 
fore more experienced and more pow- 
erful opponents, while Navy, Mary- 
land, and Western Maryland over- 
came their opposition with surprising 
power. 

Navy put a very strong team on the 
field against William and Mary and 
although Swede Larson used four 
complete teams they crushed the Vir- 
ginians with little trouble. Bill 
Busilc, Sammy Boothe, Bill Chewing, 
Bob Zoellcr, Dick Opp, and Howie 
Clark showed their potential strength 
by walking straight through the Wil- 
liam and Mary line. Last year the 
experts picked Navy as having the 
strongest defensive team in the East, 



and judging by last week's game it, 
appears that they have not let up a 
bit. 

With the excellent help of sopho- 
mores Wright, Barnes, Mont, and 
Mier in the Maryland backfield the 
Terps revenged their last year's de- 
feat by crushing a none-too-strong 
Hampden-Sidney eleven. If the 
Terps had a schedule excluding Pcnn 
and Duke" they would have an excel- 
lent change to come through the sea- 
son undefeated but as it stands it is 
doubtful as to whether they can cope 
with the strength and strategy of the 
larger squads. 

In crushing a mediocre Cortland 
Teachers club Western Maryland 
showed a good strong rushing attack 
sparked by Art ■O'Keefe playing his 
first varsity game and scoring two 
touchdowns. A very definite weak- 
ness was seen in Western Maryland's 
pass defense which if not corrected 
will prove disastrous. 

The state teams having the best 
chances for noticeable records are 
Navy, Maryland and Washington Col- 
lege. 



GIRL 'S 

SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



Monday, September 29, marked the 
beginning of the 1941 hockey season 
This year, as 
the past, the first few weeks will 
be spent in preliminary practice. Dui 
ing this time, upper classmen brush 
up on hockey techniques and Fresh' 
men art taught the fundamentals of 



is not certain for Jackson, Freeman, i the game. Gym classes serve to cor 



and McLaughlin have all looked pret- 
ty good in this spot. The blocking 
will be taken care of by Frank Macie- 
lag and a freshman named Grey. 



relate this training so that, before 
games begin, every girl is familiar 
with the general rules. 

It should be noted that only 



CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



MON. - TUES. - WED., OCTOBER 6-7-8 
It's Better Than Good . . . It's Perfect. 
M-G-M's Big New Musical Sensation. 

"LADY BE GOOD" 

— Starring — 

ELEANOR POWELL - ANN SOTHERN 

ROBERT YOUNG - RED SKELTON 

LIONEL BARRYMORE 
Everything you've heard about it is true. 
A Musical thrill. A tap-happy thrill. A 
Star-studded love and laugh thrill. A 
must see hit. 



THUR. - FRI. - SAT., OCTOBER 9-10-11 
—BIG DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM— 

"BADLANDS OF DAKOTA" 

— with — ■ 
RICHARD DIX - FRANCES FARMER 
ROBERT STACK - ANN RUTHERFORD 
HUGH HERBERT - BROD CRAWFORD 
Here It Is At Last . . . the sensational suc- 
cessor to "When The Daltons Rode." 
— Plus— 
RICHARD ARLEN - ANDY DEVINE 

"A DANGEROUS GAME" 



5*N%A\*S**X\N**XSX**NNNV'5tVVNVk>>*NVkNNXSX\N\\\\*>.*v; 



fl srm 



$0 






L 



The replacement situation is ! shrewd bargaining do we have 
brighter than it has been for years! privilege of using English hockey 
with such outstanding men as Gail' -ticks this year. They are in great 
Steele and Marlin Storm at tackles demand in all colleges and, due to the 
and Dougherty and Benjamin at war, English manufacturers have 
guards. Dudderar's Replacement at j been forced to discontinue making 
center will probably be taken care of them. Although few of us appreci- 
by either Slade or Mackrell, who is aUte the differences between English 
freshman from Collingswood. Coach and American sticks, anyone who 
Ekaitis-s opinion is that no team on specializes in Physical Ed knows that 
this year's schedule has any reason- English sticks are far superior. They 
able advantage over the Shoremen 1 aie m01 ' e Perfectly balanced and the 
and claims this to be one of his bestl curved end for striking is much long- 




teams since he's been on the Hil 



Football Game Today 

High interest on the campus is cen- 
tered around the first inter-squad 
football game which will be held on 
Kibler Field tomorrow afternoon, 
Saturday, at 2:30. The entire foot- 
ball squad has been divided into two 
teams, one called the Black Team and 
the other is to be named the White 
Team. 



making them a great aid to guod 
hockey. 

If enthusiasm is a sign of skill, the 
Freshman class will be top-notch 
competitors. Many of them are al- 
ready keeping training rules and per- 
fecting grips and strokes. Until next 
week there is little to be said of their 
potentialities as a team, so until then 
they are only a threat and a menace 
to the upper classmen. 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber. Milr Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone 5 



PENNINGTON 

CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builder 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campu* Av 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



With The Greeks . . . 

(Continued from Page 3) 
I ter members of Gamma Beta Chap 
tei\ Mildred Brooks is to be guest 
I of honor at a linen shower Saturday 
(afternoon given by Charlotte, Lanny, 
and Naomi Russell at their home on 
Kent Circle. 
Alpha Omicron Pi 
I Sunday, September 28, the Sigma 
Tau Chapter of Alpha Omicron Pi 
entertained their patronesses and 
local alumnae at a tea in their sorori- 
ty room at three o'clock. 






| 
I 



A Herbarium that eventually will 
contain every available species of 
plant native to Georgia is being de- 
veloped in the biology department of 
Emory University. 



and 111 give you back 15 seconds 

Says Paul Douglas, 

well-known radio announcer 

•Somebody whistles a few bars of a catchy tune. 

Others pick it up. 

Soon the whole country's whistling it. It's a hit, 

Somebody lights up a cigarette. 
Likes it. Passes the word along. 
Soon the whole country's smoking it. 
It's a kit. Irs Chesterfield. 

The big thing that's pushing Chesterfield ahead 
Is the approval of smokers like yourself. 
Chesterfields are definitely Milder, 

Cooler-Smoking and Better-Tasting. 
They're made of the world's best cigarette tobaccos 
Blended just right to give you more smoking pleasure. 

But even these facts wouldn't count 
If smokers didn't just naturally like them. 
Once a smoker finds out from Chesterfield 
What real smoking pleasure is, nothing else will do. 
Yes, fellow smokers, IT'S YOUR APPROVAL 
THAT'S PUSHING CHESTERFIELD AHEAD. 

Everywhere you go 





Copjrijhi 1W1, Litem 4 Mkem ToitcM Co. 



NEW.S ii\ 
BRIEF. . . . 

First Play Is Chosen 

'Smilin' Through" has been select 
ed as the first production of the 
Washington Players, to be given on 
December 6. The club approved the 
selection of the committee at last 
night's meeting. Dr. Tolles, director 
for the group, pointed out that there 
',-ould be five male and five women's 
parts in the costume play. 

It was further decided at the meet- 
ing to have an inter-class competition 
of plays to be under the supervision 
of the class presidents. One guest 
program has been planned, and an as- 
sembly program has been approved. 



Historians Hear Harris 

Mr. Walter B. Harris, Jr., president 
of the Kent County Historical Socie- 
ty, spoke at the meeting of the Col- 
lege Historical Society this week. 
Mr. Harris revealed to the organiza- 
tion what it could do to help with the 
Kent County Tercentenary in July 
nnd August, 1942. 

Philip Soudcr, conducting the meet- 
ing, supervised the classifying and 
tiling of old documents. 



Balch Assembly Speaker 

Mr. Herbert H. Balch, prominent 
attorney of Easton, Md., will be the 
assembly speaker for October 16th, 

;ording to Mr. Goodwin. His top- 
ic will be "The Life of General Rob- 
ert E. Lee." 

Senator Davis, originally scheduled 
to speak yesterday, will appear on a 
later program. 



Be At The Pep Meeting Tonight! 



"V" 



I he 




JLmlii 



"V" 



Vol. XLI. No. 3. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN. MD., FRIDAY, OCT. 3, 1941 



Price Five Cents 



Dozen Coeds 
Are To Model 
Fall Fashions 



Record Throngs p ep Rally, Game, Dance 



Elm Cooperates With Paca 

Shop In Staging Style Show 

Here October 24 



Scientists Hold Meeting 

The first meeting of the Society of 
Sciences was held Wednesday even- 
ing in Dunning Hall. The accom- 
plishments of the club last year were 
reviewed by President Diacumakos 
and plans were outlined for the pres- 
ent year's work. The president ex- 
pressed a desire for more trips to 
museums; such as, Smithsonian Insti- 
tute and Franklin Institute. It was 
proposed that membership pins be 
awarded, but action was deferred. 
Splendid programs of an entertaining, 
as well as of an informative, nature 
presented. Everyone interested 
in sciences is invited to become a 
member. 



Student models will display the lat- 
est styles in a Fall .Fashion Show to 
be held in the auditorium of William 
Smith Hall on October 24. 

The show is being sponsored by the 
Elm, in cooperation with the Paca 
Dress Shop. Rufus Johnson, busi- 
ness manager of the Elm, Miss Doro- 
thy Paca, and Miss Doris T. Bell are 
in charge. 

The twelve or fourteen feminine 
models will be selected and trained by 
Miss Bell. Before the selections can 
be mnde, she said, there will have to 
be fittings of the dresses. It is pos- 
sible that several boys may be used 
for local color. 

Full plans have not been formulat- 
ed yet, since Miss Paca is still corres- 
ponding with the manufacturers. The 
Gay Gibson Junior Dress Company, 
whose models are being shown, will 
give two dresses as prizes — one to the 
person selling the greatest number of 
tickets, and one as a door prize. 

Every one connected with the show 
is obliged to buy a ticket, Johnson 
said, thus making all of them eligible 
for the door prize. The winners of 
the prizes will have a selection of any 
Gay Gibson Junior Dress within a 
price range to be set. 

According to present plans, the 
orchestra will play for the show. 



Lore On Board 
Of Publications 



Are Anticipated 
At Homecoming 

Hudson, Cummins Orchestras 

To Play At Dances 

Next Week-end 



Attendance records for the annual 
fall home-coming will be shattered 
next week-end, if plans of the various 
campus organizations for an unusual- 
ly full program are blessed with good 
weather. 

The football game with Randolph- 
Macon on Saturday afternoon will be 
the feature event. At present, spirit 
is running high on the campus, and 
a victory to avenge last year's 13 to 
7 defeat is expected. Following the 
"Pep Meeting" Friday night will be 
the annual "Pajama Party." Fresh- 
men will march around town and end 
| up at the annual bon-fire on the field 
below' the gridiron. Wood for the 
fire will have been previously gather- 
ed by the Freshmen under the care- 
ful supervision of the Sophomores. 
It is rumored that the Freshmen plan 
to keep guard on the wood to prevent 
any "accidental" fire. 

On Saturday evening there will be 
two gala dances in celebration of this 
old homecoming tradition. Joe Hud- 
son and his Orchestra, from Wilming- 
ton, will furnish the music for the un- 
dergraduate dance from 8 to 11:45 in 
the Cain Gymnasium. The Varsity 



Dances Must Pay 

The "self-supporting" part of Dr. 
Livingood's announcement allowing 
aiited informals has been re-em T 
phasized by him. "If the students 
Want informal dances," he stated, 
'the dances will have to be self-sus- 
taining and self-supporting. There is 
no necessity for ODK's continuous 
financial losses suffered at every 
dance. The dance tomorrow night 
be an indication whether the stu- 
dents really want dances or not." 



Miss Snodgrass Returns 

Miss Florence Snodgrass, who has 
been absent from school during these 
first two weeks because of the illness 
of her mother has returned to take up 
her duties in the Department of Edu- 
cation. 



Library Privilege Granted 

The Freshman girls were granted a 
library privilege of one night to be 
based upon the honor system. This 
ilege was granted by the Reid 
Hall Council this week due to the 
freshmen's cooperation with the coun- 
cil. 



Pegasus Calls Meeting 

All persons interested in the 
business work on the Pegasus 
please meet in the Pegasus of- 
fice on Monday at 4:00 p. m. 



Men's StudentCouncilDemands 
Representation On Board 



To Head Social Calendar 



Want Your I. Q. Test? Wait 
Till You're A Senior 



Yesterday's assembly period was 
even more grueling than usual for 
the upperclassmen. They took their 
I. Q. tests. 

According to Dr. Livingood, these 
tests are not as indicative of a stu- 
dent's college work as are his high 
school grades. Only thirty-seven per 
cent, of the students do work in ac- 
cordance with their I. Q.'s, but sixty- 
seven per cent, of them ro work com- 
parable to that which they did in high 
school. 

As to whether or not it is advisable 
to give underclassmen the I. Q.'s, Dr. 
Livingood has not yet decided. But 
the seniors can get theirs.' One copy 
of their comulative I. Q. is kept in 
the Administrative offices' files, one 
is for the seniors, and one is kept for 
references. 



Club will sponsor this hop. Bob 
Cummins and his band, also from Wil- 
mington, will play at the annual 
Alumni Dance at the Chester River 
Yacht and Country Club from 9 to 1. 
In addition to these activities, the 
fraternities and sororities will wel- 
come their alumni back. It is prob- 
able that all the fraternities will give 
intermission parties. 



Dr. Howell Sees Goldbricking 

Reason For Cut System Change 



'Boys Primarily Responsible For Change" Registrar Asserts 
As Elm Reporter Cross-Examines Him 



Harry E. Lore, Jr., will take his 
lace on the .1941-42 Board of Stu- 
dent Publications as the representa- 
tive of the Student. Council, as the re- 
sult of action taken by Dr. Mead at a 
meeting in Dean Livingood's office 
yesterday afternoon. This appoint- 
ment will bring the membership of 
the Board, previously appointed by 
Dr. Mead, to a total of eight, five of 
whom are students. 

The meeting yesterday was called 
to straighten out the problem of the 
relationship of the Board of Student 
Publications to the Student Council. 
Ray Kirby, Harry Lore, and Robert 
Crane represented the Council; Dr. 
Werner the Board; and Dean Livin- 
good was a neutral arbitrator. After 
a long discussion, Dr. Mead joined 
the group and an understanding was 
soon reached. 

At a meeting of the Council last 
spring, a motion had passed making 
the vice-president of the Council a 
member of the Board. This motion 
had never been carried into effect. At 
the Council meeting Monday night, 
this matter came up, and yesterday's 
meeting was the result. 

Further action by the Council i; 
expected to insure that its represent- 
ative will be a member of ODK also 
Since Lore is president of ODK, im- 
mediate action was not deemed neces- 
sary. 



"Gold-bricking is the cause of the 
latest change" said Dr. Howell lean- 
ing back in his chair and with an ex- 
pression of mild skepticism concern- 
ing an ELM reporter's inquiries about 
the merits of the present system and 
the ups and downs of cut systems gen- 
erally during the past twenty years 
which lie within Dr. Howell's memory 
as a member of the college faculty. 

"Well," he said, "I came here in 
1921 and the cut system just abolish- 
ed has been in since 1923." Before 
that Dr. Howell's memory is verj 
vague but inspection of the catalogue 
shows that it was much like the one 
just abolished. For every 16 cuts 
one hour was deducted, however there' 
was no stipulation as to how many 
cuts you could have in each course. 
Also there were' no money fines in- 
volved or fines for cuts after a holi- 
day. This system was in use during 
those first two years Dr. Howell was 
here. Then the faculty, realizing the 
impracticability of the system order- 
ed an investigation. 

The system used for 17 years then 
came in — the one most of us griped 
about but wish we had back. You 
were allowed as many cuts in a 
course as the hours you took it per 
week. Any cut over the three, two 
or one as the case, you were fined two 
dollars to be re-instated in the class 
and given an exam on the work up to 
that point. This, however, was left 
to the discretion of the professor. 
Sick cuts only eounted a half cut and 



herein lies the rub according to Dr. 
Howell. People took advantage of 



Dr. William R. Howell 




Registrar 



this, and the boys are the ones who 
caught on quickest. 

As to the present cut system. Dr. 
Howell refuses to commit himself; 
however he seemed to think that the 
system is impractical. It isn't fair 
to those students who are honestly of 
poor health and subject to small ill- 
nesses. Fines are still imposed for 
over-cutting. 



Dr. Mead Opens First Pep 

Rally; Girl Cheerleaders 

Make Initial Appearance 



Three main events have been plan- 
ned this week-end to open the social 
and athletic activities for the year. 
The Pep Meeting tonight at 7:30, the 
football game tomorrow afternoon at 
2:30, and the ODK informal dance 
tomorrow night at 8 o'clock consti- 
tute the program. 

Tonight's Pep Meeting, the first 
this season, will be opened with a 
brief address by Dr. Mead. For the 
benefit of the Freshmen, the purpose 
of these meetings is to stir up school 
spirit. According to the faculty and 
student body, Washington in the last 
few years has failed to show the en- 
thusiasm necessary for a winning 
team. You are expected to "drum 
out" the student body by beating on 
old pans and cans, by singing school 
songs, and by giving cheers. To aid 
in building up school spirit and 
heightening interest in the team, 
Coach Ekaitis and the Senior mem- 
bers of the squad will say a few words 
at the meeting. Rudy Parks and his 
String Ensemble will furnish music 
for the occasion. 

Wilbert Patterson, Head Cheer- 
leader, has announced that eight girls 
(Continued on Page 4) 



College To Hold 
Art Week Show 



Exhibition Will Be Featured In 
Musuem Nov. 17, 18, 19 



National Art Week will be cele- 
brated at the College on November 
17, 18 and 19 by a special exhibit to 
be held in the Museum Room of the 
George Avery Bunting Library, Dr. 
Mead's office announced yesterday. 

A preliminary meeting was held by 
the local committee, headed by Dr. 
Esther M. Dole, this week. Assist- 
ing her are Mrs. Julian D. Corrington, 
Mrs. H. O. Werner, and Mr. and Mrs. 
George Keester. 

Twelve to fifteen artists of Kent 
county and vicinity will be invited to 
enter water colors, oils, and other art 
work in the show. Students who 
paint or draw are especially solicited 
by Dr. Dole, for it is hoped to have 
the College well represented. The 
local grade and high schools are also 
being invited to submit material. 

Plans are underway for a tea and 
special opening with the Reid Hall 
Council assisting the committee, on 
Monday afternoon, November 17. 

The purpose of the exhibit, accord- 
ing to Dr. Dole, is to encourage art in 
this community and to bring to the 
attention of students and of residents 
of the county the large amount of in- 
teresting work coming from the 
brushes, pens, and pencils of local art- 
ists. 



PAGE TWO 

THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 
Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Junior Board 
James Aycoek Don McClcIlan Phyllis Peters 

Molly Blackwood Leonard Parris William Roe 

Dian Hubbard Ellen Peters Naomi Russell 

Sophomore Board 
Patsy Frary Dorothy Reidy Gretchen Smith 

Robert Hill Norman Sharver John R. Smith 

Frank Macielag Gaylord Steele 

Business Staff 

Robert Livingston Clarence Valentine James Juliana 
Hairy Slade Edwin Boyer Joseph McLaughlin 

Business Manager Ru f «s C. Johnson 

Dr. H. 0. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1941 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1941 



Desk Editor lor this issue M - Blackwood 

Assistants Aycoek and P. Peters 



Iniormals Must Be Self-Supporting 

It's an old, old story, I know, but this year it means some- 
thing. 

A theatre is a flop if it does not attract sufficient customers 
to pay the expenses and leave a balance. An ODK dance is 
not the success it should be if it does not support itself. This 
year, it is very probable that they will not be given if they do 
not do just that. Everyone knows, of course, that it is neither 
the purpose nor the desire of ODK to make money from the 
dances which it gives. But, at the same time, everyone must 
remember that an aim of ODK is to give financial aid to activi- 
ties from which the most students receive benefit. The past at- 
tendance at the dances has shown that the dances are not self- 
supporting. At the same time, it shows that a minority of stu- 
dents are receiving a large total appropriation by the end of the 
year. This cannot continue to be true. 

So, let's remember that we are in college, that we are liv- 
ing part, of our best days now, that dances are an absolute ne- 
cessity to our college social life, that ODK dances are scheduled 
to fill gaps in our social calendar, that we now have dance in- 
struction classes, and finally, that we should not forget to go to 
the ODK informal this Saturday evening. R. C. J. 



Pan-Hellenic President Holds 

Sorority Preparatory To Life 



, President ofr 
cil, ha. writ- 1 
ELM the fol- 1 



Mary Liz Humph: 
the Pan-Hellenic C 
ten especially for 1 
lowing sorority woi 
the Freshmen girls. 

In these dark times of rushing the 
true meaning of sorority often van- 
ishes; and a freshman, if she stops to 
question, sometimes wonders, what 
good is there in joining a sorority? 

Sororities are more an example of 
what to expect of life than any one 
thing on the campus. You must 
learn cooperation; without unity the. 
sorority ceases to function. It teach- 1 



es you to cooperate with girls of 
another sorority, to compromise if 
opinions differ and to accept another 
point of view. 

You must take responsibility. It 
gradually molds a girl from a pledge 
to a senior officer. It brings out ini- 
tiative, originality, character. It 
helps to modify qualities of selfish- 
ness, sportness, and narrow Blind- 
ness. 

While college studies contribute the 
mechanical tools for making a living, 
sororities give the personality to be 
outstanding. 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



We read in the Loyola GREY- 
HOUND that Bob Hope of Hollywood 
and radio fame took part in the 
Freshman Activities week at Loyola 
College in Baltimore last week ... A 
write-up in the DIAMONDBACK of 
the U. of M.- last week listed nine 
good reasons why the Terps should 
beat Western Maryland in football 
. . . Co-Captain Al Dudderar says the 
Sho'men this week should beat Hop- 
kins by four touchdowns . . . Doc 
Parris is fast becoming a Reid Hall 
Cadet. 



wards cheer practice is somethii 
else that should be looked into. 

Confidentially, we have it that this 
year's Homecoming is going to top all 
records for attendance and gaiety. If 
the students would get the same pep 
and spirit that many of the grads 
have, this would be even a happier 
place to live . . . Helen Marie should 
make sure that the next time she 
waves to the b'hoys, that Coach Ekai- 
tis isn't around. 

For the interest of those people 
i who wish to have articles printed in 
the ELM, all stories must be in our 
office by three o'clock Wednesday af- 
ternoon to be considered. Anything 
later than this, unless it is big 
enough to make the headlines, will 
not be printed. Also, only type- 
written matter will be accepted . . . 
We wonder how many years it will he 
before the traditional secret cylinder 



NORTHEAST 
^CORNER 



What apparently was a better sys- 
tem of book reserves is turning out to 
be just the opposite for students. The 
right book is almost impossible to ob- 
tain unless you have the complete In- 
formation that would be on the files 
in your head . . . Those Sophomores 
weren't so tough after all. After 
less than a month here, many of the Ter P 
Freshmen are making a habitual use 
of the Sacred "L" and front door of 



which Rufus Johnson hid on the cam- 
pus this week will be found. Ac- 
cording to statistics, it won't be found 
again until the 1960's . . . While 
Washington College will be out an 
the field tomorrow afternoon giving 
Hopkins a good licking, the Blue 
Devils from Duke will be taking the 
of Maryland for what appears 
be one of the greatest defeats in 
this year's football records. 



William Smith and Rat Caps and We hear rumors that a fourth fra- 

Identification Buttcns on some would ternity is in the process of being 

be positively shocking . . . The atti- formed on the campus. So long, and 

tudes of many of the Freshmen to- thirty. Beat Hopkins!!! 



Dr. Ford Bids "Bienvenida" 

To Both Old And New Students 

This is the third and last of a ser- (Lo ha estimado mi honor) que le 
foreign languages i diese a este colegio su proprio nom- 



Choose Sororities Carefully 

Rushing, — civilized hair-pulling. And to think that you 
Freshmen don't realize what's going on. "We were rushed the 
first night, and that was all", we hear you say. Well, girls, 
you'd better acknowledge the fact that we aren't doing ail this 
through generosity. For though Washington is known as the 
"friendly college" with good cause, it is unnatural for any of us 
to be so forward. 

Bids come out the twenty-fourth, so start considering the 
true nature of the girls who are rushing you. For, as I have 
said, we are rushing you; it's complimentary to the sororities to 
admit they are so subtle, but every one of us is putting her best 
foot forward during this first month of school. 

Of course, your Pan-Hellenic pamphlets give you the rush- 
ing rules, but they don't tell you on what points to judge the 
particular groups. We sorority girls do that. Some of us say 
not to join'because of the Seniors, but the Seniors were selected 
by girls like themselves, and they in turn selected the under- 
classmen. They are as representative of the group and its pol- 
icy as any of the others. The Chinese believe that the older 
people because of their wisdom, should be the ones to make de- 
cisions concerning the group. What if the Seniors aren't going 
to be here long; they'll still be your sorority sisters. 

You will probably be told to "go the way your friends go.' 
Yet there have been cases where girls have joined a sorority be 
cause their friends of the first week of school were joining it. 
They later found they had nothing in common with the other 
girls of the group and so were left on the fringes of most gath- 
erings. If you are true friends, the sororities won't separate 
you; and if, as in many cases, the cameraderie slackens, you 
find yourself in an uncongenial group. 

The best way is to pick the group of girls most like you 
They're bound to select all their pledges with the same char- 
acteristics in mind. M. D. B 



es of articles 

which has been an educational fea< 

ture of the ELM. 

by Dr. Lawrence Ford 

Como ya lo han hecho mis colegas 
del Depaitamento de las Lengnas 
Modernas, quisiera dar por mi mismo 
bienvenida a Washington College 
a todos nuestros estudiantes, tanto a' 
los que han vuelto como a los que 
tan este colegio historico en ia 
capacidad de estudiantes de primer 
ano. Ilustr.es y nobles son las tra- 
diciones de nuestro colegio, — digo 
"nuestro colegio" porque Washington 
College pertenece a nosotros todos. 
Bien lo saben los que han sido 
hijos carinosos durante todos 
largos tiempos pasados, esos tiempos! lege, lo 



bre. Los estudiantes recientementc 
llegados lo aprenderan muy pronto. 

Me ha dado mucho gusto personal 
el gran numero de estaudiaptes que 
han registrado para sequir cursos de 
]a lengua la literatura espanola e his- 
pano-americana. Fuera del Canada 
y del Brasil, casi todos nuestros ve- 
cinos de este hemisferio son hispano- 
americanos de nacionalidad, espanoles 
de lengua, de raza, de sangre, y de 
civilizacion. Nuestro gobierno lo 
reconoce; el enemigo lo reconoce; es 
imperativo que nosotros, los pro- 
fesores y los estudiantes de los coleg- 
usjios de los Estados Unidos lo recon- 
esosjozcan. Y aqui, a Washington Col- 
econocemos, con nuestra 



casi antiguos, casi olvidados, el ilus- registraeion en los clases de espanol 
trisimo fundador de nuestra patria'de casi ciento cuarenta estudiantes. 



With The 



Greeks 



Kappa Alpha 

Visiting the KA House last week- 
end were Brothers Bill Buckingham, 
Eddie McCauley, Charlie Fetter, Nor- 
man Shorb, and John Selby. A 
large number are expected to return 
for Homecoming. 

This year's first issue of the Chap- 
ter paper, THE B. 0. NEWS, will be 
out today or tomorrow, according to 
Editor Jones. 



Alpha Chi Omega 

The Alpha Chi Omega Sorority en- 
tertained twenty-two girls at its al- 



ways successful Pirate's Den Party 
Wednesday evening in Reid Hall. The 
decorations carried out the atmos- 
phere of a pirate's den and the girls 
were served from a steaming pot of 
chile con came. Entertainment was 
supplied by the Alpha Chi Chorines 
with original songs and dances by 
Dian Hubbard. 



Zeta Tau Alpha 

Dr. Esther M. Dole and her dau- 
ghter, Mrs. Keester, entertained the 
members of Zeta Tau Alpha at dinner 
Wednesday evening. 

At the meeting of the sorority on 
Monday it was announced that Mrs. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



ACE Committee Offers Summary 
One of the sub-committees of the 
American Council on Education, 
charged with the investigation and 
analysis of the relation of the college 
students to national defense, makes 
an interesting comment on genera] 
attitudes in its report recently re- 
leased. In addition to a discussion nf 
special courses and unusual activities 
for defense training, the committee 
takes the opportunity to summarize 
certain convictions regarding general 
attitudes and points of view, as well 
as pointing out certain shortcoming,, 
not in course materials and specifical- 
ly defense activities, but in "intang. 
ibles". Here is what they say: 

Attention Called To Intangibles 

"The Subcommittee deems it worth 
while to call attention to the intniig. 
ibles which should be cultivated es 
pecially at a time when the country 
needs each person at his best. The 
lack of these essential characteristics 
is repeatedly stressed by those who 
seek to utilize the services of college 
graduates. 

1. College graduates eminently 
need to be able to follow instruction! 
and meet obligations without being 
reminded of them. 

2. College graduates would be 
more valuable if they had greater fa- 
cility in handling figures and quanti- 
tative data in general. 

3. College graduates would be 
much more serviceable if they had 
the initiative to find out what ought 
to be done and how to do it, in the 
normal routines of a job. 

4. College graduates are accused 
of too much self-interest in their 
activities. 

5. College graduates seem to lack 
convictions based on knowledge and 
even to be afraid of acquiring the 
knowledge necessary for the formu- 
lation of convictions. 

Opportunities For Students 
To the degree that these sugges- 
tions point out opportunities for stu- 
dents to render more effective ser- 
vice, it would seem especially suitable 
for college partners — student and 
faculty members — to explore wayj 
and means of achievingtruecharacter- 
istics and atitudes involved, espec- 
ially at a time of such heightened and 
immediate need. 

There is an emphasized need ol 
self-discipline in time of defense, and 
almost every college activity, aca- 
demic and non-academic, otters an op- 
portunity for the development of self- 
discipline. College students have ev- 
ery right to regard themselves as 
serving their country in learning and 
practicing such discipline in the high 
est degree." 

The judgments detailed above were 
not those of the college president! 
and deans who formed the larger por 
tion of the committee. These wer< 
the results of their investigation 
among the men and women of ttif 
professional and business world whos£ 
duty it is to supervise the activities 
into which college graduates are go- 
ing when they leave the campuses. A: 
such, it is a hint to every college mat 
and woman from his potential fututf 
employer as to some things he has 
been expecting from his college 
trained employees, and hasmissedsee- 
ing in them. The hint is given 1* 
those now in college, so that they maJ 
be better able to take responsibilitJ 
when their time comes — which will b< 
all too soon. 

— Gilbert W. Mead 



Syracuse and Colgate footbal 
teams will play each other twice 
1943 — October 2 at Hamilton an 
November 12 at Syracuse. 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



FORD and MERCURY 
Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Cheatertown, Md. 



The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



Cain's "Mildred Pierce" Relates With 
Hard-Boiled Mother Love Story = 



The- 



Jamie Cain, Washington Alumnus, Jolts His Readers Again 
With One For Uncle Bill's Stocking 



Dr. W. H. Moyer 

CHIROPRACTOR 
X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 



Jamie Cain has written another 
novel. Clifton Fadiman's given it a 
rafae review in THE NEW YORKER. 
Knopf, Cain's publisher, ran the re- 
view in toto as an ad in the New 
York TIMES. Sales should double 
or triple the ten thousand copies of 
most successful novels, and every fra- 
ternity on the Hill should dig in for 
the two fifty necessary to get "Mil- 
dred Pierce," as the novel is titled, 
up onto the shelf next to the Harvard 
Classics, where it won't stay very long 
anyway, for the covers will be read 
off it before Christmas recess, or I 
miss my guess. 

Cam Is Alumnus Of 1910 

Jamie was christened James Malla- 

han in Annapolis in the year of his 

birth, 1892. He came to Chester- 

ftown in 1903 when his father, James 

W. Cain, left a professorship at St. 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



Kent County Savings Bank 

Commercial and Savings 
Accounts 

Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 

Radio Headquarters 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builders 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campus Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 




gets out and digs. Nine years later 
and the end of the novel, and we have 
followed her feverish course through 
two divorces, , two marriages, the 
birth, triumph, and death of a res- 
taurant and pie-baking business. One 
daughter has died; the other has 
grown into a coloratura soprano, a 
conscienceless wench, named Veda, 
who takes her mother's ex-polo-play- 
ing boy-friend-become-husband away 
from her, and leaves her tied up a- 
gain with Bert, the original husband, 
and in her original dilemma, a little 
sadder but no wiser. 
Put This One In Uncle Bill's Stocking 

If you have an uncle who under- 
stands the younger generation's tastes ! 
in hard boiled sex fiction, this novel 
should be tucked right into Unci 
Bill's Christmas stocking, but keep 
it away from dear Aunt Harriet, 
Neither as well written nor as horri- 
ble as Faulkner's "Sanctuary" and not 
to be compared with Heminway's 
best, "Mildred Pierce" is no great 
shakes as a novel. 

Cain travels fast on a low moral 
level. Technically he's slick. After 
ten pages you can't put the thing 
iown. I prefer Cain to Kathleen 
Morris, neither can do you much 
harm, and Cain at least gives you a 
jolt, where Norris et al. simply leaves 
you in your own complacency. 

H. O. W. 



(Continued from Page 2) 
Keester has accepted an invitation to 
become a patroness of the sorority. 
Mrs. Keester was a member of Gam- 
ma Sigma before it joined the nation- 
al fraternity of Zeta Tau Alpha. 

The sorority held its first rush par- 
ty of the year in Reid Hall on Thurs- 
day evening. All the guests and 
members dressed in farm costumes, 
smoked corn cob pipes and played 
barn yard games until eleven o'clock. 



Greeks Churchill 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 

Paints, Hardware and 

Farm Machinery 

Chestertown Phone 51 



Meet Your Class Mates 

— at— 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



MAC'S 



RADIO 



SHOP 



Kent Circle 



"The House Of Hil." 
CHURCH HILL . PHONE 2391 
Parting Room Galore 



LAST TIME 



■ SAT . OCT 11 



PRIMITIVE... PAG AN 

L'OVEir. an .xotlc. Melting 




CHESTERTOWN 

BANK 

OF 

MARYLAND 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 

Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 

Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



■HrV* 



OOROTHr 



Of TMf 



<3 



I 

4 



mil uws ,-V 

» BOM DIME 



«fe 

w 
>?• 



Oct. 13-14-15 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber, Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S, HOLLINGER, Prop. 
Phone 5 




IT'S 

GILL'S 

TONITE 

AND 

EVERY NITE 



John's to accept the presidency of 
Washington College. Known as an 
aggressive, intellectually alert fel- 
low, he took his A. B. here in 1910, 
stayed on as a member of the Depart- 
ment of English, took an A. M. in 
1917, and shortly left for newspaper- 
work and the army. 

1918-19 was spent with the A. E. 
F. "Sourpuss", as he was to become 
known among his newspaper friends, 
became editor-in-chief of the "Lor 
raine Cross", official publication of 
the 79th division, and made an easy 
transition into work with the Balti- 
more AMERICAN and Baltimore 
SUN when the war was over. 

He went back to college work in 
1923, but after a year as professor of 
journalism at St. John's and an argu 
ment with the president there, he left 
for New York and seven years on the 
staff of the New York WORLD. 

Twice married, once divorced, Cain 
momentarily holds the spot light as a 
Hollywood journalist, with two other 
successful novels — "The Postman 
Always Rings Twice" and "Sere- 
nade" — to his credit, a suit against a 
movie company for filching from the 
last of these two, and a general re- 
putation for the ability to write 
tricky, cynical realism that the su- 
perior Hollywood writer likes to turn 
out in his more conscientious moods", 
as Fadiman says. 
Mother Love Served Hard Boiled 

Mildred Pierce finds herself a grass 
.idow at 28, with two children, a 
heavily mortgaged house, a seductive 
pair of legs, and the ability to cook. 
She is an unimaginative, persistent 
female resident of Glendale, Califor- 
nia. Spurred on by mother love, she 



JOS. W. LEWIS 

Meats, Groceries, Etc. 

Phone 235 

Chestertown, Md. 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Tydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



The Nightly Collegiate Snack 

— AT— 

BILL BENNETT'S 

TONIGHT 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A complete line supplies plus all texts 
For all classes - 

OPEN- — 9 - 12; 2:15 - 5:15 



The Chestertown Light And Power Co. 

Runs Your — 

Radio, Clock, Study Lamp, and Electric Shaver. 

SUPPORT US 




My life with 
Caroline " 

Introducing 

ANNA LEE 



REGINALD GARDINER 
GILBERT ROLAND 
(CATHERINE LESLIE 
HUGH O'CONNELL 

Preduud and Dinaid by 
LEWIS MILESTONE 

AUniKd Fred gem Production 

WIIUAM HAWKS 
Bxtftilitt Pr Jj.tr 



COMING SOON 

Fred Astaire - Rita Hayworth 
"YOU'LL NEVER GET RICH'' 



PAGE FOOT 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 19 41 



Sho'men Chosen Over Blue Jays In Opener; 

Many Are Exp ected At Tonight's P ep Rally 



Sidelines 

Assistant Coach Bartolini, after 
last Saturday's scrimmage, says he 
lost six pounds chasing the boys up 
and down the field. Tough ■ gann , 
Dave. 

Stoney "da Harp" McLaughlin, 
bleary-eyed, gave the boys on the 
side-lines a laugh when he called, 
"Hey, fellows, what quarter is it?" 

Walt Brandt broke into a clear 
field in what looked like a tallcy 
when, to everybody's surprise, he 
plopped 8 yards short of the goal. Did 
ya trip, Walt? 

Coach Ekaitis's "Allah's" for rain 
have proved fruitless to date. Guess 
George ought to let the boys wear 
bathing suits and get sunburned. 

Prediction — I betcha we lick 
Blue Jays by three touchdowns. 



the 



Cassell, Daniel Of Sunpapers Pick 

Washington; Co-Captains And 

Coach Are Confident 

'The Sho'men, picked heavily over Johns Hopkins by the 
Baltimore Sports writers, will enter into the game with the Blue 
Jays tomorrow with plenty of confidence. The co-captains, Al 
Dudderar and Ray Kirby each claim a victory for the Maroons 
by at least three touchdowns. Coach George Ekaitis is a bit 
skeptical. "I'm glad to see confidence in the boys," he said, 
"but they may be in for a surprise." 

Randall Cassell, sports editor of the BALTIMORE EVEN- 
ING SUN writes of the game: "From what I saw of the two 
squads in early diills the Washington team will have experi- 
ence, weight, and more reserve strength than Hopkins. 
"Daniel," football selector for the BALTIMORE EVENING 
SUN picks the Sho'men without a doubt. 

Ten Veterans Will Start 

Coach Ekaitis announced that he 
would start ten veterans against the 
Blue Jays on Kihler Field tomorrow 
afternoon. The only Freshman who 
will be in for the kickoff is Bill Loll, 
a New Jersey boy, who will start at 
end in the place of Marty Warther. 

The backfield starting tomorrow af- 
ternoon will see fleet-footed Lew 
Yerkes, triple threat quarterback, as 
the main offensive cog. In the num- 
ber two slot will be husky Frank Mac- 
ielag who will clear the path for the 
ball-toters and do most of the punt- 
ing. In the other half-back spot will 
be "Omaha" Jackson, fast and a good 
pivoter. Along side Yerkes, in the 
line-bucking position will be "Bull" 
Messick, a Junior who is adding much 
strength to the Ekaitis backfield this 
year. 

Line And Reserves Strong 

On the line, co-captains Al Dudder- 
ar at center and Ray Kirby at guard 
form a bulwark of strength. These 
two boys, both seniors, are football 
"naturals" possessing plenty of driv- 
ing power. Frank Gibe, an experi 
enced Sophomore performs at the 
other guard position. Gibe became 
known last year as a 60-minute man. 

At the tackle positions will be Wil- 
son "Abner" Reidy, a sturdy and rug- 
ged man who stops his enemy cold. 
Ray Sinclair, at the other tackle, is a 
stocky and capable performer who 
can be counted upon. Benny Ben- 
jamin, lanky and experienced has 
looked especially good at pass snatch- 
ing in scrimmage this year and will 
have a starting berth at end tomor- 
row. Bill Loll, only starting fresh- 
man, will be at the other end of the 
line. 

Reserves Strong And Plentiful 

The reserve strength is very>prom- 
ising and Coach Ekaitis will not have 
trouble in handling replacements 
which will be numerous if tomorrow is 
hot. In "Stoney" McLaughlin, Bill 
Grey, Hal Freeman, Walt Brandt, 
and Al Nowak, he has five fine backs 
who will see plenty of action. Herb 
Morgan, Jim Juliana, and Billy Ho- 
ban are also in reserve for the back- 
field. 

Marty Warther, with a year's ex- 
perience under his belt will undoubt- 
edly see plenty of action at end while 
Jim Svec, a freshman, has also shown 
fine prospects at end. Doe Sladc. 
Billy Benjamin, Stoop Storm, Gayle 
Steele, Abe Mackrell and Jim Dougl: 
erty are an able bunch of line it 
serves who will play an important 
part in the Maroon and Black squad. 



These Men Plot Sho'men Attack 




Pep Meeting, Game And Dance 

Will Hold Social Light 

This Week-end 



Tomorrow's Lineup 

WASHINGTON JOHNS HOPKINS 



W. H. Benjamin LE 
Sinclair 
Kirby 
Dudderar 
Dougherty 
Reidy 
Loll 
Yerltes 
Messick 
Jackson 
Macielag 
Referee- 



LT 

LG 

C 

RG 

RT 

RE 

QB 
LH 
RH 
FB 
-Clem Spring, 



Alonso 

Pritchott 

Poll 

McCormick 

Westermeyer 

Voorker 

Parker 

Yog: 

Tredberg 

Roberts 

Russell 

St. John: 



Pictured above, reading from left to right, are Assistant 
Coach, Dave Bartolini; Co-Captains, Ray Kirby and Al Dud- 
derar, and Head Coach, George Ekaitis. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
find two boys will aid him this senst 
Mildred Powers, Dian Hubbard, Helen 
Marie Culver, Betty Lohnuiller, Vi r , 
ginia Cooper, Jean Graber, Joan Con. 
nors, and Grace Neighbour are thi 
feminine members, and Harold Mar. 
tin and Bob Pierce, the males. F 
terson plans to divide the girls i 
two teams of four. One group 
lead the cheers one week, and th* 
other, the next. 

Tomorrow afternoon, at 2:30, 
large crowd is expected to fill tht 
stands to see the Maroon and Blacl 
open against the Hopkins Blue Jay 
Not only will this be the first opuor. 
tunity to see the lauded team in a] 
tion, but also the first chance to i 
the coed cheerleaders do their stuff, 

The music of Jerry Killian ami hi] 
Orchestra will be heard in the Gym 
nasium tomorrow night at an inform- 
al dance sponsored by ODK. Thos< 
of you who attended the inform! 
dance on September 20 will remea 
ber how well the students receive 
the band. 



GIRL 'S 
SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



Umpire — William Lilly, Delaware. 
Linesman — Maury Eckelberger, 



New members of the Board of Man- 
agers were elected at a meeting last 
Wednesday. The girls from last year 
were retained; Ann Boiling was elect- 
ed to represent the Freshman class, 
while Francis Harris and Marianna 
Everngam were chosen to fill the two 
vacancies at large. 

During the hot fall days this week, 
there really hasn't been much en- 
thusiasm for hockey. Consequently, 
practice has been neither rigorous nor 
looked forward to usual. 

Miss Doris had divided the girls in- 
to different teams which, after work- 
outs on the preliminaries of the game, 
have been playing practice games. 
Most of the girls seem to like hockey, 



but this just isn't the right weather. 
All look forward to the fair and cooler 
days somewhere in the future. 

So, until then, we'll see you on the 

hockey field. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



Bob Carter Is Named 

New Football Manage 



Football coach, George Ekaitis, at 
nounced this week that Bob Carter 
senior, had been named head fool 
ball manager to fill a vacancy creat 
ed by the resignation of Lloyd Davis 



J. 5. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., OCT. 13 - 14 - 15 

Biggest Thing That Has Hit This Town 
Since "Boom Town." 

CLARK GABLE - LANA TURNER 
— in — 

"HONKY TONK" 

— with — 
FRANK MORGAN - CLAIRE TREVOR 
Here they are . . . the most magnetic 
pair in pictures in the rousing romance that 
makes screen history. A Great Hit. 



THUR. - FRI. - SAT., OCT. 16 - 17 - 18 

BIG DOUBLE FEATURE ATTRACTION 

A Scream-Lined Joy Ride 

"BROADWAY LIMITED" 

— with — 

VICTOR McLAGLEN - DENNIS O'KEEFE 

PATSY KELLY - ZAZU PITTS 

— Plus — 

"THE KID FROM KANSAS" 

— with — 

DICK FORAN - LEO CARRILLO 

ANDY DEVINE 



The 
Stam Drug Co. 

Chestertown 

Is Proud of Its 
Important Part 

In The Life 
of Your College 



For years this Drug Store has 
been the prescription store for 
Washington College students. 

This in itself is an honor and 
we are proud of the confidence 
your college physician has 
placed in our ability to capably 
fill your prescriptions. 

We also specialize in: 
WHITMAN'S CANDY SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

COSMETICS GIFT CARDS 

COMPLETE LINE OF MAGAZINES 

We Invite Your Patronage 



High Street 



Phone 30 



NEW£ ii\ 
BRIEF. . . . 

Jarvis To Speak At Assembly 

Ml Charles Jarvis, of Eoston, will 
p ta k in assembly next week. 

Mr. Jarvis, who attended the Uni- 
Utity of Maryland and is a graduate 
if American University, is executive 
ccrftaiy of the Board of Christian 
ucation for the Peninsula Confer- 
ee of the Methodist Church. The 
pjc of his speech has not been an- 
iced. 



H 



omecomin 



g Issue 



To Model At Fashion Show 

The following girls, a represenla- 
j v c Ki"up, will model at the Fashion 
;how next Friday night: Sara 

nckwood, Helen Marie Culver, Mary 
jfe Humphreys, Virginia Hoopes, 
r Steele, Frances Kreeger, Betty 
loekhom, Virginia Cooper, Ellen 
ettrs, Ann Rouse, Jean Phillips, 
lory Ann Everngan, Ann Boiling, 
oim Johnston, Joan Connors and 
lice Sutherland. 



"V" 



lne 




ELmIH 



"V" 



Vol. XLI. No. 5. WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941 Price Five CenU 



Balch Calls Lee 
Prideless Caesar 
In Chapel Talk 

Assembly Speaker Compares 

Lee With Other Great 

Military Heroes 



Pajama Parade, Bonfire, Game, Dances 
Promise Gala Homecoming Week-End 



College Needs New Cheers 

After the Assembly, yesterday 
end Cheer Leader Patterson urged 
io members of the student body to 
■vise some new cheers for Satur- 
gome. He then demonstrated 
Red Hot" yell which had been 
ked out by the cheer leaders, 



■: 



ooks Discussed By Mt. Vernon 

The Mount Vernon Literary Socie- 
held its first meeting of the yeai 
csday evening. 

Hort Garrison, president of the so^ 
Sty, conducted a discussion on books 
ad during the summer. At the 
cxt meeting, a Board of Curator 
111 bo elected, who will plan the eel 
bration for the 95th anniversary of 
ho society. The group hopes tc 
e Dr. Ford speak at the next meet- 



New Books In Library 

In keeping with the talk about Na- 
onal Defense, the Library has pur- 
sed a few books on the subject, 
wig the week's new books are; 
England's Hour by Vera Brittian. 
Prepare For Peace by Henry M. 
riston. 

More on the informative side, the 
Tory is adding some books of sta- 
tics and other reference works. 
Youth Tell Their Story by Howard 
I. Bell. 
The 1940 Federal Census. 
Decorative Art. 

Special Notices 

The Administration regrets that 
is year it can not invite visiting 
umni to join with us at Homecom- 
g and help fill our Dining Room in 
o'ison Hall. 

We are normally running at about 
nil capacity with the largest group 
f boarding students in the history of 
ie College. This leaves us without 
'Dm to provide meals for others. 



"Robert E. Lee — an Alexander 
without tyranny, a Caesar without 
pride, a Napoleon without ambition 
and a Washington without reward." 

This was the description given by 
Herbert H. Balch, prominent member 
of the Maryland bar, at assembly yes- 
terday where he spoke on "The Life 
of Robert E. Lee." 

From his childhood on, Robert E. 
Lee manifested those traits that mark 
the great, Mr. Balch stated. After 
Lee's illustrious father had ruined the 
family wealth by his gambling pro- 
pnesities, he and his mother were com- 
pelled to move to Alexandria. Here 
the boy first showed his manly qual- 
ities; he became devoted to his moth- 
er, and served her faithfully all the 
time they lived in Alexandria. 

Brilliant Scholar At West Point 

When he had completed his pre- 
liminary education, it was decided 
that he should go to West Point, to 
which institution he was appointed by 
the influence of John C. Calhoun. 
Here he received marks so high that 
"it dazzled one's eyes to read them", 
and he graduated second in the class. 

His first service after graduation 
was in the engineers, doing bridge- 
building in the mid-west. When the 
Mexican War started, he, along with 
officers destined to fight him later, 
was sent to the battle front. It was 
here that he first met Grant. 

His marvelous self-control was 
shown when, after the Mexican War, 
the newspapers attacked him. Lee, 
however, calmly ignored them, and 
didn't attempt n reply. 

In the meanwhile, Lee took 
the management of Arlington 
wife's estate. The evev-growing dis- 
content between the North and South 
(Continued on Page 6) 



okstore hours have been an- 
ounced by Mrs. Jones. The store 
'" be open from 10 to 12 A. M. and 
to 5 P. M. 

The store will keep longer hours 
1^'n the second semester begins and 
'* rush to get new books is on. 



Reserve books may NOT be taken 
t of the library except for over- 
cht use or use over the week-end. 
Wing the day reserve books must 
! used in the library. Exceptions 
this rule may apply to student 
Miers, who must ask Mr. Coleman 
r Mrs. Jones for permission to take 
ut the reserve books before the of- 
ci al time. 

Reserve books may be taken out at 
* -M. for overnight use and at noon 
n Saturday for use over the week- 
nd. 



Your Letters Are Needed Now 

To Pass Longer Amendment 

Below is a copy of a letter sent to the Senate Committee on Military 
Affairs by the Editor of The ELM. Every alumnus' and student of the Col 
lege is urged to write now in support of the Langer Amendment. 



over 
, his 



Gym Required 
Of Frosh, Sophs 

Gym Seen As Direct Benefit To 
Prospective Draftees 



Elm, Paca Shop Will Display 

Latest Styles On Friday Night 



Physical Education Director, J. 
Thomas Kibler, announced this week, 
that all Freshmen and Sophomores, 
whether they are participating in an 
intra-mural sport or not, will be com- 
pelled to attend all gym classes. Only 
the members of the varsity squads 
will be excused. Upper-classmen, al- 
though not compelled, will also be 
asked to participate in these classes. 
An Advantage To Draftees 

Coach Kibler said, "Most of the 
boys are soft and we're doing this to 
help them when they get in the army. 
It will be both an advantage to them 
and to the army." The coach, an 
army man himself, realizes that it is 
no place for softees, and feels that 
the boys, especially the upper-class- 
men, should jump at the chance to 
prepare themselves for the training 
that will come eventually to all of 
them. 



The Washington Elm 

WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CHESTERTOWN, MARYLAND 



October 17, 1941 

The Senate Committee on Military Affairs 
The United States Senate 
Washington, D. C. 
Gentlemen: 

We wish to express our approval of the proposed 
Langer Amendment to the Selective Service and Train- 
ing Act of 1940. 

The college undergraduate of the United States in 
general and of Washington College in particular is not 
asking or seeking deferment from what he recognizes 
as his patriotic duty. 

Both the economy of the nation and the morale of 
the United States Army will suffer, however, if college 
men who are twenty-one years of age are abruptly tak- 
en from their studies and put into uniform. The sacri- 
fices that a modern education so often necessitate must 
be considered. 

We are asking only for postponement of induction, 
so that the student draftee may complete his year of 
study. 

Passage of the Langer Amendment will be con- 
vincing proof that you are cognizant of both the aspira- 
tions and the difficulties of the college student, who will 
enter the Army with the best spirit and who will have a 
much better chance of resuming the normal pattern of 
life when this emergency has passed. 

Very sincerely yours, 

J. Calvert Jones, Jr., 

Editor-in-Chief. 



Thirty-Five Outfits Will Be Modeled By Fourteen 
Two Dresses Are Offered As Prizes 



Co-Eds; 



Some thirty-five outfits will be dis- 
played by student models at the Fall 
Fashion Show next Friday night in 
William Smith Hall. 

Some of the outfits have been se- 
lected by style experts and have been 
featured in leading national style 
magazines. 

The Gay Gibson Junior Dress Com- 
pany is giving two dresses away as 
prizes. The models have been se- 
lected and, according to Doris T. 
Bell, who is instructing them, all 
classes, sororities, and the day stu- 
dents will be represented. The show 
is being sponsored by Paca's Dress 
Shop, in cooperation with the ELM. 

The exhibits include clothes for all 
day, ranging from day dresses to 
sport clothes and evening dresses. 

One dress will be given away as a 



door prize; another will be given to 
the person selling the most tickets to 
the show. Both dresses are junior 
dresses, Mrs. Paca stated, and are 
within a collegiate price range. The 
Gay Gibson Junior Dress Company 
has chosen this method of introduc- 
ing its dresses to the collegiate world. 

The fourteen student models have 
been selected by Doris T. Bell, who is 
rehearsing them. There will be tall, 
medium and short models; they will 
range from light blondes to dark 
brunettes, Miss Bell explained. 

The setting of the style show will 
pattern after a studio in a radio 
broadcasting station. Mrs. Paca, 
who has had considerable experience 
as a radio commentator, will do the 
commentation during the show. Suit- 
able music will be furnished by the 
orchestra. 



Hudson, Cummins Orchestras 

To Furnish Music For 

Two Gala Dances 



The football game with Randolph- 
Macon at 2 o'clock tomorrow after- 
noon is but the feature attraction in 
a week-end full of action. Tonight 
a Pep Meeting to be followed by the 
annual Pajama Party will open the 
festivities for Homecoming. To- 
morrow the game will hold the spot- 
light, but tomorrow night two gala 
dances will be held. Intermission 
parties are planned by the fraterni- 
ties. 

Pajama Party Tonight 

Following the Pep Meeting tonight, 
the Freshmen boys, dressed in their 
pajamas, will march around town giv- 
ing cheers and singing songs until 
they finally reach the field below the 
gridiron, where the bonfire will be 
held. All week, the Freshmen — un- 
der the supervision of the Sopho- 
mores — have been gathering lumber 
for the occasion. 

Sho'men Out For Revenge 

Randolph-Macon, victors over the 
Sho'men last year, will be the foe in 
the game tomorrow. Out to avenge 
last season's 13 to 7 defeat, the team 
has been working hard all week to 
remedy the defects in timing which 
caused numerous penalties in the 
Hopkins game last Saturday. 

Two Dances Tomorrow Night 

At 8 o'clock tomorrow night, the 
Varsity Club will hold their annual 
Homecoming dance in the Cain Gym- 
nasium, featuring Joe Hudson and his 
Orchestra, from Wilmington. The 
hop is expected to close at 11:45. 

Bob Cummins and his Band, also 
from Wilmington, will play at the 
Alumni Dance to be held at the Ches- 
ter River Yacht and Country Club 
from 9 to 1. 

Fraternities Plan Partie* 

The fraternities and sororities ex- 
pect large numbers of their graduate 
brothers and sisters to visit the cam- 
pus for the festivities. Kappa Alpha 
and Theta Chi will both hold their in- 
termission parties at the Voshell 
House. As yet Lambda Chi has made 
no definite plans for an intermission 
party, but will hold a banquet at the 
Chestertown Restaurant at 6 o'clock 
tomorrow evening. 



Engagement Announced 

Mrs. John Waters Russell of this 
city announces the engagement of her 
daughter, Miss Charlotte Redue Rus- 
sell, to Mr. Laurence Edwin McCal- 
ley, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Laurence 
Edwin McCalley, of Baltimore. Both 
Miss Russell and Mr. McCalley are 
graduates of Washington College, 
class of 1941. 



Pegasus Notice 

There will be a Pegasus editorial 
staff meeting Wednesday, October 
22 at 4:00 P. M., in the Pegasus of- 
fice. Amateur photographers, art- 
ists, typists, writers, copy readers, 
and anyone else interested in year- 
book production are urged to attend. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON- ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 
OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 
Established 1782 
Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 
Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

John Kardash »...._ Sports Editor 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 

FRID AY, OCTOBER 17, 1941 _____ 

Desk Editor Aycoek 

Assistants P- Peters, Hubbard 



Editor Views Homecoming 

Homecoming, that event that rolls around once every year, 
just like Christmas, is before us again. This year, even more 
than before, we are glad to see so many of the alumni of the col- 
lege back here. In these times, when strained international af- 
fairs are before everyone and all events tend to tear one away 
from the routine events of his life, it is a pleasure to see that so 
many of the former students still realize that they are an inte- 
gral and important part of the College. 

Externally, we are the same here at Washington College, 
but scholastically, athletically, and cooperatively, we have 
made great strides in the past year. Student morale, under 
new leadership, is at an all-time high. New faces have been 
added to our faculty. The football team, with one victory un 
der its belt, shows vast improvement over those of the past sev- 
eral years. A record enrollment, despite the tense foreign sit 
uation, has been made. Student organizations are taking a new 
lease on life and are enlarging the functions and fields. Stir 
dents, faculty, and administration are all making definite steps 
toward building a greater Washington College. 

The Alumni have not been forgotten. We are proud of 
your individual successes and hope that they may continue. We 
have always been glad for the opportunity to say, "He's a grad- 
uate of Washington College." 

Your "place in the sun" is a definite, tangible thing. Your 
cooperation with the administration and students is always de- 
sirable. Talk up Washington College and its many superiori- 
ties. Help get desirable students. Pledge your help to any 
project on which the college may asy your cooperation. Up 
hold your Alma Mater, come what may. And then watch us— 
"Together we go forward." 



-JLLj**l£iJ^ ^& 




B^vms 



Library Too Noisy For Study 

When the Bunting Library was opened to the student body 
about a year and a half ago, everyone appreciated the advan- 
tages it offered for research, study and pleasure. Abuses of 
library rules, both written and unwritten, were few and far be- 
tween. This year has seen a change sweep over the students. 
Giggling, laughing- and talking make the library more of a club 
room than a place for study. What should be the quietest spot 
on the campus is now characterised by a continuous hum and 
hub-bub. 

At first thought it would seem that perhaps the Freshmen 
and other new students who were not aware of conditions be- 
fore the opening of the new library might be responsible for this 
disturbance. However such is not the case. - It is the upper- 
classmen, the old students who remember the former library in 
William Smith Hall, who are chiefly responsible for the noise. 
Naturally the Freshmen, seeing Sophomores, Juniors, and Sen- 
iors talking and laughing, feel that they have a perfect right to 
do likewise. 

The only way to remedy the situation is for the upper- 
classmen to change their ways. If such a change is not volun- 
tary, the librarians will be forced to ban the library privilege to 
all offenders. J. M. A. 



And Where Were Yon 

"Mort" Jones feels that he is in 
line for a medal, since he "hit" two 
yellow sheets in one day . . . Ripley 
might be interested in that. 

Preparatory to the bonfire, "Bill" 
Smith was graced with a cart and a 
lumber sign to the effect "everything 
needed for building" . . . All contri- 
butions accepted, of course! 

When informed that she would be 
seeing a lot of the wall paper in her 
room, Ellen Boik didn't realize that 
was just another phrase for "room 
campus." 

There won't be much left of the 
boys in college if there are many 
more "farewell" and "welcome back" 
parties for the army boys 

Francis Mead, leader of the "Rov- 
ing Troubadours", the new band on 
the campus, feels that there is a great 
future ahead for them and, from 
what we have heard, we think so too. 
What about some "saddle shoe" week- 
end night get-to-gethevs? 

Marlin Storm reappeared Tuesday 
to state that if he didn't get in thei 
army, he might take up ranching on 
a large scale, chickens and all. Jerry 
Sohl is of the opinion that he would 
do a lot more good if they would let 
him stay here the rest of the year. 
We predict a great future for both 
of these boys. 

Many of the students are rejoicing 
that the seating arrangement was 
changed so quickly. What they 
didn't know was that this rapid 
hange came as the result of a re- 
quest (or order) of one fo the effici- 
ent organizations of the campus. 
See you at the Pep Meeting! 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



Chance For More Informals 

The students have often expressed their desire for small 
Saturday night dances. They did not ask for large orchestras 
with expensive decorations, just for an informal hop to last 
few hours. Now there is a chance for such get-togethers. 

For the past two weeks, a dance band has been holdin; 
regular rehearsals on the campus, Francis Mead, leader of the 
group, feels that the orchestra is shaping up well and expressed 
the desire to play at week-end informals. Students who hav/ 
heard the band are enthusiastic in their praise. 

It seems to us that O. D. K. would do well to consider hav- 
ing these boys play at the next informal. If they are satisfac- 
tory, it would be possible to have more and cheaper dances 
This might be the solution to "going in the red" on the O. D. ll 
informals. 




Dear Editor, 

Washington College was indeed 
blessed by the munificent gift of the 
library by Mr. Bunting. As a labra- 
tory of research and study our libr- 
ary is most complete. The architect 
missed nothing in making this one of 
the most beautiful buildings on the 
campus. 

But many of us who use the library 
to a large extent feel that one of the 
most important features was left out! 
It's a mighty long walk to William 
Smith Hall when one wants a drink. 
Those students who study in the lib- 
rary for long periods and also the 
members of the faculty and the stu 
dent assistants who are stationed ir 
the library find it most provoking and 
inconvenient to walk so far for a 
drink. It would be much easier and 
more convenient to have a fountain in 
the hall of the library. 

(Continued on Page 6) 



HOMECOMING 

THE FOURTH FRATERNITY 

THINGS IN GENERAL 

Homecoming, the GLOrious time 
that rolls around just once every 
year, is being celebrated just a little 
earlier this year. The committee in 
charge of the event says that it has 
been planned earlier so that the Sho'- 
men may meet a team that is nearer 
its own strength, thus giving the re- 
turning alumni a good game. The 
factor of weather also enetrs into the 
selection of this date. 

Perhaps getting just a little on the 
gloomy side of the affair and being a 
little sentimental at the same time, 
we say that this Homecoming should 
be one of the greatest ever. With 
the war situation getting closer to u 
each day, it is just possible that thi 
may be the last time some of us will 
ever be able to get together here 
Washington College. The military 
service that will keep many of the 
grads away this week-end is only c 
temporary thing, but what's comini 
later, no one knows. If we could b< 
but sure of what's going to happen 
a month from now or a year fi 
now, perhaps we could all rest a bit 
easier. 

The question of a fourth fraterni 
ty has come very much to the stu- 
dents' interest these past days. 1) 
seems to be worrying the students 
quite a bit but as we see it, there is 
no reason whatsoever for worrying 
Of course, there is no way in the 
world to prevent such a fraternity 
from organizing but there are many 
ways to keep such an organization 
from being recognized. First of all, 
it would have to be recognized by fne 
Administration and Board which is 
highly improbable. Secondly, a pro- 
vision in the rules of the college 
states that only a certain percent of 
the student body can be affiliated with 
a fraternity which means that this 
rule would either have to be changed 
or the other fraternities would have 
to take a cut in membership. Fra- 
ternity men would never stand for 
that. 

Another thing to be considered 
the element of national affiliation, 
hardly seems logical to us that a 
reputable national fraternity woi 
add a chapter that is just in the prim- 
ary stages of development. It cer- 
tainly seems that before national af- 
filiation would be possible, the fra- 
ternity would have to prove that il 
(Continued on Page 6) 



NORTHEAST 
=CORNER 



tverj 

:o|. 



At this season of the year, 
week-end sees somewhere in the i 
legiate world a "Homecoming Day" 
as we are celebrating at Washington 
College this Saturday. Such evenu 
are of relatively recent origin, helped 
along, no doubt, by the incrensej 
ease of travel by automobile, and by 
other more modern devices. In the 
"horse-and-buggy days", such home- 
coming of alumni as ever happened 
usually coincided with Commence- 
ment exercises. Now alumni days in 
some form come both in Spring and 
Fall, and undergraduates get a dou- 
ble opportunity to see and meet their 
predecessors and listen in somewhat 
espectful silence to the tales of oth- 
er days. 

Reasons For Homecoming 

Possibly there was a time when the 
nostalgic urge to see again the sccnei 
of one's youthful adventures was the 
sole great dynamic which accounted 
for such a return. Today is anoth- 
er day, however, and autumn Home- 

fiings are designed to furnish nth- 
er magnetic forces. Football game!, 
fraternity or personal reunions, spec- 
ial college convocations or birthday 
celebrations — all are publicized as the 
real reasons why one should return. 

I somehow suspect, though, that 
these more recent additions are but 
"the outward and visible sign of an 
inner and spiritual yearning" (to bor- 
row without impiety an ecclesiastical 
phrase). When the present under- 
graduate comes back to Homecoming 
in 1951, I venture that no matter how 
he talks about the football game or 
the dance, he will, in his soul, be prim- 
arily motivated by a desire to ex- 
change the gossip of a decade with 
the person who once sat next him in 
Assembly, or who shared with him 
some unscheduled extra-curricular 
activity which skated close to the edgf 
of trouble, if not real academic dis- 
aster. Two boys, or two girls, (ot 
one of each), walking out of William 
Smith Hall at this very moment may 
be talking of something which will 
still be in their common consciousness 
at Homecoming ten years from now, 
or which will lead them to something 
whose ultimate outcome will not even 
then be determined. 

Grads Recall "Old Days" 

It is so everywhere in our academit 
world, I believe. A week ago, on th* 
campus of a large university in an ad- 
joining state, I saw such a combina 
tion Homecoming Day and Birthdaj 
Convocation. The University was 
175 years old, and a colorful aeadem- 
ic pageant marked the celebration 
But it was not different to separate 
in one's mind the returned alumni 
from academic visitors who had com! 
to see and be part of the show. Tr» 
ones who vanished quickly to trains 
or.motor cars when the exercises core 
eluded were certainly the visitors 
The pageant was concluded; the hoi) 
ovary degrees had been conferred up 
on the notables summoned for thtf 
purpose, and all was over. But fo' 
the rest, the real time was just bt 
ginning. The ones who lingered i' 
groups, who greeted and weve hail« 
by cheery nicknames — these weve tfc< 
ones for whom the day was actuall! 
devised. For them, it would go fsj 
on into the night, until the games "' 
a generation ago had been replayed 
the peculiarities of the professors h» ! 
been recalled, the toll of time and C& 
cumstances on a host of friends ha 
been checked, and college days ha 
been completely relived once again- 

The undergraduate, usually into; 
erant of alumni reminiscences, an 
usually hiding beneath an assume 
crust a real admiration for succor 
ful oldsters, can be tolerant of t fc 
(Continued on Page 6) 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Sorority 
Statistics 

Alpha Chi Omega 

Founded: 

DcPauw University, Greencastle, 
idianflj October 15, 1885. 

purpose: 

The advancement of the intellec- 

al, social and moral culture of the 
embers, and in addition to these 
j,.i: -, included the furtherance of a 
iltivation of the fine arts. 

Expenses: 

Pledge fee— $5.00. 

2, Pledge dues — $1.00 . 

3, Initiation fee — $40.00. 
Includes: 

1, Life subscription to the 
,yrc". 

2, Standard badge set in pearls. 

3, Bound volume of the history. 
Song book. 

4, Active dues per month — §3.00. 

5, Grand total expenses for the 
st year— $60.00. 



Fraternity — Sorority Directory 



"IVhat My Sorority Means To Me" 



Alpha Omicron Pi 



Alpha Chi Omega 



Zeta Tau Alpha 



Zeta Tau Alpha 
Founded: 

Virginia State Normal School 
rmville, Va., October 15, 1898. 
Purpose: 

The intensifying of friendship, the 
storing of the spirit of love, the 
cnting of such sentiments, the per 
ing of such deeds, and the mould- 
g of such opinions as will conduce 
the building up of a nobler and 
rer womanhood. 
Expenses : 

Pledge fee — $5.00. 
Pledge dues per month — $.75. 
Initiation fee — $40.00. 
Includes: 

Life subscription to "Themis". 

Plain badge. 
3, Two bound volumes of ZTA 
story. 
National dues, not payable first 

-$5.00. 
Active dues — $2.25. 
Annual Scholarship Fund — $1.00. 
Approximate cost first year — 
5.75. 



Alpha Omicron Pi 

National President: Margaret Ras- 
Isen, 

Pounded: Barnard College, Colum- 
University, New York City, Jan- 
ry 2, 1897. 

ipose: To encourage a spirit of 
iiiity and love among its mem- 
to stand at all times for char- 
ter, dignity, and scholarship; to 
for and support the best inter- 
ts of the college; and in no way to 
[regard, injure or sacrifice those in- 
fests for the sake of the prestige or 

ement of the fraternity. 
Expenses: 

1. Pledge fee — $5.00. 
Pledge dues— .75. 
Initiation fee* — $30.00. 
■i. Plain badge — $9.00. 

Active chapter dues (per 
Onth) — $3.00. 

C. National Council dues — $10.00. 
(Payable by the first of November 
*11 actives). 

■ Approximate cost for a year hi- 
ding initiation — $60.00. 



fith The- 



Greeks 



Kappa Alpha 
Visiting Beta Omega last week-end 
j« Brothers Fetter, Quillen, Selby, 
l( i Copple. 

A large number of alumni are ex- 
ited back for this week-end's fes- 
fitics. Practically all of last year's 
aduatcs have informed us of their 
delations of returning for the 
onieeoming Dance and the Inter- 
ission Party at the Voshell House. 




Lambda Chi Alpha 
Epsilon Theta Chapter of Lambda 



Membership in Alpha Omicron P: 
means to me primarily a comradeship 
that shall enrich my whole life, teach- 
ing me loyalty and service. It is a 
union, not only with my contempor- 
aries, but also with many who pre- 
ceeded and will follow me, with whom 
I have in common the fraternity's 
high and fine implications. I shall 
never be alone. My sisters with 
whom I am brought into close associ- 
ation are my own kind. My honor 
and ideals are theirs also. 

I have learned the meaning of com- 
promise and co-operation without sac- 
rificing individuality. I consider my- 
self a small part of a complete unit. 
I may state my ideas honestly, be- 
cause I have accepted gracefully those 
of others. 

Responsibility has helped me to 
achieve poise and dignity. It has 
been necessary for me to look at a 
situation without predjudice and to 
judge with fairness. I have discov- 
ered latent ability in myself — ability 
encouraged by the trust of others. I 
have learned to value sincerity and to 
differentiate between affection and 
intrinsic worth. 

The Sorority has not only been of 
social consequence, but has given me 
a deeper comprehension of how to be 
of service to others. 

Not all of this is accomplished im- 
mediately, but through gradual ad- 
justment, By working towards the 
fulfillment of its principles I have 
found my place as part of an organ- 
ization. 

In writing this I speak not only for 
myself but for every member of Al- 
pha Omicron Pi. 



What does sorority mean to me? 
Alpha Chi Omega means, first of all, 
the pleasure and genuine satisfaction 
of working with a group of girls who 
are congenial and are aiming for the 
same high ideals. 

It means loyalty and sincere friend- 
ship, which is lasting, because of a 
common interest. 

The sorority teaches better under- 
standing of human nature, in that all 
girls are not alike and you must be 
considerate of another's feeling. 

It means working as a group for 
the good of the sorority and for the 
benefit to its members, and not for 
your own selfish interests. 

It gradually nurtures one in re- 
sponsibility, originality and initiative. 
It means working with girls all over 
the country to try to raise the ideals 
of college women. 

I not only enjoy the friendship of 
the present girls in the chapter, but it, 
calls for closer friendship with the 
girls who have graduated. It is an 
entre for friendship with girls of oth- 
er sororities; for basically, they have 
the same ideals and problems. 

It is hard to express exactly what 
it does mean, but it has the power of 
making a girl devote much of her 
time in hard work, sacrifice, and even 
unpleasant tasks, without asking the 
reason why! I consider it one of the 
highest honors that can be obtained 
in college to be a member of one of 
the best national sororities in the 
country. 



Being a member of Zeta Tau Alpha 
means everything in the world to 
— it has from the day I was pledged. 
Perhaps I might even say before then, 
because I wanted to go Zeta, and I 
could hardly wait to be a part of this 
international fraternity. There is an 
m die crib. able thrill in realizing that 
there are girls all over the United 
States and in Canada whom I can call 
my sisters. When I meet them I feel 
as if I had known them all my life for 
we have both taken the vows of Zeta 
Tau Alpha which are a stronger bond 
than a lifelong friendship. 

Being a Zeta, I feel that I have 
something in common with other sor- 
ority girls, for we are members of the 
National Pan-Hellenic Congress whose 
creed and ideals we believe in and up- 
hold. Our own Pan-Hellenic Council 
has taught me how to cooperate and 
compromise. 

Real friends are hard to find, but I 
found them when I met and later 
joined the Z. T. A.'s. I feel as if I 
shall never be able to repay Zeta for 
the sincere and life-long friends she 
has given me. We have had a lot of 
fun and good times (together that I 
shall never forget. 

Naturally I'm prejudiced, but I 
think Zeta Tau Alpha is "tops" in ev- 
erything, and I'm sincerely proud to 
be in the position to which they have 
entrusted me. I'll be forever grate- 
ful for the benefits Zeta has given me, 
for every day I realize how much it 
means to be a, part of such a wonder- 
ful fraternity. 



Chi Alpha initiated seven men last 
Sunday evening. They were: Thomas 
Eliason, '42, Laurence Brice, '42, 
Francis Taylor, '43, and Michael Al- 
tei'i, -Limes Emich, Theodore Kurze, 
and Robert Ruff, members of the 
class of '44, 

Visitors to the House over the past 
week-end included Alvin Coleman, 
'39, and Albert Wharton, '41, who is 
now studying on a fellowship at the 
University of Boston. 

The annual Home-coming banquet 
for the alumni, faculty members and 
pledges of Epsilon-Theta Chapter is 
being held at the Chestertown Res- 
taurant, Saturday evening. Austin 
Murphy is in charge of arrangements. 



Theta Chi 
Beta Eta Chapter of Theta Chi 



initiated Edgar Wood, '42, Harry M. 
Slade, Jr., '43, Frank Gibe, Jr., '44, 
and Gilbert Conant, Jr., '44, last Sat- 
urday, October 11. 

On Monday, Theta Chi pledged 
Marty Warther, '43, Bob Thawley, 
'43, and Frank Evans, '44. After 
this a farewell party was given for 
Brother Nelson "Jerry" Sohl, '42, 
who has been drafted to Uncle Sam. 

Plans are being made for a bigger 
and better Home-coming and many 
of the old boys are expected to re- 
turn. 



Alpha Chi Omega 
Ann Turner, '41, has invited the 
Alpha Chi Omega Fraternity to an in- 
termission party tomorrow night at 
her home. She is returning from 
New England for Homecoming. 



All Alpha Chi's wore their colors in 
celebration of the 56th anniversary 
of the fraternities founding. 



Zeta Tau Alpha 

Zeta Tau Alpha held its traditional 
Founder's Day ceremony in the sor- 
ority room on Wednesday evening, 
October 15th marked the 43rd anni- 
versary of the founding of Zeta Tau 
Alpha as a national fraternity. 

Charlotte Russell, President of 
Gamma Beta '40-'41 has just become 
engaged to Laurence McCalley, bet- 
ter known as Eddie. Both were of 
the class of '41. The engagement is 
to be announced formally in the near 
future. 



Alpha Omicron Pi 
On Tuesday evening, October 7th, 



Alpha Omicron Pi gave their first for- 
mal rush party of the season, to 
which twenty Freshmen girls were in- 
vited. The girls were entertained by 
an original play which gave a concep- 
tion of "A Bachelor's Dream". Mil- 
dred Powers sang and played the 
piano while refreshments, the A. O. 
Pi salad, hot rolls, and iced tea were 
served. 

Miss Doris Hebditch, class of 1940, 
visited the campus over the week-end. 



FORD and MERCURY 
Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



J Usilton's 

s Funeral Home, Inc. $ 

5 Phone 72 High St. J 

: :SN\WV\\ ViXWWNNNWVNNSK 



Stime's 
Orvis 
Shop 

The Friendly 
Store 



FOR GOOD, CLEAN 
COAL— 
See— 



Kibler's 

Coal Co. 



Distributors Of The 
Famous "Blue Coal" 



PACE FOB* 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941 




Pictured above reading from left to right are Lew 
Verkes, quarterback; Al Dudderar, center; and "Bull" 
Jlessick, halfback. These three men, each of whom 
will start in tomorrow's game, were instrumental in the 
6-0 defeat of Hopkins last week. Dudderar, a senior, 
is Washington College's candidate for the All-Mary- 
land eleven this year. 



Lew Yerkes, who scored against Hopkins last 
week, and Messick, alternate in the ball carrying. Both 
boys handle the Sho'men's passing, while Yerkes is call- 
ed upon to do almost all the kicking. Both men re- 
ceived their letters last year. Yerkes is a Sophomore 
and Messick is a Junior. Pictures Courtesy Baltimore SHU, 



Sho'men Groomed To Set Back 

Randolph - Macon In 2nd Tilt 



by John Kardash, Sports Editor 
The Sho'men will seek victory num- 
ber two when they encounter the 
"Lemon and Black" eleven from Ran- 
dolph-Macon. To date, the Yellow 
Jackets from Ashland, Virginia, have 
suffered four consecutive defeats at 
the hands of William and Mary {51- 
6), Richmond (26-0), Florida (24-0) 
and Apprentice Hall (20-0). Despite 
its losses, under the hands of Coach 
Frank L. Summers, Randolph-Macon 
invades Kibler Field with an aggrega- 
tion which the Ekaitismen, if they in- 
tend to remain undefeated, will have 
to better their initial appearance. 

Tomorrow, the Yellow Jackets in- 
tend to start two Freshmen, Talerico, 
left end, and Lydia, at center. In 
Kovar, at fullback, and Bentley, sig- 
nal barker, the Jackets possess two 
fine passers. The receiver of the 
Jacket passes is Moberg, right end, 
who is reputed to be a fine offensive 
end. Jackson, left tackle, who play- 
ed a bang-up game against the Sho'- 
men last year, is another capable vet- 
eran in the visitor's lineup. Isen- 
berg, a transfer student, is slated to 
start at the left halfback position. 
Visitor* Possess Speed In Lovett 
In John Lovett, 170-pound, red- 
haired back, the Jackets have a speed 
merchant deluxe. Lovett, in the 
Mason-Dixon track meet last year, 
traveled the 100 yard dash in the 
time of 9.6 seconds. Harrison is to 
start at the right halfback position. 

The Maroon and Black lineup has 
two changes in it. Benjamin snd 
Loll at the ends; Sinclair and Reidy, 
tackles; Kirby and Gibe, who replaces 
Dougherty, guards; and Dudderar at 
center. In the backfie,!d, Juliana, 
replaces Jackson, and Macielag are 
the halfbacks; Messick is iA the full- 
back slot; and Lew Yerkes, field gen- 
eral, is the quarterback. 



Toi 

Randolph-I 


norrow's Lin* 


up 

Vashington 


Iacon 


T 


Talerico 




LE 


Benjamin 


Jackson 




LT 


Sinclair 


Derowski 




LG 


Kirby 


Lydia 




C 


Dudderar 


Sessa 




RG 


Gibe 


Reilly 




RT 


Reidy 


Moberg 




RE 


Loll 


Bentley 




QB 


Yerkes 


Isenberg 




LH 


Messick 


Harrison 




RH 


Juliana 


Kovar 




FB 


Macielag 




Pre 


dictions 





Sho'men Win 
Opener, 6-0 
Over Hopkins 



Navy 13, Cornell. 6. 
Western Md. 6, Gettysburg 0. 
Johns Hopkins 6, American U. 
Mt. St. Mary's 6, LaSalle 19. 
Maryland 7. Florida 13. 
Washington 13, Rand.-Mae. 7. 



D 



NOD OF THE WEEK 



In what was the opening game of 
the season for both teams, Washing- 
ton College defeated Johns Hopkins 
6 to on Kibler Field last Saturday 

During the first half, Lew Yerkes 
punts kept the Blue Jays deep in theii 
own territory. However, in the third 
quarter, the Sho'men gave a brief dis- 
play of their expected offensive pow- 
er and drove 40 yards to score. Yer 
kes and Messick carried the ball down 
the field, with the former buckini 
over from the 1-yard line. 

Defensively, the Sho'men appeared 
powerful. Hopkins actually lost 



more ground from scrimmage than 
they gained and made only one first 
down to 14 for Washington. Numer- 
ous penalties nullified gains by the 
backs. 

Messick, Yerkes, and Juliana spark- 



ed the Sho'men offense; while Reidy, 
Macielag, and Kirby starred defen- 
sively. 



Prediction — I betcha the Sho'men 
take a close one over the Jackets. 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
— For— 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



The "Nod" for outstanding athletic, 
performance, goes this week to little 
Jimmy Juliana, 130-pound back at 
Washington College, Juliana was th<^ 
real luminary of the Washington-Hop- 
kins game here on Saturday. 

His work on returning punts, while 
in at safety for the Shoremen, was 
little short of sensational. He also 
ran the ball well from scrimmage, 
caught a forward for a 25-yard gain, 
ntereepted a Hopkins pass and de- 
fended flawlessly from the safety 
ipot. 

Juliana, a sophomore, in spite of 
his lack of poundage, is sure to see 
plenty of action for Washington this 
son. Slightly built he, neverthe- 
less, is tough and hard to hurt. Above 
all else he likes the game and the 
rougher the going the more at home 
he is. 

The "nod" is deservedly his. 



Meet Your Class Mates 

—at — 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



A. S. TURNER & SONS 

The Firestone Store 

—SPORTING GOODS— 

Tennis Racquets, Tennis Balls, Footballs, Basketballs, 

Flashlight Batteries, Electric Light Bulbs 

FILL UP WITH GOOD GULF GASOLINE HERE 

High Street 



Sidelines 

Believe it or not, the Sho'men garn- 
ered first downs when Hopkins was in 
possession of the ball! Slip-up some- 
where. Blue Jays- 



D O R F ' S 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 

High Street 



The Transcript 

Chestertown, Maryland 



Photographic and Engraving Department 



No Job Too Large 
No Job Too Small 



Neat Printing Our Specialty 

Dance Programs, Tickets, Placards, Etc 



Complete Coverage Of News 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



Replaces Dougherty In Lineup 




Frank Summers, coach at Ran. 
'Inlph-Macon College, which meets 
Washington here in the Homecoming 
Day game Saturday, was in the 
stands last week here for the Wash- 
ington-Hopkins tilt. His chib was 
idle for the day and he took over tht 
.scouting duties himself. 



A SPOT # 

• OR TWO 

• • • 
OF SPORTS 



Uncle Sam struck out at the Shore- 
men this week and grabbed Marliii 
Storm, big senior tackle, in the draft. 
Storm, who played about half of the 
Hopkins game on Saturday, left Tues- 
day for Baltimore, his home, to leave 
for service. Another Washingtonian, 
Lefty Addis Copple, who was a visi- 
tor here, goes in the Army on Friday. 



Sidelines 



Reidy made a humdinger of a tack- 
le in the final quarter; the Blue Jay 
back was floored for the count — keep 
up the good work, "Abner"! 

Jim Juliana's running was a fine 
display of how to carry the mail — the 
Freshmen girls are at your feet — 
Jewel ! 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 



phone 14 



Pictures Courtesy Baltimore SUN. 
Frank Gibe 



GIRL 'S 
SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



Congratulations to our Big Red 
am on this victory over Hopkins! 
hen we see a game like the football 
sin played last Saturday, it certain- 
is a challenge to the girls. Let's 
» all we can to impart their enthusi- 
m and spirit. 

Probably the season's most enlight- 
ling moment came last week when 
Doris gave the upperclassmen a 
llow sheet on hockey rules. Many 
us found that even after playing 
r several years, specific rules were 
ry vague in our minds. I, for one, 
as amazed to find that there were no 
me-outs in hockey, except in case of 
jury, Such points should be fa- 
jliar to all of us and it is only 
rough quizzes and board work that 
e actually learn them. 
Training rules should be kept by 
ery girl who intends to play in the 
flies which begin in November, 
ey serve a double purpose in mount- 
g up points as well as keeping the 



girls physically fit for strenuous ex 
ercise. They are not extremely 
strict as you will see. 

1. Fifteen minutes complete re- 
laxation a day. 

2. In bed with lights out by 11 P, 
M. 

3 

4. 

5. 

drinks. 

6. At least 4 glasses of water a 
day. 

7. Running from letter-box on hill 
to foot of campus and gradually work- 
ing up to run both ways (or equal 
distance). 

S. One intentional or two unin- 
tentional cuts allowed a week. 



No eating between meals. 

No smoking. 

No beer or other alcoholic 



Some 15,000 Wisconsin high school 
students will be guests of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin at the Badger-Syra- 
cuse football game November 1. 



Big Bill Nicholson is home from 
the baseball wars looking fit and rea- 
dy for the hunting season. Nick was 
far from satisfied with his hitting as 
'hole but reported that even had 
he hit .500 in the final month he prob- 
abl couldn't have driven in a dozen 
runs since the Cubs never had anyone 
on base. He said that he never hit 
the ball better in his life than he did 
in the city series with the White Sox 
but all of his drives were right at an 
opposing player. Nick, like most 
others, thought St. Louis had a bet- 
ter club than Brooklyn. 



Again last Saturday two of Wash- 
ington College's future foes tangled 
and one, Delaware, scored 24-0 tri- 
umph over another, Ursinus. P. M. 
C, Randolph-Macon and Juniata were 
idle while Mt. St. Mary's dropped a 
24-21 decision to Western Maryland. 
Juniata has yet to play a game, the 
season being delayed because of the 
prevalence of infantile paralysis in 
that section. 



HOMECOMING 

Is Not Complete Without 

A Meal 

— at— 

^cllltattcn 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPTMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



All-Marylander 




Ray Kirby 

I Ray Kirby, All-Maryland Guard, 
' be in the starting lineup against 
"dolph-Macon tomorrow. 




Washington College Teams 
Reach Out-Of-Town Contests 

Safely 

Via 
Bee? Star Motor Coaches, Inc. 







When Away From Home 

Why Not Still Enjoy 

A Home-Cooked 

Meal. 

Our prices are reason- 
able, and if the food or 
service is not satisfactory, 
please tell US. 

Open 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. 

Your Patronage 
Appreciated 

KENT 

GRILLE 

CHESTERTOWN 



HADAWAY GROCERY 

Meats and Vegetables 

Phone 37 
Cross Street, Chestertown 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and BuilderG 

Lumber, Mil] Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone S 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



HOMECOMERS— 

Stop at Bill's over the 

week-end and find the 

rest of the crowd — 

they're always there — 



Bill! 
Bennett's 



Dancing and Dining 
Private Booths 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractor* - Builder* 

Phone 305 - 288 — Camput Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



For That Distinctive 

Washington College 

Jewelry 

—Go To— 

Forney s 
Jewelry 



St 



ore 



Next Door To Gill Bros. 



For those little things 
you are always needing 
in your room and for 
dress — 

Stop in at — 

FOX'S 

5c to $1.00 Store 



For this Homecoming 
week-end — the biggest 
of the semester — do your 
best celebrating by drop- 
ping in to see — 

Gill 
Bros. 

Rember — 

Nothing is too good for 
your Homecoming date! 



Senator Balch , 



(Continued from Page 1) 
became more evident as time went on. 
Long before the war between the 
states, Lee had said: "Slavery is a 
moral and political evil." 

With the John Brown issue, the 
growth of the abolitionist forces, and 
the threats toward secession by the 
South, it was apparent that a show- 
down was near. The firing on Fort 
Sumter was the immediate cause of 
the formation of the Confederacy, 
with Jefferson Davis at the head. 
State Versus Country 

Lee was then faced with an im- 
portant decision. He was offered 
the commanding post of the Northern 
forces. Overnight, Lee made up his 
mind. It was a case of Virginia ver- 
sus IT. S. A. But, as Mr. Balch stat- 
ed, since "Virginia was his mother, 
and U. S. A. his wife and sweetheart", 
he decided in favor of his state. 

After Virginia's subsequent seces- 
sion, Lee commanded the Southern 
forces. He soon observed a lack of 
real military knowledge among his 
generals. While they were content 
with being on the defensive, he knew 
the only way a real victory could come 
about would be by an offensive. 

After the War, Lee took over the 
presidency of the then Washington 
College at Lexington, Virginia, where 
he demonstrated his qualities of con- 
siderateness, kindness, and generosi- 
ty. His dying words proved, howev- 
er, that he had the War on his mind, 
especially the mistakes of his diso- 
bedient officers, when in a delirium he 
spoke: "Tell Hill to come up; tell 
Hill he must come up. Strike again." 



Editor's Desk . 



(Continued from Page 2) 
was stable which would take at least 
three or four years. So, in the face 
of the evidence, it hardly seems pos- 
sible that there will be a fourth fra- 
ternity on the Washington College 
Campus for at least several years, if 
then. 

Contrary to the beliefs of many, 
the army has taken two men from 
our midst and there is a great possi- 
bility that it will take more in the 
near future ... In spite of the hard 
work of a very capable cheer-leading 
corp, the Freshmen did not turn out 
to the game Saturday the way it was 
expected to. It seems that it is still 
true that it takes the upperclassmen 
to show what the true Washington 
College spirit is. 

With a welcome to the alumni and 
best wishes for a GLOrious week-end, 
so long and thirty. 



Northeast Corner . 



(Continued from Page 2) 
returned alumni with the reflectior. 
that as he is now, so once were they; 
and as they are now, so he will be be- 
fore many a year has gone. 

In truth, if all history were written. 
it would appear that there never was 
and never will be, a college genera- 
tion equal to one's own. Yet, s 
moment of reflection will show that 
many 'things enjoyed by the student 
of today was first secured for him, 
unwittingly perhaps, by those who 
are now alumni. And this thought 
may deepen and sweeten the welcome 
of the Washington undergraduate of 
1941 to those returned earlier Wash- 
ingtonians who are with us this week- 
end as honored older members of our 
academic family. 

—Gilbert W. Mead. 



The Letter Box , 



(Continued from Page 2) 
This fountain could be a gift of a 
graduating class or classes or one of 
the student service organizations. It 
could be installed with a minimum of 
cost. The library will be more com- 
plete as a place of study and more 
convenient for all with the installa- 
tion of this much needed fountain. 
Sincerely yours, 

A STUDENT. 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

LgSU, S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



MAC'S 



RADIO 



SHOP 



Kent Circle 



*XNNV%SX*VVVXVtNNV\XS*XNV>XVNNNNN%XV%V\VSXNN*XV\\\\v 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., OCT. 20 - 21 - 22 
The Most Romantic Riot Since Eve Gave 
Adam The Applesauce. 

DEANNA DURBIN in 

"IT STARTED WITH EVE" 

With CHARLES LAUGHTON 

and ROBERT CUMMINGS 
Here is DEANNA'S first real Grown-Up 
Hit and it is a picture that you really must 
see. Entertainment PLUS. 

. THUR. - FRI. - SAT., OCT. 23 - 24 - 25 

—BIG DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM— 

A M-G-M All Star Comedy Hit 

"MARRIED BACHELOR" 

— Starring — 

ROBERT YOUNG - RUTH HUSSEY 

— Plus— 

THE DEAD END KIDS 

— and — 
LITTLE TOUGH GUYS 

— in — 

"MOB TOWN" 

The Gas-House Gang Turns The East- 
Side Up-Side Down. 



V\\XX\\\N\\\\\V\\\\\\\\\NN\V\\\\\\\\\\\N\X\\\X\X\\V\ 





Copyright 1941. Licccrf * UiDi Tonca. Co.. 



hesterfield 



for a Definitely MILDER 

COOLER BETTER TASTE 

Smokers everywhere know you can travel o long 
way and never find another cigarette that can match 
Chesterfield for a Milder Cooler Better Taste. 

It's Chesterfield's Right Combination of the world's 
best cigarette tobaccos that wins the approval of 
smokers all over the country, let the Navy's choice be 
your choice . . . make your next pack Chesterfield. 



BVBRYWHBRB YOU GO 



NEW£ in 
gRIEF. . . . 



Allen Is Assembly Speaker 

jlr. Wendell Allen, an alumnus of 

L, college and a prominent attorney 

jf Baltimore, will speak in assembly 

xt week, according to Mr. Goodwin 

A popular speaker on previous as- 

mbly programs, many students 

ihould remember Mr. Allen, The 

onic of his speech has not been an< 

need. 



"V" 




JLMII1. 



"V" 



Roll Call To Be Issued 

For the first time a Red Cross drive 
r,]] be spomsored by the college as a 
M up, stated Mr. William B. Usilton 
oual Red Cross chairman in assembly 
bsterdny. 

A complete canvas will be made of 
ho student body by committees ap- 
lointcd by the leaders of the campus 
ionizations participating in thi 

This drive will begin next 
'hursday and be completed by Satur- 
oy, according to Dean Livingood. 



Werner Will Speak To Y's 

Dr. Werner will be the speaker at 

joint meeting of the Y. W. and the 

M. C. A., to be held Tuesday ev- 

ping in Hodson Hall. His topic will 

'Why C. A.?" 



Sara Blackwood Named 
The Board of Managers met on 
iicsday and voted in Sarah Black- 
ood as an honorary member in ap- 
rcciation of her untiring loyalty and 
irvice to the Board. Days on which 
anie^ will be scheduled were discus- 
id and each member was requested 
i talk it over with members of her 



Council Okays Board 

The Constitution of the Washing- 
cm College Board of Publications 

is submitted for approval and pass- 
after revisions at the Student 
ouncil meeting this week. 

Omar Jackson was appointed at his 
nil request, for the agency of the 
iltege ring after no other applicants 

r this position were submitted. 



ociety Takes In Ten Members 

Ten new members were approved 
y the members of the Classical So- 
fty last week. They were Leaver- 
Graber, Waldman, Eisner, Phil- 
p.', Burrows, Gill, Crew, Horn and 

swell. 

Majorie Starr, elected last spring, 

esided at the meeting. The other 
Rim's elected at the same time were 
leaner White, secretary, and Joan 
ischer, treasurer. 

New Books In Library 

Among the new books which will 
E placed on the shelves this week, 
[ere are to be found more reference 
fnks than novels. However, there 
re several worthy of mention as good 
tference material and good read- 
s' These are as follows: 
The Cambridge Economic History 
"The Agrarian Life of the Middle 
ges. 

In This Our Life by Ellen Glas- 
)w. 

The Arts by Hendrik Vanloon. 
Goya by Charles Poore. 
Ambassador Dodd's Diary by Will. 
t "id Martha Dodd. 

anese Tourist Booklets. 



Pegasus Business Meeting j 

All members of the Junior j 
Class who are interested in 
competing for business mana- 
ger of next year's Pegasus will 
meet in the Pegasus Office at 
12:45 Tuesday. 

Lloyd Davis. 



Vol. XLI. No. 6. WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1941 Price Five Cents 



Theta Chis, Zetas Lead 

First Scholarship Rating 



62 Freshmen, 33 Sophomores, 

23 Juniors, and 13 Seniors 

Make "Dean's List" 



Theta Chi and Zeta Tau Alpha are 
the leaders in this year's competition 
for the scholarship cup, according to 
figures released from the Dean's of- 
fice. The Theta's are on their way 
to winning the cup for the second suc- 
cessive year, and the Zeta's to set an 
all time record of six in a row. 

Sixty-two freshmen, thirty-three 
sophomores, twenty-three juniors, 
and thirteen seniors made the "Dean's 
List," not the one for high index but 
the Honorary Varsity of Dean's call- 
ers. 

Notice was posted to the effect that 
upperclassmen did not have to see the 
Dean, but it was suggested that they 
see their faculty adviser, who inci- 
dentally was sent a copy of the list. 

Out of 19 members of the Theta's, 
three were reported unsatisfactory, 
or 15.7%. In a total of 321 hours 
taken, 16 were reported unsatisfac- 
tory, or 4.9%. 

Out of 24 members of the Lamb- 
da's, six were reported, or a total of 
25% of the fraternity. In a total of 
402 hours taken, 22 were reported 
unsatisfactory, or 5.4%. 

Out of 16 members of the K. A.'s, 
six were reported, or a total of 
37%% of the fraternity. In a total 
of 267 hours taken, 21 were reported 
unsatisfactory, or 7.8%. 

Out of 12 members of the Zeta's, 
one was reported, or a total of 5.3 'A. 
In a total of 203 hours taken, three 
were reported unsatisfactory^ or 
1.4%. 

Out of 14 members of Alpha Chi, 
three were reported, or a total of 
21.4*%. In a total of 223 hours, nine 
were reported unsatisfactory, or 4%'. 

Out of seven members of the A. O. 
Pi's, two were reported, or a total of 
28.5%. In a total of 111 hours taken, 
six were reported unsatisfactory, or 
5.4%. 

Of the 131 students who received 
notices from the Dean, 62 were fresh- 
men. In comparison with past years, 
the freshmen are not setting a new r 
record for scholastic inaptitude. 

One member of Sigma Sigma Omi- 
cron has the distinction of being on 
both the Dean's lists. 



Jarvis Defends 
Conscientious 



'That we can respect the freedom 
of man's conscience and maintain it", 
was one of the main statements of 
Mr. Charles S. Jarvis in assembly yes- 
terday. His topic was "The Position 
of the Conscientious Objectors in a 
War Time Democracy". He was 
pleading for the preservation of free- 
dom and conscience. 

In the last World War provisions 
for the conscientious objectors were 
made in non-combatant jobs under 
military heads. They were even op- 
posed to this and were court-marshal- 
led and humiliated. Conscientious 
objectors will not fight, but they want 
to do some other service for the wel- 
fare of the state. The major prob- 
lem is how to determine the real con- 
scientious objectors and distinguish 
them from the draft-dodgers. 



College Holocaust 

Does Dime Damage 

A small fire in the coal stor- 
age bin of the college heating 
plant late Friday night, October 
17, was put out by the Chester- 
town Volunteer Firemen with- 
out any loss of coal or other 
damage. Mr. Johns, the busi- 
ness manager, called from bed 
by the tender, reported that the 
fire was caused by the spontane- 
ous combustion of coal at the 
bottom of the two hundred and 
fifty ton pile. An empty bar- 
rel and some careboard in the 
bin were set on fire by the hot 
coals. 

According to Mi'. Johns, this 
fire, the second at the heating 
plant in twenty years, caused 
damages amounting to about 
ten cents. Although the local 
fire company extinguished the 
small blaze in a half-hour, its 
activities attracted about three 
hundred onlookers from the 
college and town. 



Co-eds Exhibit Styles 

In Radio Skit Tonight 



Coaches Models 




SSO To Adopt 
Service Policy 

Sigma Sigma Omicron has adopted 
a new policy, that of being primarily 
a service organization. Its aim will 
be to act as tutors for any student de- 
siring help. A "Bull Session" was 
conducted in West Hall before blue- 
book week and as a result became a 
new feature of the SSO. Plans are 
being made for this service to extend 
to Reid Hall. This will continue as 
long as the freshmen so desire for it 
is aimed primarily to help them. 

At the meeting of the society held 
Tuesday night Dr. Davis and Dr. 
Coop were inducted into the circle. 
These faculty men were elected to 
fill the vacancies created by Dr. Mead 
and Dr. Livingood whose terms ex- 
pired with the years '40-'41. 



Coleman Closes 
Library Stacks 

"The Library stacks were closed 
because a few students were using 
that part of the Library for purposes 
other than study and examination of 
books. The stacks should be open to 
the entire student body and I hope 
that the old custom of open stacks 
will be continued in the very near 
future," stated Mr. Coleman in an in- 
terview with an ELM reporter. 

All requests for all books, reserve 
or the general circulating books, 
should be brought to the Loan Desk 
and the assistant on duty will locate 
the material for the students. Spec- 
ial privileges will be granted by M 
Coleman to those students who prove 
that they need to use the stacks for 
serious study. 



Melodramatic Fantasy Will Be 

First Play Of Dramatic Club 

'Smilin' Through" Choice Of Players To Rival "Our Town"; 
Male Talent Sought Among Frosh 



"Smilin' Through" the first play to 
be given by the Washington Players 
this year proves to be a melodramatic 
fantasy from the pen of A. L. Martin. 
This seems to be the only work of Mv. 
Martin but has proved to be very suc- 
cessful both as a play and a motion 
picture. 

Perhaps it will be remembered as 
a successful motion picture starring 
Leslie Howard and Norma Shearer or 
perhaps you have noticed its revival 
as a starring vehicle for Jeanette 
MacDonald. Also it is soon to appear 
at the New Lyceum Theatre. 

While the plot is slightly fantastic 
it is one that has moved even the most 
hardened critics to tears. It is the 
story of a more modern Romeo and 
Juliet, lovers doomed never to marry 
but whose love lasted even after 
death. 

On the wedding night Moonyean is 



shot by the jilted suitor Jeremiah 
Wayne thus bringing down the hatred 
of the Carteret's even to the son who 
never saw the cause of the hatred and 
returned blindly to England and woo- 
ed the niece of Moonyean. Kathleen, 
the niece, manages to hide her love 
for young Kenneth Wayne from her 
uncle but finally he finds out and for- 
bids any more meetings. Because of 
his narrowness he quarrels with his 
lifelong friend and Moonyean fails 
to pay her usual visit on a moonlight 
night as was her custom. However 
Kenneth goes to the wars and returns 
invalided and feeling he can never 
marry Kathleen, goes to enlist the 
help of her uncle Sir John Carteret. 
At last Sir John sees the error of his 
ways and is instrumental in bringing 
the lovers together. Tired, he at last 
goes to Moonyean and because of his 
unselfishness is reunited with her af- 
ter death. 



Three Types Of Clothes To Be 

Exhibited In Elm, Paca 

Fall Fashion Show 



Tonight at seven-thirty William 
Smith Hall will experience something 
different from its usual academic 
activities. Style shows are a novelty 
there even when they arc of the com- 
mon type, and the Elm, Paca style 
show is out of the ordinary, for nev- 
er before has there been co-eds con- 
verted into models. 

This isn't the only novelty howev- 
er for Miss Paca's treatment of the 
show is new to most of us. With the 
co-operation of Miss Doris every-day 
schoolgirl has become a glamorous 
model. The girls chosen for this 
metamorphosis are representatives of 
all the sororities and classes, Minor 
Steele, Virginia Hoopes,' Mary Liz, 
Humphreys, Frances Kreeger, sen- 
iors; Virginia Cooper, Betty Dock- 
born, Helen Marie Culver, Molly 
Blackwood, Juniors; Jean Phillips, 
Laura Rainey, Ann Rouse, Sopho- 
mores; Joan Conners, Ann Boiling, 
Joan Johnston, and Alice Sutherland, 
Freshmen. 

The stage will be converted into 
radio station WELM and the style 
show will be accompanied by a com- 
mentary given by Miss Paca who has 
had experience in this field. Rufus 
Johnson is the radio announcer while 
it appears Lloyd Davis and Jim Stev- 
ens are just there for local color and 
frankly they don't mind one bit. 

The show features three types of 
clothes, afternoon and sport wear, en- 
sembles, and evening dresses. Many 
are creations by Gay Gibson featured 
in "Mademoiselle," 

As an added attraction two dresses 
will be given away, one to the holder 
of the lucky stub and the other to the 
girl who sells the most tickets. 

To be sure this-is something new 
on the campus but should prove to be 
interesting to everybody. Don't stay 
away just because you're a boy and 
don't know anything about girls' 
clothes, don't you want to be enlight- 
ened? 

Come to Bill Smith tonight and see 
your favorite campus beauty model- 
ing with all the poise of a Powers 
model. Look for the surprise! 



Practical Theme 
For Art Exhibit 



The Art Exhibit to be held in the 
Museum Room of the George Avery 
Bunting Library from November 16 
to 19 in connection with National 
Art Week is planning to show college 
students and the generalpublicascon- 
sumers how important art is in their 
every day life, their home, their ap- 
pearance, their business, and their 
leisure. 

According to Dr. Dole many stu- 
dents are artists in their own way. 
You may have a hobby — model boat 
or airplane designing and making, 
clay modeling, dress designing, wood 
carving, leather work, metal work — 
anything that takes creative work on 
your part and the result is pleasing 
to the eye, is a phase of art. 

The local committee asks that you 
be an appreciative spectator at the 
exhibition even if you have nothing 
to contribute. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 
OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 
Established 1782 
Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 
Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Eufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



Member 

Associated Gollefjiate Press 

Distributor of 

CoIle6iale Di6est_ 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 
4ZO Madison Ave. New York. N. Y 

CHICAGO ' BOlIOn • LOS AffCILtS ' StK FBARCIICO 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1941 



Desk Editor p - Peter 

Assistants Hubbard, Pai-ris 



The Stacks Are Closed 

When the Bunting Library was dedicated in 1940, one of its 
main features was that its stacks would be open to the students 
as well as the faculty. Washington College was quite proud 
that it had one of the few libraries in the country that gave open 
stack privileges to its students. 

Last week, with apparently no explanation, the stacks 
were closed to the students. A privilege that students had ap 
predated was taken away from them. 

Need the blame be placed on the students for irresponsibil 
ity, or may it not be that the library staff should undertake 
more careful instruction in the use of the stacks? It seems to us, 
this is a matter the Student Council might look into. 



Do Your Part Today 





is Enjoyed every afternoon 
t* "we students and faculty 
of augostaha college those 
funny words mean rolls. rusks, 
and coffee on the table. 
The spread is open to all students, 
and The total cost is what you put 
your hand on first when you reach 
in your pocket/ 





EDITOR'S 
DESK 



Always after a big event such as 
Homecoming, news is scarce and this 
week is no exception. Of course, in- 
tense sorority rushing is reaching it*, 
climax today if you care to call that 
news but news is usually something 
different. Sorority rushing is sorori- 
ty rushing and it will never be chang- 
Last week, the ELM carried a letter written by the editor ed. There are always the usual par- 
to the Senate Committee on Military Affairs, urging the immed-jties, sweet smiles, catty remarks, 
iate passage of the Langer Amendment to the Selective Service jhairpulling and nail digging. After 
and Training Act of 1940. A caption to the published letter this week-end, the Freshmen will be 
asked every member of the Student Body and the alumni to fol- able to see what the upperclass girl 
low the example. really look like. 

Manv members of the faculty and the student body have . 

- i- , i j.i j. j.i i i j -iJ, 4.1- 1*.+ T+ :„ But, not only the girls are rushing 

indicated that they have already written these letters. It is ' B f Fres h me , 

the hope of the editor that more of the students will realize the ven ° ug some ° e 

I boys don t realize it, they are being 
i swept off their feet. Washington 
College is seeing the longest and 
most intense fraternity rushing per- 
iod that it has ever witnessed. Even 
the fourth fraternity is in the field. 
And speaking of fraternities and sor- 
orities reminds us that there is a plan 
afoot now to combine the inter-fra- 
ternity and inter-sorority hops for the 
sake of a larger orchestra. The plan 
sounds good to us. 



importance of this amendment to .the college undergraduates. 
Had this amendment been passed several weeks ago, Marlin 
Storm and Nelson Sohl would not have had to go in the army un- 
til June. If it is passed within the next feew weeks, Jim Stev- 
ens, Phil Souder, Wilson Reidy, and Ray Kirby, to name a few, 
will not have to go. 

If you would like to see postponement of induction until 
the end of the college year for the college undergraduate, do 
your part today by writing a letter to the Senate Committee on 
Military Affairs giving your support to the Langer Amendment 
to the Selective Service and Training Act of 1940. 



Where 
Were You? 



Style Show Tonight 

A style show, sponsored by the ELM in conjunction with 
the Paca Dress Shop of Chestertown, will be held in the audi 
torium of William Smith Hall this evening. The very latest in 
fashions will be exhibited by the coeds of the Campus. 

Such a style show is really of slight monetary value to the 
ELM. However, it is felt that there is a serious need for some 
organization to sponsor such services for the pleasure and en- 
tertainment of the student body. 

If student support shows that the students appreciate these 
little services, the ELM will attempt to have more of a varied 
nature. Thus, to aid us in being a better newspaper, give us 
suggestions and then support us when we carry them out. 



Competitions To Be Non-Partison 

The first competition to be held under the new constitution 
of the Board of Student Publications will be for members of the 
junior class interested in becoming business manager of The 
Pegasus, it is announced elsewhere in this issue. 

According to this new constitution, the competition is to be 
non-partisan. In short, the best man or woman is to be chosen 
for the position regardless of fraternal affiliation or lack of it 

Such an attempt may seem hopelessly idealistic. But it is 
the opinion of Lloyd Davis, business manager of The Pegasus, 
that a truly objective, impartial system has been devised. 

We wish to express our hearty approval. 



We see that the open stacks, for 
which the Bunting Library was not- 
ed, are now closed, temporarily, al- 
though there is no indication when 
they will be opened again. It certain- 
ly works a hardship on the students 
when they have received a year's 
training in how to use open stacks 
id then have to go through all the 
d tape connected with getting a 
book out of closed stacks. This 
seems to be the giounds for another 
gripe that is fast arising. 

Visitors to the campus this week- 
d were numerous and some of them 
didn't seem to want to leave. How- 
r, they all seemed to enjoy their 
stay here and everybody is happier, 
we guess. One fraternity had the 
novel (?) idea of having a cow exhib- 
ited on its front lawn connected with 
a plug for a victory for the Sho'men. 

The ELM in cooperation with the 
Paca Dress Shop is sponsoring a style 
show in the auditorium of Bill Smith 
this evening at 7:45 and we promise 
a full evening of entertainment for 
everyone who goes — so be there. So 
long and thirty. 



EIroy Boyer informed Bennett's 
and everyone in general that if he 
had a hundred thousand dollars, he 
would buy slot machines, 'cause 
there's money in them. Or is there 
. . . Reid Hall was barricaded last 
Thursday Night — a pretty big door 
knocker I should say . . . Quite a few 
of the Seniors were pleased and sui 
prised at their I. Q.'s. Some wer 
just surprised . . . The intermission 
parties down at the Voshel House 
during the Homecoming Dance were 
a very united affair. Good will was 
flowing freely. 

Join The Red Cross 

Liz should take some lessons 
sailing from Dr. Werner and Profes- 
sor Solandt. She capsized. They 
went sailing . . . The freshmen i 
feel that their privacy has been 
vaded by mice. You never know 
where you'll see them — under cov 
or studying over your shoulder. Free 
education is a good thing but not 
when it's carried that far . . . The 
marriage of Ann Turner and Ralph 
Emmord came as a complete surprise 
to everyone, but though we're late, 
we send them our best wishes. 

Join The Red Cross 

We hear rumors that there is anoth- 
er engagement pending on the cam- 
pus, but we ain't a sayin' nothin' . . 
Sunny Evans would like to play mar- 
bles. He has quite a supply right 
now . . . "Baby" Miles like three- 
wheeled bikes, now, cause they're sai 
er, but not for pedestrians. 

Join The Red Cross 

What are Dian Hubbard and "Ace : 
Martin shaking hands about? . . . We 
hear that Jim Diocumakos is planning 
an extra-active program for the sci- 
entists . . . And that isn't local talent 
on the college smoke stack, nor are 
they repairing any damage caused by 
our pip-squeak fire. We hear there's 
a national — maybe international — 
company of chimney repairers doing 
the job. 

Join The Red Cross 

Mr. Jimmy and Professor Goodwin 
hit the jackpot one day last week 
when they were out with a party af- 
ter rock. Fifteen fish caught in one 
hour weighed 113 pounds . . . Why 
not drop a few of those slot machine 
nickels in the kitty for the Red Cross 
. . . Lovely bon fire, boys. 



Anobium Isn't Thirsty 

Dear Ptinus brunneus: 

Your very entertaining lette. 
hould have been answered weefe 
ago. Pray forgive me for being s 
late. 

The last issue of the Washingtoi 
ELM, which is the student paper hew 
contained much in the way of ne« 
about the College Library. The Ttet 
I thought would interest you was | 
letter to the editor from a student wk 
complained that the beautiful 
Library building had no dviukic 
fountain. This student claimed ths 
a drinking fountain would be < 
the most important features of tb 
Library! The letter closed with tfc 
plea that some Moses bring fortj 
water out of a rock lest the fail 
gins and young men faint for thirsi 
(Aside: When these poor and need 
students seek water, and there 
none, it cannot be said that their toe 
gues faileth for thirst). 

No drinking fountain, indeed! 
intelligent student would complai 
the Library had no books. Such 
t the condition here where the wal 
of the Reading Room are lined i 
cases of books and the stacks 
basement are fairly bursting with I 
erally miles of shelving filled 
books, magazines, documents, 
Yet the aforesaid letter-writing sti 
dent complained because then 
drinking fountain. He has not leai 

d that his College Library is, 
sense, the Pierian spring from whit 
he should drink deep. By so drfol 
ing, this student might have disco 
ered the great Bacon who once wrol 
Seek ye first the good things of ti 
mind, and the rest will either be si 
plied or its loss will not be felt." 

Does your library, my dear Ptim 
have a drinking fountain? 
among your good books have you d 
voured lately? Do let me hear fro 
you again. 



-I 



Your ever faithful friend, 

Anobium paniceum, 

Join The Red Cross 

Here's Our College Spirit 

The following anonymous lett 
was received by the editor of 
ELM on Wednesday. 



Dear Editor: 

As a faithful reader of the ELM 
would like to pick up the ELM so: 
week without the picture of Ray K 
by in it. 

I'll admit that to you he is Ki 
but I believe that after fc 



weeks of the ELM, I have seen K 
by's picture to often. 

I have also failed to see mentii 
ed other members of the squad— £ 
tor Jones I also think your paf 
stinks. How about some news abf 
other members of Washington C 
lege — to me it seems as if the K. i 
runs the damn paper — does it 

In case you failed to see last J 
ture of Kirby it has been inserted 

If you would like to know the i 
thors of this letter please say so* 
thing to its effect in your column! 
Sat — Please show it to your adrt 
if you have any guts. 

XS5 



Editor's note: With obscenities 1 
leted, the above letter is fairly re? 
sentative of the inept anonytf 
correspondence with which an ei' 
is occasionally bothered. We F 
lish this, merely as eloquent supP 
of our general policy to ignore 
anonymous contributions. 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1941 



Much-Talk-No-Do Regime Ended 
With Formation Of Dance Band 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



'Much talk — no do" best describi 
the reactions of the students to var- 
ious proposals made the past several 
years that a campus band be organ- 
ized. At long last, steps have been 
taken toward that end. 

A thirteen piece band, under the 
direction of Francis Mead, has been 
formed. During the first week of 
school, some of the boys who liked to 
play or play at musical instrument 
formulated a wild scheme — they were 
going to organize a dance band. 

The enthusiasts looked around a 
bit and converted a few freshmen to 
their scheme. They pitched in and 
pooled their supplies of music. After 
the first ragged rehearsals, they man- 
aged to sound less formidable. 

At present, the band includes elev- 
en instrumentalists and a vocalist, in 
addition to conductor-manager Mead 
They rehearse regularly twice a week; 
"daneeable" music is their specialty. 
Through the kindness of "Hacky" 
Rothermel's father, a public address 
system has been secured, 

The purpose of the band is best de- 
scribed in the words of Francis Mead, 
who was ^instrumental in its organiza- 



tion: "After holding an informal ses- 
sion and seeing possibilities for an ex 
cellcnt dance orchestra, we decided 
to become serious about it, because 
as we all can see, the College needs 
some stimulation in order to arouse 
pep and raise student morale. 

"At the same time, we thought our 
dance band would be the answer to 
two prayers: the students', for more 
dances, and ODK's, for less debt. 
Having observed many bands come 
down here with insufficient prepara- 
tion and faulty organization and get 
paid good money to play, we thought 
and think our plans will be feasible. 
We will not, however, make a pre- 
miere until we feel that our band is 
capable." 

The members of the band are: 
conductor, Francis Mead; saxophones, 
Ted Hazlitt, Jack Hitchcock, Jimmy 
Crouch, and Hack Rothermel; clari- 
nets, Ted Hazlitt and Jack Hitch- 
cock; trumpets, Paul Ruark and Dick 
Lynch; trombones, Calvin Lynch, and 
Don McClelland; guitar, Otts How- 
ard; drums, Chuck Willson; piano, 
Hope Marie Jones; and vocalist, Rudy 
Parks. 



Bossy, "Ain't No Bull," Adds 

Color To Homecoming Fete 



by Robert Corley 

What should the surprised and be- 
ihlered student body and alumni, 
ot to mention Dr. Mead and Mr. 
Jimmy, see reposing and munching 
contentedly before the Lambda Chi 
house but a cow, the Saturday before 
he game with Randolph-Macon. A 
enowfence had been turned into a 
corral and the corn stalks spread 
round for her palate. 
A long sign hung across the fra- 
ternity house porch stating in no un- 
lertain terms what we intended to do 
Randolph-Macon. And there 
graciously adorning Bossy's sides 
were two imposing posters announc- 
ng far and wide that this wasn't just 
. lot of malarkey either. 
For the first time in four years sev- 
ra! Lambda Chi's actually saw day- 
treak. And what for? No less than 
:ow. As Chief's truck rumbled ov- 
the country roads from farm to 
arm with a load of shivering sleepy- 
ij'ed, begging, persuading the home 
oiks to lend them a cow for a few 
lours. Things were certainly look- 
rig black, until a young, good-natur- 
id farmer, Mr. Albert Sutton, sur- 



rendered to their entreaties and 
granted them Bossy for the remain- 
ing hours before the game. After 
much struggling and straining Bossy 
was hoisted in the truck and on her 
way to a fate worse than death. 

Bossy withstood the trip very well, 
and made her startling debut with 
poise and graciousness. Wondering 
crowds collected staring skeptically at 
the bovine beauty and her strange 
surroundings. Then as the light 
came to them and they caught the 
significance — in simple words they 
got the joke, they moved on with a 
laugh. Some wide-eyed beauties, 
however, needed explanations and, 
diagrams. 

However, we must bow our head: 
and admit that she must have been 
a he — and the sign painter must have 
been a prevaricator — for the Big Red 
Team bowed to the invaders. How- 
ever, it was an ambitious adventure, 
and provided many laughs. It also 
added color to our homecoming cele- 
bration. This should be a starter for 
more ambitious stunts for future 
homecomings, Nice going Lambda 
Chi! 



With The 



Greeks 



Alpha Chi Omega 
The Alpha Chi Omega's entertained 
be rushees at a Catalina Beach-com- 
ir party Tuesday night in Reid Hall, 
he decorations carried out the theme 
ith beach umbrellas and palm 
aves. 

The formal party for the rushees 
JjBs held on Thursday night both in 
eid Hall and the Sorority room. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Turner announced 
he marriage of their daughter Mar- 
ket Ann, class of '41, to Ralph Em- 
iord at the intermission party Satur- 
iy night at their home. The mar- 
age took place April 14, 1940. - 

Join The Red Cross 

Alpha Omicron Pi 
Monday night the A. O. Pi's held a 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 

Radio Headquarters 



"Cook It Yourself" party in Reid 
Hall. The rushees and actives cook- 
ed their own food in the A. O. Pi 
diner. 

The annual formal party was held 
in Reid Hall Wednesday. 

Join The Red Cross 

Zeta Tau Alpha 

Tuesday night Zeta Tau Alpha held 
a school house party in Reid Hall. The 
Freshmen were both instructed but 
also taught the technique used in a 



▼ 

Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

▲ 



fire drill; hence the ringing of the 
bell which attracted the attention of 
the campus. After school lunches 
were opened and recess was declared. 
The annual formal party will be 
held at Reid Hall Friday night. 

Join The Red Cross 

Kappa Alpha 
Twenty-two alumni visited the KA 
chapter over Homecoming, which 
turned out to be a gala week-end, 
featured by the football game with. 
Randolph-Macon, the Homecoming 
Dance, chapter intermission party at! 
the Voshell House, and the alumni, 
dance. 

Beta Omega pledged four men this 

week: Francis McNiff, John Kardash, 

and Wilson Reidy, members of the 

senior class, and Pet Di Palma, a jun- 

r. 

Join The Red Cross 

Theta Chi 
Twenty-four alumni visited their 
chapter house this week-end. Beside 
the dance all the Brothers were en- 
tertained at the Voshel House during 
intermission. 

Join The Red Cross 

Lambda Chi Alpha 
Many alumni returned to the cam- 
pus and house for Homecoming and 
enjoyed a banquet held at the Ches- 
tertown Restaurant. 

On Tuesday night Basil Clark 



"Dutch" Smith, Robert Corley, and 
OUie Littleton attended a meeting of 
the Lambda Chi Club of Baltimore. 
The feature of the evening was a 



short talk by Russell Shetlerley, new- 
ly elected national president on the 
national convention this past summer. 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builders 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campus Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 
Chestertown, Md. 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPTMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



Choose 

Hochschild, Kohn & Co. 

for correct 

Campus and College Wear 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

Leed S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



I — Remember ! 



Of COURSE . . . You all remember the Washington Elm Style 
show which is to come off tonite but we thought you might like 
a little preview. The curtain opens on studio A of station 
W-E-L-M which is just about to go on the air. We see Lloyd 
Davis, Rufe Johnson, Lee Walbert, and "Big" Jim Stevens, hur- W* 
rying into their positions. Whom should we see next! Models? 
But I almost forgot that you and your date and everyone else, 
will be at the show so I won't spoil your fun by saying any- 
more. 




Time: 7:45 P. M. 

Place: William Smith Hall 

Door Prize: Gay Gibson Junior Dress 



PACA'S 

A Smart Shop For Women 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1941 



Hockey Teams 
Are Completed 
For Fall Season 



Sho'men Travel 
To Meet Indians 
In Third Game 



Four Teams Named By Miss 

Doris; Many Veterans Will 

Play For Seniors 



The senior team is composed of the 
veterans who have played these same 
positions every year with a few 
changes. Virginia Hoopes, Cather- 
ine Newton, Francis Kreeger, Mary 
Liz Humphries, and Lois Stevens are 
on the front line. 

The halves will probably be Alice 
Johanns, Minor Steele, who has been 
moved from goal to take the key po- 
sition provided Peggy Pitt will take 
her old position at goal, and Mary 
Kintner. The fullbacks will be Mary 
Landen Russell and Mary Nardi. 

The junior team is the one team 
that is standing as in former years. 
Helen Marie Culver, Ellen Peters, 
Virginia Cooper, Betty Dockhorn, and 
Francis Harris will play on the front 
line. The halfbacks will be Naomi 
Russell, Jane Lyon and Molly Black- 
wood. Phyllis Peters and Ann Fen- 
derson will be fullbacks, while Jean 
Wood guards the goal. She will be 
recalled as last year's varsity goalie. 

The sophomore team has some 
changes but the probable line-up will 
be Mary Lu Truslow, Pete Hammond, 
Laura Rainy, Ann Rouse, Dot Reidy 
on the front line. Halfbacks will be 
Irma Rogers, Betty Hill and Pat 
Frary. Fullbacks will be Helen Sev- 
erson and Dola Sylvester. Sally Wae- 
she has sacrificed her position at cen- 
ter half to play the much needed po- 
sition of goalie in place of Pat Clary, 
' who did not return to the campus^ 

The freshman team as usual has not 
been definitely settled upon, as the 
girls will probably alternate in play- 
ing various positions. Those who 
will alternate in playing front line po- 
sitions will be Marie Thornton, Grace 
Neighbor, Eleanor Newton, Alice 
Sutherland, Betty Nash, Charlotte 
Hignutt, Harriet Olsen, Joan John- 
ston, and Grace Stouffer. In the 
same manner, the halves will be Ruth 
Broadwater, Joan Johnson, Ann Boil- 
ing, Betty Gardner, Dorothy Rein- 
doller, and~"Very Goodwin. Mariana 
Everngam, Eleanor Harnischfegar, 
Mimi Ocker, Jean Horn, Peggy Gill- 
and will probably play fullbacks, with 
Mariana Evemgam probably playing 



Maroons Are Underdogs In 

Third Game Of Season ; 

Lack Scoring Punch 

by John Kardash 

This afternoon, the Ekaitismen 
journey to Huntington, Pa., to en- 
counter the Juniata Indians tomor- 
row, Saturday. The Sho'men, with 
a record of one victory and one loss, 
face a difficult task in earning a notch 
in the win column over the Indians. 
Coach Swartz of Juniata has an eleven 
possessing weight and speed. 

Because of the loss of seven varsi- 
ty men through graduation, the draft 
and other minor reasons, includin; 
Captain Bill Bonsell via the army 
route, the prospects for the Indian's 
'41 season looked very weak indeed 
just before school opened. Eleven 
good Sophomores will be fighting for 
the varsity berths in addition to a 
dozen lively-looking freshmen, which 
will compensate for the fact that only 
two seniors and one junior letterman 
have returned to the squad. 

Rekles and Zwicker are the end; 
for the Indians. The former is the 
tallest member of the squad; whereas 
the latter, 190 pounds and aggressive, 
is sterling on the defensive. Lou 
Valenzir, senior, and Hoover, are 
guards. Valenzi's speed makes him 
a good running guard. Smith and 
Gingrich, 5'8", 205 pounder, quarter- 
miler on the track team, are the 
tackles. Brurner, backfield, is 
hard runner and a good pass catcher. 
Leeper is a fast, rugged fullback 
weighing close to 200 pounds. At 



Gill's 

Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 



vsvc*«^v<^NXv«vv\xsNSN^v\N«N\VkVN^*\x\v«x»>vxss 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

M0N7-TUES.-WEdV0CT. 27 - 28 - 29 
— The Musical Triumph In Technicolor — 
JEANETTE MacDONALD and 

BRIAN AHERNE in 

"SMILIN' THROUGH" 

— with — 
GENE RAYMOND - IAN HUNTER 
The NEW "Smilin' Through" set to mus- 
ic and swept with the glory of TECHNI- 
COLOR. The Queen of Song in the most be- 
loved romance of our time. 

FIRST RUN SHOWING DAY AND 
DATE WITH LOEW'S CENTURY IN 
BALTIMORE. 



THUR.-FRI.-SAT., OCT. 30-31, NOV. 1 

BIG DOUBLE FEATURE ATTRACTION 

W. C. FIELDS in 

"NEVER GIVE A SUCKER 

AN EVEN BREAK" 

— with — 

GLORIA JEAN - LEON ERROL 

The great Nosepiece at his Nosiest in his 

brand new comedy hit playing here at a 

PRE-VUE Showing ahead of the large 

cities. 

—Plus 

JOHN MACK BROWN in 

"THE MASKED RIDER" 



X%\X\V*VN\\X\XNNNVSNVV\XX\A\\\*\\\N\*\X\\\V*\S\X\VXN 



center is Dunmirc who performs very 
capably. Rutledge, a good blocker 
and tackier, and Burgerstoll, a swift 
runner complete the backfield candi- 
dates. 

On the other hand, the Sho'men, 
who have defeated the Indians in the 
last two years by the scores of 13-0 
and 13-7, respectively, will start the 
same line-up as last week. The 
Maroons will definitely have to exhib- 
. stronger defense and more offen- 
sive punch in order to make this a 
successful season. The Ekaitismen 

n their first two tussels have failed 
to display scoring punch and defen- 
sive strength. The passer is being 

ushed off his feet and scoring chanc 
es have been passed up by the Sho' 
men. 



SIDELINES 

Ray Kirby, bone and muscle line- 
man, played a bang-up game, his 
tackles were of the sensational varie- 
ty — when the Senator hits them they 
stay hit! Lew Yerkes' running and 
kicking was good, studes, in fact, Lew 
is one of the best in our League, did 
eh a notice his haircut? 

Moberg, R. M. end, who scored one 
of his team's tallies made a tremend 
ous boot of about 85 yards in the sec 
ond period — he sure got a big kick out 
of the game, eh? 



GIRLS' 

SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



o 



NOD OF THE WEEK 



Hockey is a time-honored sport 
here at Washington College since it 
was begun in 1928 by a group of 
sports conscious co-eds and Miss 
Doris. At that time, practices were 
held out on the main athletic field af- 
ter football practice. Saturdays 
were also devoted to practice when 
the boys were playing away. 

Their enthusiasm and persistence 
won the interest of the faculty and 
the following year hockey was intro- 
duced as a major sport. 

Fencing, too, has an interesting 
story behind it. This sport was for- 
warded by interested citizens of the 
town, especially Mr. Neal Truslow, 
whose daughter we all know as the 
winner of the cup presented last year 
to the most outstanding athlete. 
Fencing has been doomed to a minor 
role in our sports curriculum for two 
reasons. It is by far the most stren- 
uous of all woman's sports, requiring 
constant practice, and other sports 
are more beneficial to those who are 
entering the field of education. 



Bill Loll, of Bridgeton, N. J., right 
end, deserves the honor this week be. 
cause of his sterling defensive play 
in the game last week. 

Bill was constantly on the alert and 
on numerous occasions charged in to 
throw the Jackets back for large loss- 
es. His perception of plays was good 
and Bill proved this when he downed 
the ball-carrier on reverse plays 
end sweeps. He is only a freshman 
and if he continues to perform 
such commendable fashion the rest of 
the season, Coach Ekaitis will have 
developed a fine end for the future 



STATISTICS 

Washington Randolph-Macon 

4 First downs m 

1 Fumbles l 

15 Passes attempted 15 

3 Passes completed 

Passes intercepted 

30 Punts (average) 




Dr. Julian T, Power 

OPTOMETRIST 



Chestertown, Maryland 

Phone 132W 




BEAT 
P. M. C. 



Ine 




Elm 



BEAT 
P. M. C. 



Vol. XLI. No. 7. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1941 



Price Five Cents 



Smooching Closed Stacks, Dean Discloses; 

Eight Seniors, Junior Make Who's Who 



jth, Clark, Davis, Kirby, 
Bartolini, Johnson, Lore, 
Jones, Mooney Named 



NINE COLLEGIANS WIN NATIONAL HONOR 



Blei 



Nine men of the Senior and Junioi 

isaes were notified this week of theii 

for Who's Who In American 

lieges and Universities. Eitrht 

eniors and one Junior, representing 

wide field of campus leadership. 

;ro selected by the Collegiate Who's 

/ho on the basis of nominations sub- 

J by an undisclosed faculty com- 

littee. Those elected were Dave 

tolini, Basil C. Clark, Lloyd R. 

tnvis, Rufus C. Johnson, J. Calvert 

ncs, Jr., A. Rayfield Kirby, Harry 

Lore, Jr., Albert Mooney, Donald 

, Smith. All except Mooney are 

niors, 

Each of these men have been asked 
o submit an abbreviated biography 
o Who's Who for publication. Sum- 
laries of the activities and the hon- 
rs of each man can be found on 
They are also asked by 
Yho's Who to answer a question- 
iire. 

Questions Cover Large Field 

This questionnaire covers the fields | 
f education, marriage, politics, eco- 
omics, religion, music, and war is- 
ues. On most questions there was 

diversity of opinion. One question 
sks who is the most popular indivi- 
today. Eight out of nine se- 
cted Roosevelt, although they did 
ot all approve of his policies. Mooney 
icked La Guardia as most popular. 
In the question of declaration of war 
gainst Germany four out of nine an- 

ered "yes". The same four also 
tatt'd that they would volunteer for 
Ervice in such a case. 

Six of these men consider the Gold 
*entagon as the greatest honor given 
n this campus, while three chose the 
residency of the Student Council. 
heir reasons for obtaining a college 
ducation included preparation for 
l'ofession, background, and a degree, 
jive said they came for preparation; 

o, for background; and two, for a 
egree. Only two of the nine men 
record against subsidization 
f athletics. 

Tyrone Power Selected 

Tyrone Power was acclaimed the 
ost popular cinema actor with four 
Jtes. Charles Laughton received 
wo checks. As for the Hollywood 
fitnesses it was a toss-up between 
■iiida Darnell, Lana Turner and Bet- 
s' Grable. 

Only two of the boys said they 
Hild marry on a dime. The others 
■H wait until they are financially 
foe. They will look for the quali- 
3 of love, companionship, devotion, 
^selfishness, and adoration in choos- 
n S their wife. Johnson added to 
pis list the quality of "oomph", 
hich he tried to define as "an inde- 
xable something usually absents 
All of them considered their selec- 
tion for Who's Who a first-rate hon- 
r ; however, some suggested a small 
umber of selections from this col- 
e. Most of them thought it would 
doable recommendation to bus- 
le *s men. 




Two Newcomers 
Win Lead Roles 



From left to right — Bottom row: Rufus Johnson, Calvert Jones, Harry Lore, Albert 
Mooney; Second row: Rayfield Kirby, Donald Smith, Basil Clark; Third row: David Barto- 
lini, Lloyd Davis. 



Local Winners 
Select Dresses 



Johnston And Revele Will Take College Girl And Town Woman 
Leads In "Smilin' Thru" Receive Paca Prizes 



The cast for "Smilin* Through", 
the first production of the Washing- 
ton Players, will include two new 
names in leading roles. Joan John- 
ston, a freshman, will play the part 
of the sweet Irish heroine, Kathleen. 
Bill Revele, another new comer will 
have the difficult role of playing as 
both a young man and an old man, 
Sir John Carteret. 

Veterans will play the other lead- 
ing roles. Betty Hill, famous for 
"Our Town" will do the difficult role 
of Moonyean. Kenneth Wayne, the 
young American hero, will be done by 
Lloyd Davis. The humour of the 
play will be furnished by Bill Roe in 
the part of Willie Ainley, the English 
suitor. Upperclassmen will remem- 
ber Roe's hilarious actions in a melo- 
dramatic comedy given by the Play- 
ers last Spring. 

Lee Lachmar, another actress of 
merit, will play the role of the house- 
keeper, Ellen while Molly Blackwood 
will play the part of Moonyean's sis- 
ter. Jeremiah Wayne and Owen 
Harding will be portrayed by Frances 
Mead and Henry Lyon respectively. 

Smaller parts in the play have not 
been selected. 



Selection for a commission in the 
United States Marine Corps Reserves 
is an honor recently bestowed upon 
John Stack, an aviation cadet in the 
United States Air Station at Jackson- 
ville, Florida, a member of the class 
of '40, is the son of Dr. and Mrs. 
James Stack, of Crumpton, Md. 



Miss Mary Nicholson and Helen 
Marie Culver, a junior, both of Ches- 
tertown, were the winners of the two 
prizes given by the Gay Gibson Jun- 
ior Dress Company at the Fall Fash- 
ion Show. The door prize went to 
Miss Nicholson when her ticket, one 
of the two hundred sold, was drawn 
from the box at the conclusion of the 
show, while Helen Marie won hers for 
selling the greatest number of tickets 
to the show. 

Miss Nicholson selected one of the 
dresses shown by Miss Paca. It was 
a brown spectator dress with pencil 
fastenings and soft fullness at the 
front of the skirt. The dress Helen 
Marie chose was not modeled; it was 
a three tone wool drindle. The 
blouse and skirt were of tan, and the 
midriff of brown bordered with green. 

Helen Marie won her dress by sell- 
ing thirty-eight tickets, but Miss 
Nicholson won hers with a ticket that 
had been given to her. 



Y Opens Bureau 
For Local Jobs 

Townspeople Will Cooperate 
To Aid Students 



Dr. Klein Is In Hospital 

At four o'clock this morning Dr. 
Albert Klein of the Biology Depart- 
ment was rushed to Kent-Queen 
Anne's General Hospital for an emer- 
gency appendectomy. 

His condition was reported this 
noon as favorable. 



Preparations for the first public ap- 
pearance of the Glee Club will begin 
Thursday evening. The club, 62 
voices strong, will hold its first con- 
cert at the First Methodist Church. 



As a new service for the college, 
the Y. M. C. A. is establishing a Stu- 
dent Employment Bureau for local 
part-time jobs according to William 
Nagler, President of the "Y". The 
Y. W. C. A. will be invited to cooper- 
ate in this project. 

An executive committee composed 
of Charles B. Nairn, director of the 
bureau, Philis Peters, President of 
the Y. W. C. A., and John R. Smith, 
a Y. M. C. A. member will work out 
details of the service. 

The bureau will function in con- 
junction with local merchants, town 
people, and others in furnishing work- 
ers for various odd jobs. Any stu- 
dent desiring work will submit his 
name with his schedule of work to 
Nairn, director of this service. 

The central headquarters will be es- 
tablished at the Lambda Chi Alpha 
Fraternity House, since the director 
can be most easily contacted there. 
This service will include part-time 
jobs of all types from tending bab- 
ies to part-time clerical work. It is 
necessary that a student's schedule 
of work be included in his application 
so that the director will be able to se- 
lect a student for a given job who has 
a free period. Nagler states that the 
service will go into effect as soon as 
patrons can be contacted. 



Miss Thelma Viol, contralto, and 
Miss Martha Svendsen, pianist, of 
Peabody Conservatory of Music, Bal- 
timore, will perform at the assembly 
next week, according to Mr. Goodwin. 



Reporter Learns "Whole Story" 

And Student Reaction To 

Closure Of Stacks 



by Robert Hill 

"Some of the students were mak- 
ing use of the Library stacks for 
smooching and necking purposes", ex- 
plained Dean Livingood to a slightly 
indignant Elm reporter, to whom the 
Dean had just said, "I don't think the 
article in the Elm last week told the 
whole story." 

Accepting Dean Livingood's chal- 
lenge, your reporter has canvassed 
the administration, questioned Mr. 
Coleman, and sampled student opin- 
ion, in order to present "the whole 
story." 

The Library stacks were not clos- 
ed merely because of noise, Dean Liv- 
ingood made clear, but because of the 
student use of the stacks for social 
purposes. To prevent these practic- 
es, each chair was chained in its re- 
spective study booth. The first night 
three of these chains were broken. 
This act of "vandalism" was the 
"final straw" of many abuses which 
brought about closed stacks. 
AH Suffer For Few 

"It is unfortunate," Dr. Mead told 
your reporter Wednesday afternoon, 
"that the actions of a few have re- 
sulted in the taking away the privil- 
eges of many who would not abuse 
them; but it has become necessary. 
When it is evident that there is unan- 
imous student opinion against taking 
such liberties, it will be possible to 
extend stack privileges to those who 
can make best use of them." 

"When the Library was opened," 
Dr. Mead explained, "the system of 
open stacks was instituted with the 
idea that the students would profit 
by their use, with no necessity of con- 
stant policing by the Librarian to pre- 
serve order or to protect property. 
A small number of students this year 
have been persistent in abusing the 
privilege, even after having been ask- 
ed to respect the liberty they have 
been granted. There has been some 
destruction of property in the stacks 
by these students, and as a result it 
has been necessary to close them." 

"The closing of the stacks," assert- 
ed Mr. Coleman, "was just an easy 
way out of a disciplinary problem." 
"The stacks will not be opened im- 
mediately," Mr. Coleman said, ex- 
plaining facetiously "that a tempor- 
ary shock is worse than none at all." 

Student Opinion Sampled 

Eight out of the ten students se- 
lected at random, who were question- 
ed said that they had been definitely 
inconvenienced by the closing of the 
stacks. However, Mr. Coleman stat- 
ed that "since less than twenty stu- 
dents have applied for permission to 
use the stacks, it shows that the ma- 
jority of the student body has not 
been inconvenienced. I do not see 
that I have been working any hard- 
ship on the student body by closing 
the stacks." 

"I don't feel free to ask if I may go 
back into the stacks everytime I want ■ 
a book," declared Oliver Sutton. "I 
(Continued on Page 6) 



PAGE TWO _______ 

THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 
Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor J° hn Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus c - Johnson 

Dr. H. 0. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1941 



Member 

Associated Collegiate Press 

Distributor of 

Golle6iate Di6est 



RCPniBEHTBD VON 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publitben Reprcsenlaltvt 
AZO Madison AVE. New YORK, N.Y. 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1941 



Desk Editor 
Assistants ,_- 



Hubbard 

Parris, E. Peters 



Open Warfare Spreads To Campus 

Washington College students this week openly declared 
war upon one of the strangest foes that man ever faced— mice. 
The invasion by the enemy began several weeks ago but was 
temporarily halted this week when, according to Chestertown 
hardware dealers, approximately 300 big guns (mouse traps) 
were moved onto the scene of action by the students. 

Students began to suspect the invasion early last week 
when several members of the enemy's, intelligence department 
were discovered hiding in beds, in clothes closets, and in waste 
baskets. The objective of the enemy army seems to be the 
wardrobes of the college. On several fronts they have been 
successful though they have suffered great losses in manpower 
Numerous coats and dresses have been ruined. 

General X of the students announced that his army will at- 
tempt to hold off the enemy until President Y can sign a war- 
time alliance with the Cat Army of Chestertown. 



^^ydnpesl [IfOOTMLLFACTf 




2g§§ 



From A Girl 
e who are ashamed to s 
M to the letter in last week'i 



_Someccw5ms originated at Jlps 

THE U.OF ILLINOIS IN 1910/ ' >W^ 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



DREAM SESSION 
ANONYMOUS LETTERS 
THANKS TO BURK 



nts are real 



lly 

down 



very 

deep 
the 



Where 
Were You? 



To tho 
their nam 
ELM. 

Hurting people is no way to get 
what we want. If you have a sugges- 
tion, why don't you come over to the 
office and tell Calvert about it, for 
he's nearly always there, spending 
most of his waking 1 hours in making a 
great success of our paper. We stu- 
dents elected the editor. It isn't his 
paper; it's ours. If there's some- 
thing wrong with the way things are 
going, it's our fault, not his. If i 
fraternity gets more recognition, it's 
because the rest of us don't turn our 
news in on time. Calvert's a KA so 
he naturally knows what's going on in 
his fraternity. It's our job to give 
him the news if we want it printed. 

When you wrote about Ray Kiihy, 
perhaps you didn't realize that he'a 
one of our best players. Have you 
ever done as well? And if you have, 
you're in a position to imagine how 
you'd feel if someone wrote a letter 
like that about you. He's doing his 
best for our college. Are you? 

You have a perfect right to want 
other pictures and different news. So 
cut out the smart alee language and 
come over and talk things over. Re- 
member, it's your paper] 

"L". 



Chestertown Seeks Bus Line 

For the past few years there has been no convenient way 
of getting 1 in or out of Chestertown, unless you are adept at 
hitch-hiking or have some friends who have cars. This situa- 
tion has not been greatly affected by the present railroad sys- 
tem. There was a meeting of the officials on the town board, 
headed by Mayor Wilmer, with W. P. Pippin, Passenger Traffic 
Agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad on Wednesday, October 
22, in view of having a Greyhound bus line connecting Chester- 
town with Elkton or Wilmington. To date, no definite decision 
has been advanced, but if sufficient interest is evinced by organ- 
izations and individuals, it is probable that there may be better 
means of transportation within sixty days. All letters concern- 
ing this should be sent to Mayor Wilmer in Town, so, if you want 
to be able to leave the 'Shore whenever the notion strikes you, 
let the committee hear from YOU. 



Cheerleading A Misunderstanding 

A misunderstanding, presumably on the part of Head 
Cheer Leader Patterson, caused a great deal of unnecessary ill- 
feeling between a few of the fans and the cheer leaders at the 
football game with Randolph-Macon two weeks ago. This 
feeling, justifiable or not, led to somewhat of a let-down of the 
team by the cheering section. 

Patterson was of the opinion that no cheering was to be 
done while the teams were in action, since the cheer leaders 
might obstruct the coach's view. In view of the fans' reactions, 
and in order to avoid future friction, he decided to straighten 
out the matter. Consequently, he went to see Coach Ekaitis. 
The latter advised him to cheer whenever the fans want it, re- 
gardless of whether the team is playing at the moment or not. 

Accordingly, the cheer leaders are improving their organ- 
ization of cheers. "I am glad to have cleared up the matter," 
said Patterson, "and I believe future misunderstandings will be 
avoided. We'll all do our best tomorrow. If the fans back us, 
they'll be yelling from 2 :00 till 4 :00." 



College 
sentimental creatures way 
inside. The other night, 
days work was completed, and paja- 
mas and pipes were the order of the 
day, several settled down to what we 
call a dream session. It's very sim- 
ple the way it works. You simply 
pick out all the sweet, 
records that you have and then turn 
out the lights and sit there in the dark 
with your pipe and listen to them. A 
pipe, a good song, and the dark can 
work wonders in bringing back many 
pleasant memories. 

The songs don't even have to be 
slow and sentimental. They can be 
ongs that once rated at the top of 
the Hit List. Some of the better 1 
ones are "Star Dust", T. Dorsey's 
"I'm Getting Sentimental Over You", 
and Glen Miller's "Moonlight Sere- 
nade." One of the newer recordings 
on the Hill that is receiving lots of 
votes is "Piano Concerto in B Flat." 
What a song. There's only one draw-' 
back to a dream session like this. Be- 
fore the third song is completed, most 
everyone has gone to sleep, and un- 
less you have an automatic recording 
machine, someone has to stay awake 
and do all the dirty work. 

Last week, we violated our editor- 
ial policy by publishing an anony- 
mous letter. Our only reason was to 
find out the author as was stated in 
letter. However, it is our opin- 
that they (the authors) have 
er lost their nerve or else they re- 
alize that the ELM was right. In 
any case, we believe that if they 

Id spend as much time re' 
back numbers of the ELM as they 
did in composing their masterpiece, 
they would find that the ELM has on- 
ly given publicity where publicity was 
deserved. The leade 
pus are tho ones who make the news 
and there are no two ways about 

Many thanks to a past editor of 
the ELM, Bill "Red" Burk, for his 
cooperation in furnishing a special 
article for the ELM. With this — So 
long and thirty. 



"What a life without a wife," says 
Omar Jackson. "Why don't YOU 
boys get married?" Ray Kh-by takes 
empty duffle bags along on trips, to 
bring home the "Bacon", no doubt! 
The "buddy" club has expanded quite 
a bit — the dues are one date a week 
— if you can get it! Pulchritude ga- 
lore paraded Friday night for the 
benefit of feminine eyes — and the 
boys . . . Its all over now, no more 
rushing! They can smoke your cig- 
tal are ttes and you can eat their candy, 
Ain't that lovely? Pickles dresses to 
suit the occasion. He is now dress- 
ed in Khaki-concentration camp 
style. 



Mackrell, freshman ace, got on the 
ball after the Washington-Juni 
game, and tore Coach Ekaitis' new 
bonnet to ribbons. The b'hoys are 
now taking up a collection for the 
coach . . . The new pledges are trying 
promote that "better spirit". The 
Alpha Chi pledges gave a Hallowe'en 
party for the other two pledge groups 
last night . . . Some mention of tea 
ind cookies in "Red" Burk's article. 
Teh, Teh . . . Frosh girls are on the 
le up to Bennett's one night a 
week now. 



A Football Player 

Dear Editor: 

That anonymous letter in Inst 
week's ELM was very interesting to 
me. I would like to speak on the be- 
half of Ray Kirby, not because he is 
a fraternity brother of mine, but be- 
cause I play beside him on the foot- 
ball field and I know how he plays. 

Last year, Ray Kirby was named 
the only All-Maryland football player 
from Washington College. This year 
he is playing even a greater game 
than he played last. In my opinion, 
he could make the team in any col- 
lege he attended, large or small. When 
a small college like Washington has a 
player like that, his picture can't be 
put in the paper too often. I believe 
this is the opinion of the whole ath- 
letic department. 

AI Dudderat. 



Hal Freeman has decided to end it 
all — he is going to get married next 
month — for a more detailed account, 
just ask Hal. Wilson Reidy has tak- 
up farming on a minor scale — he 
lies ears of corn in his pockets, to 
attract the chickens . . . Hmmmmm? 
Some people are blushing . . . the 
stacks were closed, as you probably 
know, because they had been used for 
purposes other than talking, studying 
and sleeping . . . well? The "Y's" 
idea for a dancing class after lunch 
on Wednesday met with a great turn- 
out, not only of the non-dancers but 
of the professionals as well (Peanut, 
Pickles). 



The Pegasus photographer will be 
on the campus Monday, November 3 
through Wednesday, November 5 
Senior, fraternity and sorority pic- 
tures will be taken. Please watch 
the bulletin board for your schedul- 
ed appointment noting especially the 
place and time. 



A Student 

Dear Editor: 

Congratulations for printing in th( 
October 24 ELM the derogatory let- 
ter signed XXX. It shows that oar 
paper is big enough to print any crit- 
icism, even such nonsense as this. 
There is an old saying "it takes 
kinds to make a world", . . . apparent- 
ly even poor sports. 

Ray Kirby certainly deserves aH 
the space that the ELM can devote t* 
him. In addition to all the extra- 
curricular activities in which he i 
prominent, Ray is co-captain of the 
football team, a member of the 19*1 
All-Maryland team, and an outstand 
ing player this year. 

It seems only fair to "give credi 
where credit is due." If Kirby de 
serves a picture or a writeup, give i 
to him. 

J. Aycocfc 



And An Athlete 

Dear Editor: 

Just like myself, a lot of people v 
this campus are getting darned tit? 
of the way a few jealous students ar 
knocking those who do work. Tha 
anonymous letter in last week's EL) 
was the climax. Perhaps the KA 
do run the paper but it's only becatf 
they're the only ones who are willfi 
to sacrifice a little of their time ft 
the college. How many other fi* 
ternity men work on the ELM 
sides KA's? 

And perhaps it is true the K 
{Continued on Page 6) 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



BARNETT'S 

BARBER SHOP 

rrf Upstairs Opposite Court 
House. 



CHESTERTOWN 

BANK 

OF 

MARYLAND 



24 Girls Pledge To Sororities 



Alumni Chapter National Officer 
In Wilmington Sees Alpha Chis 



New Group Organized Mon- 
day; Dr. Jones Presides 



D O R F ' S 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 



H i 



: b Street 



The First 
National Bank 

Of Chestertown 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Tydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 

Paints, Hardware and 

Farm Machinery 

Chestertown Phone 51 



Twenty-five Washington College 
alumni organized a Delaware chap- 
ter last Monday evening at an infor- 
mal dinner at The Hob, Wilmington, 
largely through the efforts of Miss 
Miriam E. White, '29, and Ralph R. 
Thornton, '40. 

Emmett G. Kauffman, '32, was 
elected president of the chapter. Oth- 
er officers are Delano K. Boynton, 
'35, vie'e-president; Miss Miriam E. 
White, '29, secretary, and Mrs. Gladys' 
Coucill Garber. '33, treasurer. These 
officers and three additional member?,: 
W. D. R. Straughn, '21; Mrs. Dorothy 
Knotts Gray, '29; and Albert Bilan-: 
cioni, '3(5, compose an executive com-j 
mittee. 

The first meeting was called to or- 
der by Dr. William Jones, secretary] 
of the General Alumni Association. I 
Dr. Emmet F. Hitch, '04, was elected i 
temporary chairman; and Miss Mir- 
iam E. White, temporary secretary, j 
Ernest A. Howard, '05, chairman of 
the nominating committee, reported 
the nominations for permanent offi- 
cers. All the nominations were ac- 
cepted as submitted. 



Participated In Meetings And 
Pledge Ceremony 

Mrs. Francis McKean, National 
Councilor of Alpha Chi Omega, ac 
companied by Mrs. Harry I. McPher- 
son, Jr., Province President for the 
Middle Atlantic States, arrived last 
Saturday afternoon for a visit with 
the Beta Pi Chapter. 

Mrs. McKean remained until Tues 



National Officer 



Curvacious 



Kent County Savings Bank 

Commercial and Savings 
Accounts 

Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 



phone 14 





Mrs. Francis McKean 



day so that she might have the oppor- 
tunity to meet each of the girls and 
participate in a chapter .meeting and 
pledge ceremony, and various officers' 
meetings. The Chapter was fortun- 
ate in having these two officers come 
at that time as they were able to join 
in welcoming the new pledges and 
bringing them closer to the national 
fraternity. 



Alpha Omicron Pi Takes Nine 

Zeta Tau Alpha Eight, And 

Alpha Chi Omega Seven 



Twenty-one Freshmen girls, two 
Sophomores, and one Junior, wer 
given bids to sororities at the end of 
the sorority rushing last week. Judge 
Stephen R. Collins determined the 
preferential order Saturday after- 
noon, and the invitations were issued 
at four-thirty. Sorority rushing end- 
ed formally Friday night at eleven 
o'clock, with the beginning of silence 
period. The Alpha Chi's pledged 
seven girls, the Zeta Tau Alpha's 
pledged eight and the Alpha Omicron 
Pi's pledged nine girls. The pledges 
are as follows: 

Alpha Chi Omega 

Paggy Ann Bauer, Havre de Grace. 
Vivien Dinger, Silver Spring. 
Jean Avis Graber, Chester, Pa. 
Miriam Heathcote Ocker, Towson. 
Grace Neighbor, Arlington, Pa, 
Dorothy Reidy, Chestertown. 
Lois Stevens, Chestertown. 

Zeta Tau Alpha 

Ruth Jean Broadwater, Chesapeake 
City. 

Joan Maria Connors, New York, 
N. Y. 

Ellen Sophia Edwards, Greensboro. 

Mariana Everngam, Denton. 

Charlotte Rose Hignutt, Denton. 

Mary Lu Lumpkin, Chestertown. 

Harriet B. Olsen, Elmer, N. J. 

Dorothy Alice Reindollar, Balti- 
more. 

Alpha Omicron Pi 

Ann Boiling, Sandy Spring. 
Elizabeth Dorsey, Chestertown. 
Eleanor Harnischfeger, Baltimore. 
Pete Hammond, Upper Falls. 
Joan Johnston, Middlebury, Pa. 
Betty Nash, Narberth, Pa. 
Grace Stoffer, Takoma Park. 
Alice Southerland, Towson. 
Maria Thronton, Worton. 



Plans For Joint Fraternity- 
Sorority Meeting Abandoned 



Curvacious Ann Eden, former 
co-ed at the University of Mis- 
souri, says that interest in extra 
curricular activities in school pays 
dividends after graduation. Ann 
was active in the dramatic society 
at the V. of Missouri and after 
graduation continued acting on 
the Broadway stage. She was seen 
in Noel Coward's "Set to Music," 
"Abe Lincoln in Illinois," and 
"George Washington Slept Here." 
While appearing in Chicago in 
"George Washington Slept Here," 
she made her radio debut. Since 
then she has worked on such CBS 
programs as "Columbia Work- 
shop," "Joyce Jordan — Girl Inter- 
ne," "Kate Smith Hour'' and 
others. 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



Plans for a joint meeting of the in 
ter-fratemity and inter-sorority coun 
cils, which was to have been held yes- 
terday, have been abandoned, and the 
idea of an inter-Greek dance has been 
given up. 

Much discussion has been going on 
around the camps concerning an in- 
ter-Greek dance. It was contended 
that such a dance, if promoted, would 
combine the efforts and finances of all 
iiaternities and sororities and do 
away with the inter-fraternity and in 
ter-sorority dances. The main idea 
behind this was to get a big nann 
band and at the same time to give the 
College some good publicity. 

The sororities were unanimously 
opposed to the idea, however, and the 
following opinions of fraternity and 
sorority .presidents illustrate that no 
compromise could be effected. 

Ellen Peters, Zeta Tau Alpha— 
"I don't think we have enough for 
mal dances and the girls wouldn't 
want to ask the boys. Besides the 
boys would run everything and the 
girls would do the dirty work." 

Minor Steele, Alpha Omicron Pi — 
"I don't consider it fair to the g: 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



because the intersorority dance is the 
only occasion when they can pay back 
their obligations and do what they 
want to for a change." 

Mary Liz Humphreys, Alpha Chi 
Omega — "I was all for it at first, but 
now I think there are too few for- 
mals. Besides the girls want their 
own dance and I think it would be 
just a fraternity dance instead of an 
inter-Greek dance." 

David Bartolini, Kappa Alpha — 
"Good idea, our only chance of get- 
ting a good orchestra." 

Basil Clark, Lambda Chi Alpha — 
"I think it's a good idea but not prac- 
tical from a financial standpoint. The 
gym. is not large enough and accord- 
ing to college regulations the time al- 
lotted for dancing would not be suf- 
ficient for a big name band." 

Lloyd Davis, Theta Chi — "This 
would be our best chance to bring 
back more alumni — and would inspire 
more cooperation between fraterni- 
ties and sororities as well as being 
excellent advertising for the college." 



Dr. W. H. Moyer 

CHIROPRACTOR 
X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 



KENT COUNTY 

FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Phone 173 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber, Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 
Phono S 



FORD and MERCURY 
Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



HADAWAY GROCERY 
Meats and Vegetables 

Phone 37 
Cross Street, Chestertown 



MACK'S 




RADIO 


. 


SHOP 


Kent News 


Building 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 



Expert Contractors - 

Phone 305 - 288 — Can 

CHESTERTOWN. 



Builders 
pus Ave. 
MD. 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 

Radio Headquarters 



WILLIAM'S 

Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A complete line supplies plus all texts 

For all classes 

OPEN — 9-12; 2:15 - 5:15 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1941 



Tough Contest Tomorrow 
Predicted By 'Red'Burk 

Chester Times Sports Editor, 3 Letter Alumnus, Contributes 
Special Write-up Of P. M. C. Game For The Elm 



Thrice Weekly mod of the week 

Practice Opens 
For Basketball 



by Bill "Red" Burk 
Sports Editor, Chester Times 

Chester, Pa., October 30. — The 
clash between the P. M. C. Cadets of 
Chester and the stream-lined Ekaitis 
hipper-dipper machine, should be one 
of the best ball games to grace Kiblei- 
Stadium since we licked St. Johns in 
1927. Boy that was a battle. 

P. M. C. has been up and down like 
a white hope in the heavyweight 
ranks, but don't sell the Shavetails 
short — right now they're up. They 
trimmed Lebanon Valley last week, 
14-0, and looked classy in turning the 
trick. The Flying Dutchmen from 
Annville (Pa.) had knocked off Al- 
bright 27 to 13 a week earlier. 

Coaches Ekaitis and Kibler watch- 
ed P. M. C. against Delaware and 
West Chester. They were strictly 
down days. The Blue Hens are real- 
ly hot this year, but you Sho'men will 
have to get steamed up for that one 
later. The Teachers were lucky — 
P. M. C. didn't use Billy Nurthen and 
Bucky Hartnett tried to play on one 
leg. You can't do that. 

P. M. C. Victorious Last Year 
Last year Washington and the 
Cadets tore into each other for sixty 
minutes of bruising football and P. 
M. C. won. The Cadets were lucky. 
Afterwards several of us Alumni 
(Ollie Robinson, Billy Usilton, Har- 
ry Russell, etc.) got together with 
Coach Ekaitis over some tea and toast 
and agreed to the following points: 
1, P. M. C. was only able to win be- 
cause a whistle-loving fugitive from 
the Philadelphia ■ Institute of the 
Blind called a 15-yard penalty against 
the Sho'men to give the Cadets a first 
down on the Washington six; 2, Wash- 
ington would have won if the measur 
ing line had been a half-inch shorter 
enabling the Ekaitis outfit to eke out 
a first on the P. M. C. four-yard line 
3, There will be a different story this 
year. 

Judging from the above outburst 
one would think your commentator 
slightly prejudiced. It's funny, but 
maybe we are. After four years un- 
der Coach Kibler you never can see 
anything as important as a Washing- 
ton victory. The boys of P. M. C 
know how we feel. Last year they 
loaded us down with about fifteen 
bucks orth of bets. This year they 
loaded us down with about fifteen 
bucks worth of bets. This year they 
be seeking revenge. 

We're rather glad P. M. C. and 
Washington have resumed their riv- 
alry in football, as well as in othe: 



sports. Having been around^ the P. 
M. C. Cadets for quite a few years 
we know them to be mighty fine 
youngsters who are at all times striv- 
ing for victory, but always in a clean 
and above board fashion. That's the 
way Coaches Si Pauxtis, Bob Mc- 
Namara and Ed Cramp teach them, 
and that's the spirit behind the school 
%vith the President and Commander, 
Colonel Frank K. Hyatt, being the 
leading exponent. 
P. M. C. Has Razzlc-Dazzle Attack 
P. M. C. has a new style razzle- 
dazzle attack which you fans will 
like. It runs from a rocking chair 
formation that is strictly a novelty. 
Several good running backs will wear 
the Red, White and Gold uniforms. 
Bucky Hartnett, injured most of the 
year but fresh now, is one of the best 
small college backs in the country. 
Nurthen is an excellent passer. Vince 
Bartolomeo is a great kicker. Twice 
this year he has booted better than 
fifty yards angling out at the one 
yard line. The best runners are 
Larry Miller, Eddie Piff, and Nur- 
then, while San Lapolla is an excel- 
lent safety man. 

The line has been doing iron men 
duty all year. Tackle Bob Watkins 
(220), and guard George Orsin; 
(190), are perhaps the best on the 
forward wall. Wes Smith (190), 
the other tackle, Charley Schiavo 
(170), the other guard, ends George 
Wilkins (195), and Horace Russo 
(170), and center Art Riley (170), 
round out the forward wall. Captain 
Babe Dignazio (190), is a great play- 
er, but has been on the sidelines with 
injuries most of the year. 

That's about all for the present and 
we'll be coming down from Chester 
on Saturday to root against Chester. 



Armory To Be Used For Games 

At Home If Present Plans 

Are Carried Through 



Coach Dumschott announced this 
week that basketball practice would 
begin on a daily schedule in the arm- 
ory Monday. For the past two weeks, 
the courtmen have been having tri- 
weekly meeting. 

Veterans who have been reporting 
for these sessions are McNiff, Semela, 
Stevens, Kardash, Ruff, Lore and 
Brutz. 

Freshmen who have shown promise 
to be tabbed as prospects are Kleine, 
a six-foot one lad from Brooklyn, 
New York, where he has seen much 
action; Lentz, five-ten in height, son 
of the Army cage coach; Voith, of the 
same height, son of the cage official, 
and Tarr, a six-footer, all from Balti- 
more. Garner, also a six-footer who 
shows promise, hails from Catons- 
ville, 

The "Big Reds" season will open 
on December 16, with La Salle in 
Philadelphia, the first of a three-game 
pre-Christmas trip, for the Sho'men. 
Moravian will be played on December 
17 and Villanova on December 18. 

"Dutch" is negotiating for permis- 
sion to hold all home games in the 
armory although it has not yet been 
definitely granted. 

At the conclusion of the football 
season, such players from last year's 
■squad as Yerkes, Gibe, Benjamin, 
Kirby, Sinclair and Juliana will re- 
port for practice. 



Lew Yerkes, elusive triple-threat 
half-back for the Sho'men, well de- 
serves the honor this week. Just a 
Sophomore, Lew starred against the 
Juniata Indians, sparking his team- 
mates to an overwhelming triumph 
by virtue of two touchdowns and two 
extra-point conversions. To date, he 
has accumulated a total of twenty 
points which ranks him the second 
leading scorer in the state — Navy's 
Bill Busik leads him by four points 

Lew is a hard runner and, with 
four games remaining, he may finish 
among the leaders in the scoring race 



Meet Your Class Mates 

— at— 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



Do You Collect Neckties? 

It's a popular game on the 
campus. Add to your col- 
lection by writing the 
shopping service of 

HUTZLER BFOTHERS € 

Baltimore, Mti. 



5 Usilton's ij 

< Funeral Home, Inc. ;< 

J Phone 72 High St. J 

KS\SVkNV\S\\NNNNXN%\>>>>NNV-: 



CUMBERLAND COAL 
COMPANY 

Producers Wholesalers 

Retailers 

"Stokol" Stokers 

217 E. Redwood St. 
Baltimore, Maryland. 




Take Her 

Bowling 

Tonite ! 



Why not take her bowling on your date tonight? 
It is an enjoyable and inexpensive way to spend 
an evening, and in the clean, pleasant surround- 
ings of King Pin Alleys you can have a really 
fine time. Make bowling a recreation-habit — 
it will pay dividends in health and fun! 

Opens - Week Days 10 A. M 
Sundays 2 P. M. 

« « -8- 

We Cater To The 
College Students 



KING PIN BOWLING ALLEY 

Phone 499 for Reservations 







See 

OTIS 

For The HAIRCUT 





FOR THE ^Bgst IN 

Laundry Cleaning 

Pressing 

see 

JIM JULIANA 

Representing 

Park Cleaners 



S No Prizes Offered 
For Putting These 
Pieces Together... 



But if you do you'll get an idea of just one of the many services we offer to those 
who have advertising or printing problems. 

And it is no puzzle, either, why we print your own college paper, The Elm, year 
after year, the answer is service and cooperation plus fine workmanship. 

We'd like to have a try at that next printing job of yours. We have plenty of 
ideas for that next program or announcement. We'd even make a wager that 
you'll be more than satisfied. 




The Enterprise 

CHESTERTOWN PHONE 19 

— We Print — 

THE ELM — THE ALUMNUS 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



Sho'men Scalp Indians; 

Ready For PMC Game 



>dets Will Put Strong Veteran 

Eleven On Field; Sho'men 

Seek Third Victory 



by John Kardash 
Tomorrow, the Sho'men, victoriou 
ivcr :i woefully weak Juniata eleven 
:e the P. M. C. Cadets from Ches- 
, Pa. The Ekaitismen will seek to 
i?enge last year's 6-0 defeat at the 
lamls of the Cadets. 
"Si" Pauxtis, head football mentor 
t P. M. C, aided by Edmund Cramp, 
ormer Ail-American center who 
layed for P. M. C, and Robert Mc- 
[amara, a star guard while playing 
• the U. of Penn, invade Kibler 
kid to shatter the Sho'men's one- 
me winning streak. P. M. C. has 
n from Blue Ridge and Lebanon 
fallcy and lost to N. Y. U., Dela- 
, and West Chester, a trio of 
trong teams. 

J . M. C. Captain At Center 
Captain "Babe" Dignozio heads the 
)adets and will play at center. Play- 
g at both sides of Dignozio are 
Ihavles Schiavo and George Orsini 
the guard positions. At tackles 
re Bob Watkins, a Senior, and Wes- 
y Smith. Horace Russo, a scrappy 
;tle player, and George Wilkens will 
o the pass receiving for the Cadets. 
The backfield will be the strongest 
ection of the team as there are 
reive veterans returning from last 
ear's squad. The starting backfield 
fill be San Lapolla at quarterback, 
IdiJie Piff and Leroy Miller taking 
are of halfback duties with Bucky 
laitnett at fullback. Bill Nurthen, 
transfer from the mid-west, and 
tartholomeo, Junior, are reserve 
neks who will see their share of ac- 
m. 

Juliana Shifted To Quarterback 

There are several changes in the 
foo'men lineup. Coach Ekaitis, to 
ghten the burden on Lew "Yerkes, 
as elected Jim Juliana to take care 
f the signal-calling chores. The 
ther change finds Walt Brandt re- 
lacing Gene Messick in the number 
our spot in the starting lineup. Aside 
:om these alterations, the Sho'men 
ntact. Bill Benjamin and Bill 
■oil are at the end positions. Abner 
■eidy and Ray Sinclair are in the 

ekle spots. Frank Gibe and Ray 
■irby, at guards, and Al Dudderar at 
enter. Macielag and Lew Yerkes 
11 out the starting backfield. 

The Sho'men gridders will fare bet- 
er tomorrow if they concentrate on 
sizing all scoring chances and think 
ss about their opposition. Another 
actor which is also well to bear in 
n'nd is to forget last week's victory, 
pdeed, it was a well-deserved trium- 
b but Juniata furnished little opposi- 
lon. A good offense is a good de- 
mise and if the Ekaitismen heed this 
tying, they will subdue even the 
tfongest of foes. 




The .victorious Sho'men became so 
enthused after their 26-0 game with 
Juniata that Coach Ekaitis' hat was 

natched from his head and torn to 

ibbons. 



SIDELINES 



The Sho'men invasion of the Juni- 
ata Indians' wigwam turned out to 
be a scalping — yes, but the Indians 
were scalped this time. 

Frank Gibe's defensive work was 
as sturdy as the Rock of Gibraltar. 
The Gibber is a stellar performer on 
the line. 

Here's a vote for the most pleasant 
surprise this season which was — 
Washington 26 - Juniata! 



Sho'man Third-Stringers 

Face High School Today 

The third string of the Sho'men 
eleven will meet the high school team 
in a practice tilt this afternoon. Odds 
are on the college eleven. 



Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Phone 132W 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

Service 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 




For that 



"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

Leed S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



Indians Offer Little Resistance 

To Strong Maroon 

Offensive 



The Ekaitismen for the third c 
;ecutive year, scalped the Juniata In- 
Jians at Huntington, Pa. The Sho'- 
men displayed a formidable defense 
md a set of fast backs who ran the 
ball to the pay-off station on four oc- 
casions. Lew Yerkes, shifty and 
elusive as ever sparked the Sho'men 
by scoring two touchdowns and two 
conversions. Frank Gibe, Al Dudder- 
ar and Ray Kirhy shared the lime- 
light on the Maroon line. 

Juniata kicked off to. start the fire 
works and Macielag, who received the 
ball, fumbled on his own thirty-five 
line Juniata recovering. The Sho'- 
men line held the Indians on the first 
four plays': Immediately afterwards, 
the Maroons launched a scoring drive. 
Yerkes and Brandt alternated in car- 
rying the ball, with Juliana adding a 
fifteen yard gain on a deep reverse 
until Yerkes scored from the three 
yard mark for the first tally. The 
extra point was wide. 

Touchdown Called Back 

Washington booted to Juniata and 
then took the ball in mid-field after 
holding and forcing a kick. Brandt, 
after another goal line drive was 
launched, went over from the four- 
yard line, only to have the play call- 
ed back and a 15-yard penalty in- 
flicted for illegal use of hands. 
■ In the second quarter, the Ekaitis- 



men in Indian territory all the time 
countered again when Yerkes dashed 
IS yards to cross the goal line. The 
extra point was missed for the second 
time. 

Yerkes Quick-Kicks 

In the third quarter, Yerkes sur- 
prised the enemy by a quick kick that 
went out of bounds inside Juniata's 
ten-yard line. When the Indians tri- 
ed to punt out of danger from the 
fourteen-yard stripe, Ray Kirby, 
work-horse of the Sho'men line, broke 
through to block the kick and in soc- 
cer-like fashion, chased it across the 
goal line for a score. Yerkes con- 
verted the extra point from place- 
ment. A little later, after a 70-yard 
drive, Messick, hard charging half- 
back, bucked over from the 5-yard 
mark. Yerkes again kicked the ex- 
tra point. 

In the final period the Sho'men 
second team played and near.y added 
to their total score when Brandt toss- 
ed a thirty-yard heave to Warther 
near the scoring territory. But a 
fumble ended a possible score. 



STATE PREDICTIONS 



▼ 

Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

▲ 



The . 
Stam Drug Co. 

Chestertown 

Is Proud of Its 
Important Part 

In The Life 
of Your College 



For years this Drug Store has 
been the prescription store for 
Washington College students. 
This in itself is an honor and 
we are proud of the confidence 
your college physician has 
placed in our ability to capably 
fill your prescriptions. 

We also specialize in: 
WHITMAN'S CANDY SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

COSMETICS GIFT CARDS 

COMPLETE LINE OF MAGAZINES 

We Invite Your Patronage 



High Street Phone 3< 



Navy - Penn 7. 

Maryland 13 - Rutgers 7. 

W. Maryland - Bucknell 19. 

Johns Hopttins - Susquehanna 20. 

Mt. St. Mary's - Delaware 13. 

Washington 6 - P. M. C. 14. 

Blue Ridge 6 - Lebanon Valley 13. 



Churchill 

"The House Of Hil." 
CHURCH HILL . PHONE 2391 
Parking Room Galore 



SAT., MON., TUES., WED. 
NOVEMBER 1-3-4-5 




STAN 



LAUREL; HARDY 

GUMS 

Sheila Byan W -' Dick Helson 
Edmund MacDonald 

A 20ih C.niury-r« rMt» 



THUR., FRI., NOV. 6 - 7 



oohhhh/./v 
0<ANE SETS KISSEDI 

. . . and discovers the 
magic of moonlight and 




AVERY 
WuNGLAW 



NANCY KELLY • JOHN SUTTON 

ond IANET BEECHER • RICHARD 
CLAYTON • JUNE CARLSON 



A 20th Cnlurr-Foi rktur 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1941 



Who's Who Q£ Washin 9 ton College 



David Bnrtotini 
Senior — Kappa Alpha 

President of Kappa Alpha 4; Pres- 
ident of Class 1, 2, 3, 4; President of 
Students' A. A. 4; Member of ODK, 
4; Member of Varsity Club, 3, 4; 
Letterman in football and track; In- 
ter-fraternity Council, 4; Dramatic 
Club 2, 3, 4; Historical Society 2, 3. 



Basil Clark 
Senior — Lambda Chi Alpha 
Secretary Lambda Chi Alpha 3; 
President 4; Student Council 4; Ten- 
nis 2, 3; Letterman 3; Y. M. C. A. 1, 

2. 3, 4; Sargeant-at-Arms 2; Inter- 
fraternity Council 4; Mt. Vernon Lit- 
erary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Intra-mural 
basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; NY A Student 
Administrator 3, 4; Pegasus Staff, 2, 

3, 4; Activities Editor 4. 



Lloyd Davis 
Senior — Theta Chi 

President of Theta Chi 4; Business 
Manager Pegasus 4; Member of ODK 
4; Vice-President of Class 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Vice-President of Dramatic Club 3, 
4; Merit Scholarship; Member Publi- 
cations Board. 



Rufut Johnson 
Senior — Kappa Alpha 
Treasurer of Kappa Alpha 3; Sec- 
retary 4; Visitors and Governors 
Scholarship 4; Vice-President of ODK 
4; Business Staff of ELM 1, 2, 3, 4 
Circulation Manager 2; Business 
Manager 3, 4; Debate Club Presi 
dent 3; Business Manager 2; Inter 
collegiate Debater 1, 2, 3; Rogers De- 



bating Award; Member of Sigma Sig-| dent 4; Member of ODK 2, 3, 4; Pres- 
ma Omicron 3, 4; Distinguished ident 4; Interfraternity Council 3, 4; 
Scholarship; Board of Student Publi- Member Society of Science 4; Glee 
cations 3, 4; Student Council Memberj Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Board of Publiea- 
2; Member Mt. Vernon Literary tions 3; Secretary 4; Basketball 3, 4- 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



Society. 



J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 
Senior — Kappa Alpha 
ELM Staff 1, 2, 3, 4; Feature Edi- 
r 2; Assistant Editor 3; Editor-in- 
Chief 4; Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Publicity Manager 3; President 4; 
Editor-in-Chief of College Handbook 
3, 4; Head of Dormitory 3; Washing- 
ton College Publicity Bureau 3, 4; 
Chief of Staff 3; Intra-Mural Basket- 
ball and Softball Official 1, 2, 3; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2; Publicity Manager 2; 
Board of Student Publications 4; 
Senatorial Scholarship 3, 4; Track 2; 
Cheerleader 1; Beta Omega News 3, 
4; Assistant Editor 3; Editor-in-Chief 
4. 



Baseball 2, 3, 4. 



Albert Lee Mooney 
Junior — Theta Chi 
Theta Chi 1, 2, 3; Treasurer 3; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Society of Sciences 
1, 2, 3; Treasurer 3; O. D. K. 3; 
Treasurer 3; Student Council 3; Sec- 
retary 3; Chemistry Lab Assistant 2, 
3; Distinguished in Scholarship, Win- 
ner of Simmons Medal 1. 



A. Rayfield Kirby 
Senior — Kappa Alpha 

Kappa Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; No. IX, 3; 
No. VII, 4; Student Council 3, 4; 
President 4; Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Secretary 3; Football 1, 2, 3, 4;* Let- 
terman, All-Maryland 3; Co-Captain 
4; Basketball 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2, 3; 
Letterman. 



Harry E. Lore, Jr. 
Senior — Theta Chi 

Theta Chi 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 3 
Marshal 4; Student Council 2, 3, 4 
Secretary-Treasurer 3 ; Vice-Presi 



Dean Asks Elm 
For Complete 
Stacks Story 

(Continued from Page 1) 
like to browse around occasionally to 
see what's new in the Library." 

"I hope the stacks are soon open," 
stated Phil Souder. "I think it's un- 
fair. Everyone is suffering because 
of a few who couldn't behave them 
selves." 

"I think it's terrible. It deprives 
people of their educational opportuni- 
ties that they would otherwise en- 
joy," boldly asserted a Freshman girl 
after disclosing that she had never 
been in the stacks but once. 

"Open the stacks and give them 
another chance," was the opinion of 
one Junior, who owned up to the fact 
thnt he had not been in the stacks 
this year. 

"It*s lousy," says Rudy Parks. "It's 
inconvenienced me greatly. When I 
want to go look for a book, I like to 
browse around and look for it. 

"I have received no inconvenience 
because I asked permission," replied 
Tom Eliason. "However, I think the 
stacks should be opened, if people use 
them for their intended purpose. 

All of those interviewed thought it 
was entirely unfair to'the rest of the 
students. All felt that closed stack 
was decidedly a disadvantage after 
having been trained in the use of op- 
en stacks in the new Library. 




(Continued from Page 2) 

dominate the news and I would like to 
ask those "brave" people who wrote 
that letter just why they shouldn't. 
According to statistics, over half the 
clubs on this campus have KA presi- 
dents. Eight men on the starting 
lineup of the Sho'men are KA's not to 
mention the co-captains and the only 
All-Maryland player. 

It doesn't take any "guts" to write 
a letter like the one issued last week, 
but it takes a great deal more to sign 
one's name to it. 

Jim Stevens. 



Donald Smith 
Senior — Lambda Chi Alpha 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; High 
Tau 3; High Beta 4; Pegasus Staff 
Member 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant Edito: 
3; Editor 4; Member of Society of 
Science 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary 3; Inter- 
fraternity Council 3, 4 ; Secretary- 
Treasurer 3; President 4; Tennis 2, 
3; Letterman 3; Mt. Vernon Literal'; 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Lab As 
sistant 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; 
rntramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. 



MON. - TUES. - WED., NOV. 3-4-5 

—FOUR SPARKLING FUN-MAKERS— 

ROSALIND RUSSELL - DON AMECHE 

KAY FRANCIS - VAN HEFLIN 

— in — 

"THE FEMININE TOUCH" 

Miss Liberty is a Woman but even she 
carries a TORCH. Hollywood's gayest ga- 
laxy of fun-makers in the romantic laugh- 
hit of the year. 
— _A FIRST RUN PREMIER— 

THUR. - FRI. - SAT., NOV. 6-7-8 

— Big Double Feature Attraction — 

THE THREE MESQUITEERS 

"GANGS^F SONORA" 

—Plus 

"FLYING CADETS" 

— with — 

WM. GARGAN - EDMUND LOWE 

PEGGY MORAN - FRANK ALBERTSON 



—NEXT WEEK — 
Charles Boyer and Margaret Sullavan 



"APPOINTMENT FOR LOVE" 



ADRIINNE AMES 

(star of stage, screen and radio) vlilfi 
many training camps in her job as 
Chairman of the Entertainment Com- 
mittee of the Home legion. A carton 
ef Chesterfields is o mighty welcome 
fift for the men in camp. 



M 







A. S. TURNER & SONS 

The Firestone Store 

—SPORTING GOODS— 

Tennis Racquets, Tennis Balls, Footballs, Basketballs, 

Flashlight Batteries, Electric Light Bulbs 

FILL UP WITH GOOD GULF GASOLINE HERE 

High Street 






* FoHow fhe lead of Adrienne Ames and send 
/ the men in the camps the cigarette that's 
C Definitely MILDER and BETTER-TASTING 

Zj^fyf Everything about Chesterfield 

***«&V7 ' s made for your pleasure and conve- 
**%> nience . . . from their fine, rightly blended 
tobaccos to their easy-to-open cello- 
phane jacket that keeps Chesterfield 
always Fresher and Cooler-Smoking. 

Buy a pack and try them. 

You're sure to like Ihem because the 

big thing that's pushing Chesterfield 

■j ahead all over the country is the 

$ approval of smokers like yourself. 

f 

' EVERYWHERE YOU GO 



mi 




NEW6 irv 
S RIE.F. . . . 

Svec Named Chairman 

James Svec was elected temporary 
hairman of the Freshman Class yes- 
jiday afternoon. Robert Horsfield 
L s the runner-up in a very close 
Svec is a graduate of Poly- 
Echnic Institute of Baltimore. 
No definite date has been set for 
hu ictfulnr Freshman elections, which 
be held sometime after marks 
c out in February. 



Date Set For Tie-Up 

Tin 1 Freshman-Sophomore "Tie 
fp" and "Tug-of-Wai" will be held 
[oilday, November 24, and the foot- 
mil Riime will be played y Tuesday, 
rovember 25, the Freshman Activi- 
sts Committee announced at this 
peek's Student Council Meeting. 



Historians Plan Trip 

The Historical Society voted on 
Wednesday, in favor of a trip to An- 
lapolis between the Thanksgiving 

id Christmas holidays. The trip is 
chcduled to leave Sunday morning, 

aking a tour of the State House 
iinl the Naval Academy. It is not 

stricted to members of the club. 

The possibility of presenting a his- 
oiicul motion picture was discussed 
s a project for the Tercentary cele- 
ration of the Eastern Shore this 

miner. 



"V" 



lbe 




JlMUI 



"V" 



Vol. XLI. No. 8. WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD„ FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1941 Price Five Cents 



Bird Sketches 
To Be Shown 
By Scientists 

34 Original Arctic Drawings 

By Dr. Sutton Of Cornell 

To Be Here In Dec. 



Bus Route Defeated 

Mayor Philip Wilmer has charged 
hat the Pennsylvania Railroad was 
lying to "double-cross" the people 
if Chestertown in connection with 
he proposed abandonment of the 
ocal passenger train and the estab- 
[shraent of a bus line. No mention 
if the proposed bus line was made in 
ipplication for permission to remove 
[the Bullett." 

Due to the fact that several Kent 
Jounty businesses would be vitally af- 
ected by the removal of the train 
ervice, the Chestertown Business 
Jen's Association notified the Public 
Service Commission that they oppos- 
:d the plan. 



Fall Play To Be Dec. 5 

"Smilin' Through" the initial per- 
"ormance of the Washington Players 
>e presented on Friday, Decem- 
er 5. The schedule for the rest of 
lub's activities has only been 
idopted te nip ora rally. It will in- 
Jutio more activities than last year, 
fever. The interclass, plays for 
vhich there is a plaque awarded to 
he winner, are to be revived through 
he cooperation of the class presi- 
Also in the year's schedule 
ill be a group of one-act plays to be 
[iven by visiting groups. The other 
hree-act plays have not yet been 
ihoseu. 



Peabody Artists Due 

Miss Thelma Viol, contralto, and 
'liss Martha Svendsen, pianist of 
eabody Conservatory of Music, Bal- 
iinove, will perform at the assembly 
xt week, according to Mr. Good- 
n. This announcement is to cor- 
ect the erroneous announcement 
le last week. 



Navy Man Shows Movies 

Lieutenant-Commander Myron A. 
iofer, Senior member of the Naval 
Aviation Cadet Selection Board, vis- 
'ed the College yesterday afternoon. 
He spoke briefly concerning naval 
aviation as a career for college men 
a "d showed a short sound picture 
'tied "Eyes of the Navy." 



Son Born To Alumna 

son was born to Mrs. Margaret 
Crowthers and Mr. Crowthers recent- 
ly. Mrs. Crowthers was formerly 
Margaret Jefferson, class of '29 and 
Mr, Crowthers a former member of 
the athletic department of Washing- 
ton College. 



Thirty-four original water color 
sketches of Arctic birds and animals 
will be displayed under the auspices 
of the Society of Science in the mus- 
eum room of the Bunting Library 
during December. 

These sketches, the work of Dr. 
George M. Sutton, Curator of Birds, 
Cornell University, will be the topic 
of a talk by Dr. Corrington, who is 
also a Cornell man, when the exhibit 
is opened at the December 3 meeting 
of the Society, according to James 
Diacumakos, president. 

Dr. Sutton, ornithologist, artist, 
author, lecturer, and explorer, paint- 
ed the sketches to be shown while he 
was living for a year among the eski- 
mos of Southampton Island in Hud- 
son Bay, just south of the arctic cir- 
cle. He made a complete study of 
the flora and fauna of that northern 
island as his doctoral thesis at Cor- 
nell some years ago. 

Today Dr. Sutton is considered one 
of the greatest bird artists. A pho- 
tograph of him working over one of 
his paintings was published in a re- 
cent Collegiate Digest, distributed 
ith The Elm. He studied under the 
late Louis Agassix Euertes, whose 
studio at Cornell he now uses. 

He has recorded his arctic experi- 
ences in "Eskimo Year" and many 
other of his ornithological adventures 
in "Birds In The Wilderness." He 

o enjoys the distinction of having 
the only new species of bird discov- 
ered in the United States during the 
past twenty-five years named after 
him. Sutton's warbler, as it is call- 
ed, was found by a student of his 
when bird-hunting in West Virginia 
not far from the Maryland line. 

This exhibit is only one of a ser- 
ies to he sponsored by various stu- 
dent organizations, according to the 
plans of the faculty museum commit- 
tee for the coming year. 



Outlook Hopeful 
For Burkholder 



Sees Present World Situation 
As Impermanent 



E. Paul Burkholder, Supervisor of 
Rural Schools for the State of Dela- 
ware, spoke on the impermanence of 
the present world situation at the 
assembly meeting on Thursday. The 
first half hour of the program Mr. 
Burkholder spent in comparing the 
announcements made at the begin- 
ning of assembly to those made in 
kindergarten and grammar school 
and in telling jokes. 

The main body of the speech was 
more serious, however, and on an 
optimistic level. He pointed out that 
throughout the history of the world 
there have been wars and depres- 
sions, — that there is a definite cycle 
around which governments revolve. 
He showed that as is said in the Bible 
"the evening and the morning," a 
dawn of greater realization follows 
every time of strife. He prophesied 
that we would have a better world in 
which to live our lives after college, 
and urged that each of us take ad- 
vantage of the opportunities offered 
us here. 



$84.49 Raised 


For Red Cross 


A total of $84.49 was col- 


lected in the Red Cross drive 


held this week. Of this, the 


faculty gave $36.00, and the 


students gave $48.49. 


The Freshman came through 


with the highest donation, giv- 


ing $10.00. The Senior* ran a 


close second with $9.90. The 


Juniors fell below them all, col- 


lecting only $7.78. The soror- 


ities and fraternities gave a i 


total of $12.00. 



1942 Pegasus 
To Be Informal 

Editor Attempting To Show 
Students In Real Life 



Elm Will Sponsor 
All-College Night 
On Cabaret Theme 



Inducted In Naval Reserve 




Popularity Contest, Mead's 

Orchestra, Floor Show 

To Be Featured 



Plans for the 1942 Pegasus call for 
an entirely different yearbook in 
theme and arrangement according tn 
Donald Smith, the editor. Editor 
Smith stated emphatically, "The Peg- 
asus will be completely changed this 
year. In fact it might be said that 
it will go from one extreme to anoth- 
er." / 

In general the yearbook staff will 
try to show in the annual the student 
as is actually remembered at Wash- 
ington College. "We are getting a- 
way from the formality that has been 
prevalent in past years," Smith ex- 
plained. 

This idea was carried through this 
week in the pictures taken by Paul 
Gendler, yearbook photographer of 
Merin-Baliban, of the seniors. All 
seniors were photographed in infor- 
mal poses at Hodson Hall, Keid Hall, 
or the "Bunting Library. 

In contrast to the informal senior 
pictures, fraternity and sorority pic- 
tures were more or less formal. 
Frcternity men were posed in a sum- 
mer formal coat. At the suggestion 
of a coed staff member, Smith chang- 
ed his original plans for sorority pic- 




James S. Spielman 

James S. Spielman, '41, winner of 
the Gold Pentagon and past editor of 
the ELM was inducted into the Unit- 
ed States Naval Reserve Corps this 
week. Spielman will begin his pre- 
liminary training in January. 



tures from the formal drape to a 
white silk blouse and pearls. The 
girls liked the arrangement greatly. 

Organization pictures will be taken 
wherever possible with informal set- 
tings such as the Hodson Hall lounge. 
Action shots will enliven the sports 
section. Candid snapshots will be an 
outstanding feature of this year's 
Pegasus. Smith said, "Don't be sur- 
prised if you're caught in a "smooch- 
ing" act. It's all a part of college 
life." 



Sixty Hear Dr. Buxton Speak 

On Petroleum At Science Meet 



Talk Is One Of Series In Schedule Of Society Of Science; 
Students And Faculty Attend 



The petroleum industry, its devel- 
opment and importance, constituted 
the basis of Dr. Buxton's talk to the 
Society of Sciences Wednesday night 
in the Dunning Science Building. 

Dr. Buxton's talk included the his- 
tory of the development of the pe- 
troleum industry, its relative import- 
ance as compared with the coal tar 
industry, the types of hydrocarbons, 
and the leading by-products of pe- 
troleum distillation. 

This talk was given before a group 
of sixty-odd students and faculty 
members and witfes. This was one of 
the largest groups ever present at a 
meeting of the Science Society, Pres- 
ident Diacumakos asserted. Dr. 
Buxton's talk was one of a series of 
informative talks embracing the sci- 
ences which Diacumakos has schedul- 
ed. 

Dr. Burton first commented on the 
development of the petroleum indus- 
try since ancient times; from 1S50- 
1910, and from 1910 to the present 
day. He then stressed the fact that 



although the coal tar industry is more 
widely known by the general public, 
the petroleum industry is fully im- 
portant. 

Dr. Buxton then went into some de- 
tail of the processes of the petroleum 
industry. He enumerated the types 
of hydrocarbons: straight chain, ring, 
and unsaturated. The "cracking" 
process was then described in some 
detail; the temperature of and pres- 
sure on the crude oil are both in- 
creased, so that the hydrocarbons are 
lowered. These resultant hydrocar- 
bons, less complex in form, are the 
type found in gasoline. 

The utilization of the cracked gas- 
es, among which are acetone, ethyl 
chloride, tetra-ethyl lead, and ethy- 
lene glycol, was then covered by Dr. 
Buxton. 

Dr. Buxton also covered the sub- 
jects of high octane gasoline and its 
various reactions, butyl rubber and 
its uses, aromatic hydrocarbons, 
toluene and glycerine, the latter use- 
ful in making nitroglycerine. 



Dr. Livingood, as chairman 
of the Faculty Committee on 
Student Activities, gave his of- 
ficial consent to the ELM at 
noon today to sponsor an All- 
College Night on Saturday, No- 
vember 29, the first Saturday 
following Thanksgiving Recess. 
Calvert Jones, chairman of the 
Steering Committee announced 
that work for the gala evening 
would begin immediately. 

All-College Night, designed 
to give the college students 
something new and different in 
entertainment, is being spon- 
sored by the ELM with the co- 
operation of many of the cam- 
pus leaders. Approximately 
fifteen of these leaders ex- 
pressed their approval of the 
plans last night at a meeting in 
the ELM office when they con- 
sented to serve as chairmen of 
the numerous committees. 

To Have Night Club Theme 
Everything from a floor show down 
to a (Cocoa-Cola) bar and cigarette 
girls will aid in carrying out the 
"night club" theme. For the small 
cover charge of fifty cents, patrons 
will receive a reserved table and four 
hours of solid entertainment. 

The orchestra will furnish one of 
the highlights of the evening, for it 
will be the debut of Francis Mead 
and his orchestra on the Washington 
College campus. The floor show, 
which will replace the usual intermis- 
sion, will consist of campus talent. It 
is under the direction of Francis 
Mead. 

Popularity Contest Announced 
The main attraction of the evening 
will be the announcement and corona- 
tion of the boy and girl of the cam- 
pus chosen as most popular. The 
election will be worked through a 
vote of the entire student body. Next 
week, in the ELM, a nomination bal- 
lot will be inserted. Each student 
will be asked to write in the names 
of the boy and girl he wishes to nom- 
inate. The following week, students 
will vote by secret ballot in the ELM 
office, on one of the tbree boys and 
three girls receiving the highest num- 
ber of nominating votes. 

Chairmen Selected 
These committees were named: 
Steering — Calvert Jones; Finance 
and Refreshments, Rufus Johnson; 
Orchestra and Floor Show, Francis 
Mead; Decorations, Sara Blackwood 
and Jean Leland; Popularity Con- 
test, Dave Bartolini; Coronation, El- 
len Peters; Speaker for Coronation, 
Minor Steele; Chaperons, Basil Clark; 
Bar, Lloyd Davis; Tickets and Table 
Plan, Jim Stevens; Tables, Ray Kir- 
by; Publicity, Harry Lore; Lights, Ed 
Palder; Presents for Winners, Mary 
Liz Humphries; and Cloak Rooms, 
Jimmy Dougherty. 

Another meeting of the committee 
chairmen will be held Tuesday even- 
ing in the ELM office. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 194] 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published 
will not be published if confidence is requested 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 
Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor - Jo hn Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



Names 
Letters to the 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1941 



Desk Editor 

Assistants — Blackwood, E. 



Paii'is 
Peters 



Going, Going — Gone? 

The abandonment of old customs and traditions is indeed 
hard. It is with great sadness, therefore, that we announce the 
death of the Pep Meeting. Sinking slowly for years, this great 
tradition breathed its last on Friday night, October 31, at 7:30. 
Dr. Wilbert Patterson strove in vain to keep alive the spark of 
life, but a will greater than his was the victor. 

Years ago the College acquired the habit of having a mass 
meeting of the students on the night before a football game. 
Freshmen would march about the campus "drumming out" the 
upperclassmen. Everyone congregated in the Gymnasium. 
The coach and various members of the team usually said a few 
words about the coming game and speculated on the chance for 
victory- The student body united in songs and cheer; Fresh- 
men beat on tin cans. It was quite a glorious affair THEN ; but 
alas, this great tradition has passed — murdered by poor sup- 
port. 

Why Not Open House? 

The idea of an Open House has again been brought forth. 
Last year when the Theta Chi Fraternity wanted to hold Open 
House, special permission was needed. The arguments against 
it were that the fraternities had no adequate equipment and no 
chaperons. 

As to the question of facilities ; the Theta Chi's managed to 
do a creditable job of serving refreshments. The fraternities 
could probably use the Reid Hall or Hodson Hall kitchens; the 
sororities have a Pan-hellenic kitchen. 

This leaves only the matter of chaperons. The faculty ad 
visors and the patronesses expect to assume a certain responsi 
bility when they accept their bids to the groups, so it should not 
come as an imposition on them to act as chaperons. Either 
there could be a joint Open House, or each group might have its 
individually. 

This would be one thing in which we could each take 
active part in our effort to establish inter-fraternity spirit. 



Gym Classes Get Tough 

Coach Tom Kibler announced at the beginning of the year 
that a more intensified program for physical education classes 
would be inaugurated. It is not too early to say that this new 
system of drills, calisthencics, and game is proving quite suc- 
cessful. The general enthusiasm of the classes is evidence of 
its balance and novelty. Muscle-building exercises are supple- 
mented by "tricky" Scottish dances. In addition, basketball 
and other games are being played during every class. 

Under the direction of Coach Ekaitis the boys are learning 
to take orders quickly, are becoming more alert, and are really 
getting the exercise they need. Too many college men forget 
the importance of good health as a factor in success. A well 
rounded program of physical training is, therefore, just as es- 
sential to college education as books. 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



NO RTHEAST CORNER 

Dr. William Smith Speaks 
On Curriculum Of 1782 



Student Activities Budget 01 0. D. K. 

First Semester Of 1941-42 

Calculated on the basis of 300 students at $1.00 per student 
per semester. 

Pet. 

O. D. K 25% 

Publication Board 25% 

Dramatic Club 17% 

Debate Club 12% 



Orchestra 
Glee Club . 
Y. M. C. A. . . 
Student Council 



Reserve 



6% 

5% 
3% 
1% 


94'.:- 

6% 



Change 





2% 

2% 


—1% 
—2', 
—1% 



Cash 

S 75.00 
75.00 
51.00 
36.00 
18.00 
15.00 
9.00 
3.00 



§282.00 
18.00 



100% 

Submitted for approval on Oct. 13, 1941, 



by 



$300.00 



Rufus Johnson 
Albert Mooney 'thirty, 



If a nod of the week were offered 
for something other than being out- 
standing on the football field, it 
would probably go this week to the 
person who reported to one of the lo- 
cal ministers about the sins of the 
Reid Hall girls. It is reliably report- 
ed to us that the congregation prayed 
for the sinful girls of Reid Hall. 
Seems as though some of them smoke 
a bit too much . . . Then, of course, 
there's the one about giving the guy 
along side of you a hot foot when he 
goes to sleep in class. A better dis- 
turbance could not be wished for. 

Lucky Strikes have a novel form of 
advertising this year. Last year, it 
was records of Kay Kyser. This 
year, it's movies, with sound. Sam 
pies go with the show, too . . .Stu 
dents who read Dr. William Smith's 
article in reference to the studies of 
1782 certainly are unanimous in the 
act that they're glad this is 1941 
Can't say as we blame them. Ima- 
gine taking French as an extra-cur- 
cular activity . . . We had a long 
awaited pleasure last week when we 
ntroduced to Bill "Red" Burk 
It's always a pleasure to meet people 
about who you've heard so much. 
He's a past editor of the ELM, too. 

"Dutch" Smith, editor of the Peg 
asus, informs us that the book will be 
completely changed this year. Pres 
ent plans sound like we're going to 
have a bang-up year book. Another 
great improvement is the fact that it 
will come out ahead of time this year 
. . . Which reminds us, Frances Mead 
wants members of the student body 
to submit names for his band. An 
orchestra without a name may be 
something like a ship without a rud- 
der. Personally, we can't see any- 
thing wrong with calling them the 
Showmen. 

Ye editor certainly did fall down 
on the job last week. For the first 
time that we can remember, the ELM 
failed to meet it's deadline. Worst 
part of it is that we can't find a sin- 
gle soul but ourselves to blame it on 
. . . Beginning next week, the ELM is 
going to sponsor a contest to elect a 
Mr. and Mrs. Washington College. 
Nominations will be the first thing on 
the program so be thinking of the 
people you're going to nominate. 

We stopped in to hear Frances 
Mead and his orchestra practice the 
other night. It was just four weeks 
since we had heard the first practice 
of this same group of students. What 
long way they have come. In our 
humble opinion, they are good and if 
their improvement continues the way 
it has, college students will not be 
want of an orchestra. These fifteen 
or sixteen people are working hard 
and giving much of their time for 
something that will benefit everyone 
else much more than it will benefit 
them. Truly, they deserve a vote of 
thanks from the student body. 

Coach Dumschott has a novel way 
of getting the eourtmen to work out. 
The requirements for basketball prac- 
tice this year are to walk to and from 
the armory every day. Wonder 
what Pickles would do if he had to 
walk down there with that man on his 
back . . . Student Council over in 
Reid Hal) certainly has tightened 
down . . . The ELM is proud to an- 
nounce that Big Jim Stevens has been 
added to the staff as Jitterbug editor 
- . . With this, we say, so long and 



by William Smith, Founder 

In the first place (this is in 1782. 
you understand), there is no choice 
of subjects. If you don't expect to 
take the same things as everyone else 
in your class, and at the same time, 
you don't come to college here. If 
you'd rather go somewhere else, it 
might be difficult, for William and 
Mary at Williamsburg is closed until 
the British are defeated, and the Col- 
lege of Philadelphia is having trou- 
ble with the Legislature and is tem- 
porarily suspended. There is no oth- 
er college nearer than Princeton, and 
the plan there is the same. 

The Freshmen will spend half the 
morning in Latin and English com- 
position, and the other half in Math- 
ematics. They spend the afternoon 
in reading Greek and Latin authors* 
In the year, they will cover Algebra, 
quadratic equations, six books of 
Euclid, and logarithams. Later in 
the year, after doing something else 
the Euclid is taken through the sec- 
ond time to make sure! 

Homer's Iliad is the first job ii: 
Freshman classics. Then Juvenal, 
Pindar, Cicero, Livy, Thucydides and 
Euripides. That is the reading cur- 
riculum for the tender Frosh "Dispu 
tation" and declamation gets slipped 
in somewhere as an extracurricular 
activity — under supervision. 

In 1782 there is no Sophomore 
year. Following the European cus- 
tom, (especially influenced by Aber- 
deen, from which the President of 
Washington College came), the course 
is comprised in three years. Follow- 
ing the Freshmen, therefore, comes 
the Junior class. This year we will 
all take Logic, Surveying, Navigation 
Conic Sections, Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry, the advanced books of 
Euclid, and the principles of Archi- 
tecture. Our afternoons will be giv- 



en to Latin and English Rhetoi 
Longinus, Horace, Aristotle' - P 
ami the orations of Cicero and De. 
mosthenes. On these latter authoi 
we will model the orations which t 
will deliver regularly. New subjeel 
this year are Moral and Natural Phij, 
osophy, under which we will stum 
Ethics in one period, and Hydrost* 
tics, Pneumatics, and Mechai 
Powers the other. 

In the Senior year, Ethics will l- 
continued, with Natural and CivE 
Law, and an introduction to Cm 
History, Laws, and Government! 
Trade and Commerce (all in one per. 
iod for the first term). We wilt havi 
Light and Colors, Optics, and P( 
spective for one term; followed by 
term of Astronomy and the Nutura 
History of Vegetables and Animali 
The last term will introduce us tj 
Chemistry, Fossils, and Agriculture 
Throughout this last year, advanced 
reading in Greek and Latin will 6 
continued, and with much compos 
tion and declamation. 

The printed curriculum of stuilie 
includes also a lengthy list of author 1 ; 
on various subjects, recommended fo 
collateral reading, and there is ; 
vision made for any who care to tab 
up the French Language in their lei: 
ure hours. 

This is the established course 
education at Washington College- 
no different from that elsewhere i 
the colonies and in the mother coun 
try. A final series of comprehe: 
examinations precede the granting o: 
the A. B. degree. 

This summary of the prospectus 
the College published at its foundi 
tion will seem unusual to our sue 
sors, perhaps, but it is the most 
vaneed scheme of education in 
colonies, and has the support of a! 
advanced educators in the Nei 
World. 



Where 
Were You? 



Reid Hall has again been invaded — 
this time by submarines — in the sand- 
wich form, mighty powerful, but not 
dangerous! We hear that birthdays 
sure are happy things to have — every- 
thing free and no strings attached! 
Francis Mead is looking for a name 
for the new band, so any suggestion 
will be welcome. What about the 
Sho'men? Just to give you an idea. 
An idea for what to do on Friday 
nights on dates — go to the town 
trials, for they're fun and mighty re- 
vealing! 

Economics 1 must be super-dumb, 
cause Frank deserted the ship the 
other dav with appropriate remarks 



— do you think he could have beffl 
mad? Were you in your own clas 
picture? Speaking of pictures, tb 
idea for informal Senior shots i 
good one, and should bring the 
book more up-to-date. 

The "Welcome Alumni", on 
sacred "L" will be there 'till 
homecoming at this rate — still, 
that old friendly spirit all year rouni 
No one can complain of lack o 
lege spirit from the turnout there tf- 
for last week's game, mud, rail 
what have you. But we do thin 
that the "pep" meeting lacked whi 
its name implies it should have. AboE 
that Bulletin Board in "Bill" Smit 
Hall. Some of the notices have bi 
there since college opened, and 
find the latest you have to pour o' 
the entire list — about house cleanin 
time, I betcha! Dr. Tolles had so 
of his old class back the other i 
for Novel — Charlie and Ed Miller, 
the conversation never lagged. 



Tlownbeat 



Hi gates! Are ya hep to the step 
— alive to the jive — a solid sender? 
Well all right then, let's go! 

Thursday night at the Chestertown 
Armory there will be a Vaudeville 
Show sponsored by the Country Fair 
Committee. One of the high lights 
of the show will be an act with a few 
of the "hell cats" from Washington 
College taking part. To the music 
of a well known recording — "Wood- 
chopper's Ball" — these Jitterbugs will 



try to knock themselves out. 

The following couples will danc 
Dian Hubbard and Hal Martin; Bel 
Lohmuller and Bill Nagler; Joan Co 
nors and Jim Stevens. These st 
dents will try to help out in wh 
they think will be for a very wortl 
cause. The money that is made * 
go to the Kent and Queen Ann' 
County Hospital Fund. 

Other features of the evening ^ 
be an army exhibit, farm exhibit, R 1 
Cross exhibit, and a flower show sp° 
sored by the Garden Club of Ch* 
tertown. 

How's about ya students com 11 
down and cheering on your fe" ( 
gates and enjoying an evening ot 5- 
entertainment? 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Choose 



Hochschild, Kohn & Co. 

for correct 

Campus and College Wear 



MACK'S 

RADIO 

SHOP 
Kent News Building 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



Pegasus Photographer Finds 

Good Staff And Friends Here 



Year Book Specialist Returns 
For Seventh Year 



WONG LEE 

CHINESE 
LAUNDRY 

317 Cannon St. 
Chestertown, Md. 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 


Everything Needed 


for 


Building 



i Usilton's % 

'i. Funeral Home, Inc. g 
C $ 

i Phone 72 High St. • 

/ * 

: A\\W\\\%\%XNXX\X\XXNNX v : 



"The students of Washington Col 
lege are more like friends than stu- 
dents to me," Mr. Paul Gendler, Pep- 
asus photographer, said to an .Elm 
reporter as he answered questions be- 
tween pictures. He added that he 
liked to work in small schools, be- 
cause the students are more friendly 
and give more co-operation. 

Some of the problems photograph- 
ers have to cope with were demon- 
strated by a few incidents that oc- 
curred during the interview. "Doc" 
Slade demonstrated what the best- 
dressed football player of 1942 would 
wear. From the waist up he was at- 
tired in a summer formal coat, which 
clashed slightly with his football 
pants. It was also quite a struggle 
to get Frank Evans in and out of the 
one formal coat Mr. Gendler had. 

The other colleges which Mr. Gend- 
ler, who specializes in college year 
book pictures, has on his schedule are 
Dickinson, Juniata, Richmond, Em- 
ory, Maryland Dental School, John 
Hopkins University, American Uni- 
versity, and Georgetown Medical, 
Dental, and Nurses' College. Mr. 
Gendler says that he has always en- 
joyed his stay here at Washington 
College in the six or seven years he 
has been working with the Pegasus 
staff. 

Mr. Gendler says that college stu- 
dents, as a rule, are good photo- 
graphic subjects. He says that the 
sophomore class as a group are the 
most trouble to photograph. 

Noting the work of several editor- 
ial assistants, Mr-. Gendler added, 
'The Pegasus staff is much better 
than formerly." 



See 

OTIS 

For The HAIRCUT 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



Meet Your Class Mates 

—at— 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber, Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone 5 



With The 



Greeks 



Kappa Alpha 

Dave Bartolini, Al Dudderar, and 
Rufus Johnson, visited at the latter's 
home Saturday and Sunday. After 
a hearty 'coon dinner Saturday even- 
ing, the boys set out to refill the 
table for breakfast. Due to "a moon- 
light night and excessive wind" how- 
ever, as Brother Johnson phrased it, 
the 'coons were too few and far be- 
tween for the boys. 



Music Records 
Put In Library 

Seven folios and five albums of 
classical and semi-classical music 
have been placed in the library by 
Miss Russell, to whom some of them 
belong. 

Although primarily for use in Miss 
Russell's music classes, the record: 
may be taken out by anyone for two 
hours at a time with her consent. 

Mr. Boisen purchased a group of 
albums last year and deposited them 
in the library. These included works 
<)f Bach, Haydn, and De Falla. Miss 
Russell then augmented these with 
records of music of Wagner, Franck, 
Brahms, and Beethoven. All have 
been indexed; more are to be pu: 
chased this year. If it is decided to 
accept an offer made by a large firm. 
Mr. Coleman stated, twenty-five or 
thirty new records will be added. 

At present, the collection includes 
six folios, five albums, and a folio of 
Beethoven's "Eroica" Symphony. 
Most of them are Victor, Bluebird, 
and Decca records. 

Climaxing the library's repertoire 
is a new Victor seven record folio of 
the complete "Eroica" Symphony, re- 
corded by Arturo Toscanini and the 
N. B. C. Symphony Orchestra. 



6 Interesting Titles 

Listed Among New Books 

Among the new books to be intro- 
duced in the Library this week will be 
found several that should be of inter- 
est to the student body. 

My Life With George by I. A. R. 
Wylie. 

The Background Of The Revolt, 
tion In Maryland by Charles A. Bar 
ker. 

Point Counter Point by Aldou: 



Souder Presides 
At Debate Club 

The first meeting of the Paul E. 
Titsworth Debate Club was held last 
Monday night. President Souder 
opened the meeting by welcoming 
both Freshmen and old members. 

It was announced that sometime 
after the Christmas holiday an inter- 
collegiate debate would be held in 
assembly. After this and all other 
debates, the students who participat- 
ed will report to the club the argu- 
ments used by their opponents. In 
this manner those engaged in future 
debates will be better prepared to re- 
fute the arguments of the opposition. 

A Freshman practice debate will be 
held in the regular meeting this Mon- 
day. Anne Boiling and Frances 
Goodwin will oppose Warren Hodges 
and Jack Horner. 



Huxley. 

Raleigh And His World by Irvin 
Anthony. 

The Chemist At Work by Roy I. 
Grady and John W. Chittum. 

Where Evolution And Religion 
Meet by John M. and Merle C. Coul- 
ter. 



KENT COUNTY 
FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Phone 173 



varnishing and in general endeavor 
ing to improve Theta Chi. 



Lambda Chi Alpha 

On Monday evening Epsilon Theta 
Chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha enter- 
tained the male faculty members at a 
smoker. Fifteen members of the 
faculty were present. Dr. Mead gave 
a short talk explaining cooperation 
between administration, faculty, and 
fraternities on this campus. A fea- 
ture of the evening was a quiz be- 
tween two teams, one composed of 
faculty members and the other chos- 
en from the fraternity members. The 
faculty team was victorious in this 
battle of wits. The rest of the even- 
ing was spent in card playing. 

Epsilon Theta pledged Atlee C. 
Kepler, a member of the senior class, 
last week. 



Theta Chi 
A joint meeting of active members, 
pledges and affiliates resulted in a 
drive for new spirit- within the fra- 
ternity. All members are fixing up 
the house, painting, wall-papering, 



Alpha Chi Omega 

The members of Alpha Chi Omeg. 
sorority who are going to the Ursinu: 
game will be entertained at a buffet 
supper at the home of Sara and Mol- 
ly Blackwood. The Blackwood home 
is in Drexel Hill. 

The Alpha Chi pledges entertain- 
ed the pledges of the other two soror- 
ities at a Hallowe'en party Thursday, 
October 30, in Reid Hall drawing 
room. 



Zeta Tau Alpha 

The 2. T. A.'s are giving a tea for 
their patronesses Wednesday after- 
noon in Reid Hall Library. Monday 
night they had a joint meeting with 
their pledges. 

The Z. T. A. pledges had a bedtime 
party Thursday night for the pledges 
of the other two sororities. A bed- 
time snack was served and games 
were played. 



Alpha Omicron Pi 

The pledges of Alpha Omicron Pi 
held a "Caught In The Draft" party 
for the pledges and pledge captains 
of the other sororities. The party 
carried out the theme army life, even 
to the bean dinner. 



CUMBERLAND COAL 
COMPANY 

Producers Wholesalers 

Retailers 

"Stokol" Stokers 

217 E. Redwood St. 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

Service 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 



▼ 

Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

A 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
— For— 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



Churchill 

"The Home Of Hiti" 
CHURCH HILL - PHONE 2391 
Parking Room Galore 



Sat., Mon., Tues., Wed., 
NOVEMBER 8-10-11-12 
The most amazing love 

story that's the most talked- 

about him in years! 



Not one line cut! Not one 
scene shorter! Exactly as the 
thousands who paid $2.20 
saw it! 




Here's The Girl Who Walk- 
ed Out On $60,000,000! 
Was She A Fool? 

ORSON 
WELLES 

— in — 

"CITIZEN 
KANE" 



THE MERCURY 
ACTORS 

Joseph Cotten 
Everett Sloane 
George Coulouris 
Paul Stewart 
Erskine Sanford 
Dorothy Comingore 
Ray Collins 
Agnes Moorehead 
Ruth Warrick 
William Alland 




See It At Our 
REGULAR PRICES 



Don't Miss That Sensational 
Beginning! 

— See It From The Start- 



THUR. - FRI., NOV. 13 - 14 

A More Amazing Gloria 
Than You've Ever Known 

— returns to the screen in a 
smartly-dressed, sparkling 
comedy of modern marriage. 



ADOLPHE MENJOU 
GLORIA SWANSON 



— with — 

John Howard 

Desi Arnaz 

Helen Broderick 

Florence Rice 



PACE FOWR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, jl 



Maroons To Shift Backs Against Bears; 

Messick Will Add Weight To Backfield \ 



Ekaitis Works On Pass Defense SHoiTXGri LjOS6 
And May Use Heavier Backs 
Against Ursinus Bears 



by John Kordash 

Tomorrow, the Sho'men journey to 
Colkgeville, Pennsylvania, to encoun 
ter the Ursinus Bears in an endeavoi 
to seek their third victory. With ; 
record of two wins and two losses, £ 
.500 per centage, the ,EI;aitismen are 
drilling on their pass defense, a weak 
cog in its Rridiron machine, to defeat 
the Grizzlies. 

The Bears under Pete P. Steven: 
are well known for their hard charg- 
ing lines. Their record is not very 
impressive as they have yet to chalk 
up n win. In five games, they have 
suffered defeats to Dickinson 19-0, 
Delaware 20-0, Lehigh 0-0, a tie 
panic, Drexel 14-7, and last week on 
a muddy field to Muhlenberg by a 
26-6 score. 

The Bears starting lineup tomor- 
row is Biscotte and Worthing at the 
flanks, Coth and Morrow at tackles, 
Coulter and Binder at guards, and 
Selfridge, occupying the center spot, 
Talarico is at left half with 
small and fast, in the right half posi- 
tion. Ort is quarterback and Stew- 
ard, 194 pounds, plays fullback. 

Coach Ekaitis has made several 
changes in the Maroon and Black 
lineup. Jim Juliana, quarterback, is 
playing the number four position. 
Frank Macielag and Jean Messick 
have been converted into "1" backs. 
Lew Yerkes will play safety and re- 
main a "3" back. Coach Ekaitis 
banks on having more weight in the 
backfield for a trial experiment 
against the Grizzlies. With Bill Ben- 
jamin and Bill Loll at the ends, no 
change is necessary. Benjamin and 
Loll deserve merit for their defensive 
work in the P. M. C. game. Sinclair, 
with Steele close on his heels, and 
Riedy are intact at the tackle posi- 
tions. Frank Gibe and Ray Kirby 
remain efficient as ever at the guards. 
Al Duddcrar, sensational center, 
holds down his job in a deluxe fash- 
ion. 

That the Sho'men seem to lack 
spirit definitely was shown in the P. 
M. C. game. The boys don't seem 
to be "pepping it up" and patting 
each other's j:ood work, whether win- 
ning or losing, and especially when 
losing. A pepperpot is just the rem- 
edy to snap a team out of the dol- 
drums. The Maroons have what it 
takes to be a winning club but lack 
a spark to ignite them. 



To PMC 22-6 



Bartolomeo-Glenn Combine Set 
Up Score In Each Period 



An airminded P. M. C. team made 
excellent use of Washington College's 
weak pass defense to sweep to a 22- 
6 victory on a muddy, wind-swept 
field last Saturday. Unable to cope 
with a strong Washington line 
throughout the game they had but 
one alternative, their passing attack, 
which the Shoremen were unable to 
cope with. 

The first score came when Yerkes 
-standing in his end zone, kicked 
Bartoiomeo who dashed in and out 
the Washington tacklcrs to score. 
Benjamin blocked Gekoski's kick fui 
the extra point. 

Early in the second quarter P. M 
C. advanced the ball to Washington's 
30-yard mark with two passes. From 
here Gekoski booted a field goal. 

After an exchange of punts, Harl- 
nett bucked the ball to the Washing- 
ton 12-yard line where a pass from 
TkaczJ Bartoiomeo to Polet was completed 
in the end zone for their second touch 
down. Gerkoski's try for extra point 
was good. 

In the fourth quarter, again P. M. 
C. unleased their passing fury and 
scored on a pass from Gekoski to Mil- 
ler. Benjamin, starring throughout 
the game on defense, again blocked 
Gekoski's place kick. 

Washington's lone tally came late 
in the fourth quarter when they 
drove 48 yards against a larger sec- 
ond P. M. C. line, and Yerkes plung- 
ed 7 yards for the touchdown. Yer- 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors • Builders 

Phone 305 - 2S8 — Campus Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



kes placement for 
went wide. 



the extra point 



STATISTICS 

Washington 
3 First Downs 

1 Fumbles 

8 Passes Attempted 

3 Passes Completed 

2 Passes Intercepted 
30 Punts (average) 



M. C. 

14 



28 

15 

1 

25 



Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

Jlj GQCl S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



N OD OF THE WEEK > 

Ray "AI" Dudderar, gridiron vet- 
eran, now participating in his fourth 
year of competition rates the nod 
this week. Playing at center, Al is 
a genuine football player possessing 
grit, determination arid a great v 
ning spirit. Coach Ekaitis and spec- 
tators alike who see Al in action 
alizc his football talent. Ray lacks 
weight to go up to the professional 
gridiron ladder, but this is the only 
factor which bars him. He ranks 
among the leading All-Maryland cen- 
ters for the past three years. Dud- 
derar is a reliable player who can be 
counted on every second of the gai 



PREDICTIONS 



Navy 10 - Notre Dame 14. 
Hopkins 6 - Blue Ridge 13. 
Maryland - Georgetown 32. 
Western Md. 13 - Dickinson 0. 
Mt. St. Mary's 6 - Upsala 14. 
Washington 6 - Ursinus 13. 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



MON. - TUES. - WED., NOV. 10-11-12 

Prize Surprise Of The Year 
CHARLES BOYER and 

MARGARET SULLAVAN in 

"APPOINTMENT FOR LOVE" 

There's really something funny going on 
here . . . the bride and groom spend their 
honeymoon . . . five floors apart. 
—A BRAND NEW FIRST RUN HIT— 

_JHUR. - FRI. - SAT., NOV. 13 - 14 - IS 
BIG DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 
GENE AUTRY - SMILEY BURNETTE 

"DOWN MEXICO WAY" 

The biggest Autry hit of all time 

—Plus— 

BRENDA MARSHALL - DAVID BRUCE 

"SINGAPORE WOMAN" 



—NEXT WEEK- 
NELSON EDDY in 
"THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER" 




M (chesterfield 

The Milder Better-tasting Cooler-smoking cigarette 



Coprritht 1941, Ltccm 4 Mima Tobacco Co. 



"V" 



The 




JLJilll 



"V" 



Vol. XLI. No. 9. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD., FRIDAY, NOV. 14, 1941 



Price Five Cents 



GRIDDER 



Over 200 Items 
Exhibited In Art 
Collection Here 



Two hundred items, the handicraft 
of nineteen artists, will be exhibited 
by the local Eastern Shore committee 
Tor the National Art Week in the 

mseum room of the George Avery 

tinting Library from November 
16-19. 

Tiiese items will be in the form of 
jvater colors, oil paintings, etchings, 
lithographs, pottery, woven goods ; 

ood carvings, quilts, and jewelry 
Thu purpose of the exhibit is to in- 
erest people in art, particularly lo 
al art. 

The list of exhibitors, many of 
vhom are residents of Kent County, 
ncludes Mr. Vernon Grant, a com- 
ncrcial artist who illustrates for 
COLLIER'S; Mrs. Mabon Kingsley; 
ho late Mrs. Daniel Ingersoll, who 
painted miniatures; Mrs. Thomas W. 
on, Jr.; Mr. J. Kellogg Smith; 
iliss A. V. Shearer; Miss Mary 
itokes ; Mrs. Laurence Ford ; Mr. 
Ammel; Mr. Neat Truslow; Mr. 
tussell Herd; Dr. Esther M. Dole; 
Irs. Gretchen Kratzer Wood, who is 
t present in Puerto Rico directing a 
National Art Week exhibit; Mrs. Jul- 
D. Corrington; Mr. George B. 
[eester; Mrs. Alice Dole Kecster; 
tev. William Wyllie; Mr. Howard 
'.vie; and Miss Bessie Nicholson. 

These artists are graduates of such 
nstitutions as the Chicago Art Insti- 
Qte, Maryland Institute of Art; Art 
itudents' League of New York; Peno 

lvania Academy of Fine Arts; and 

e Philadelphia School of Design. 

One exhibitor was formerly on the I 
oard of directors of the Art Stu- 
ents' League, one held a Carnegie 
Scholarship in art to Harvard; anoth- 

is a former member of a large pot- 
ery company whose wok was exhib- 
ted at the New York World's Fair. 

The exhibit will open with a tea at 

:00 P. M. on^Sunday, November 16, 
n the museum room, to which the 
ublic is invited. Those pouring at 
he tea are Mrs. Gilbert W. Mead, 
lis. Morris Barroll, Miss Amanda T. 

radley, and Mrs. H. A. Kratzer. 

This is the first of a series of ex- 
ibits planned for this year, which 

ill culminate in the historical ex- 
ibit to be held in June and last dur- 
H the Tercentenary celebration. 



An Editorial 



MCA Dancing Classes 

Are Called A Success 



The dancing classes sponsored by 
e Y. M. C. A. are proving to be quite 
success according to Edgar Wood, 
nee committee chairman. Attempts 
6 being made by the dancing com- 
mittee to eliminate experienced dane- 
tr » and to encourage beginners. The 
sses are now being held on Mon- 
>*, Wednesday and Fridays, immed- 
ely following lunch, in Reid Hall 
nder Dean Bradley and Mother Wil- 
s supervision. Wood suggested 
"at there are still some who haven't 
•'ailed themselves of this opportuni- 
' and all who have not are invited to 
o so. 



he 



A situation has arisen on the 
campus which leaves the editor in 
an unhappy, unenviable position. 
He is torn between loyalty to a 
friend and duty to the student 
body — a student body that elected 
him to a position which carries with 
it the sacred obligation of endeav- 
oring to lead and mould student 
opinion along proper channels. 

In this position there are several 
courses available. The incident 
could be skimmed over without edi- 
torial comment, a course that would 
satisfy many but brand the editor, 
in his own mind, at least, as a cow- 
ard. Along another course loyal- 
ty could hold sway, the editor go- 
ing along with his friend, right or 
wrong. Such a course would lead 
only to resignation from the edi- 
torial position for the violation of 
the trust placed in him by the stu- 
dent body. 

Thus, to one whose whole life is 
wrapped up in newspaper work, 
there is but one course to follow. 

The incidents which brought 
about this unhappy situation have 
been told and retold, discussed ov- 
er and over. Their presentation 
here would add nothing of value. 
It is clearly admitted by all that 
the authority of the football coach 
has been questioned. 

The refusal of a player to obey 
orders of a coach is much the same 
as the refusal of a soldier to o"bey 
the command of a higher officer. 
It' comes under the head of insu- 
bordination, to put it mildly. On 
that charge, therefore, the editor 
feels that he must substantiate the 
coach. 

No one, any more than I, would 
believe that the player concerned is 
a saboteur, that he would willing- 
ly or knowingly undermine the 
morale or spirit of the team. His 
position in the student body is too 
high, his loyalty undented. And 
yet, the very act of questioning the 
authority of the coach can have 
naught but' a weakening effect on 
the morale of the squad. If one 
can refuse to obey an order, others 
have the same right and respect for 
authority, which after all is the 
main ingredient of morale, is gone. 
To this editorial mind a happy 
solution presents itself. The foot- 
ball squad should toss aside its pe- 
tition for the reinstatement of its 
co-captain and star and by its ar- 
j guments through action against Mt. 
St. Mary's on the field tomorrow 
present a stronger case. The team, 
by its efforts against the Mounts, 
can restore the coach's faith in 
their morale and spirit. That, af- 
ter all, is the issue involved. 

If their arguments by efforts are 
substantial enough tomorrow the 
squad could present itself, in per- 
son rather than by petition, to the 
coach and have much weight in 
their favor when asking for rein- 
statement. With such an ending 
the incident would no longer be a 
blot, a sore spot in what should be 
a healthy, happy college commun- 
ity. 

J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 




ITION COACH 



Final Plans Are 
Drafted For Elm 
All-College Fete 

Chairmen for the committees in 
charge of All-College which will be 
sponsored by the ELM on November 
29, met for the second time Tuesday 
and final plans were drafted. Cal- 
vert Jones, general chairman, an- 
nounced that a record attendence is 
expected from all previous indica- 
tions". 

Dave Bartolini, in charge of the 
election of Mr. and Miss Washington 
College, announced that nominations 
for the positions would be held on 
Monday, November 17. Ballots are 
printed on page three and will be cast 
in the ELM office on that day. The 
election of the candidates will be held 
in Bill Smith Hall on the Thursday 
before the coronation. 

Extensive decorations are being 
planned by Sara Blackwood and Jean 
Leland. The orchestra stand will be 
at the far end of the gym as usual 
while the throne for the coronation 
will be placed at the center of the 
right side. Tables will be placed in 
a semi-circle facing the orchestra and 
throne. Reservations may be made, 
beginning next week, with Jim Stev. 
ens who is in charge of the seating. 

Frances Mead, who is in charge of 
the orchestra and the floor show, has 
not made any definite announce 
ments but he promises a full half 
hour of solid entertainment. The 
dance will be semi-formal. 



Squad Denies Charges On Ray Kirby Of Insubordination And 

Cause Of Dissension On Team Made By Coach 

Ekaitis To Press Wednesday 



The entire football squad stood behind Ray Kirby today, 
when they presented to Coach George Ekaitis, at noon today, a 
petition stating that his reasons, as printed in the Enterprise 
Wednesday, for dropping Kirby from the squad were unjust. 
Ekaitis stated in the Enterprise that he had dropped the popu- 
lar young gridder from the squad for "insubordination" and be- 
cause he has been the cause of "dissatisfaction and dissension" 
among the players. He claimed that he was making the move 
for the "best interest of the squad." 

The statement from Ekaitis brought spontaneous protest 
from the squad and each member signed the petition of his own 
volition. The petition stated: "As a member of the Washing- 
ton College football squad, it is my opinion that Ray Kirby ha? 
in no way caused any dissention and dissatisfaction on the squad 
and his attitude has not had a bad effect on the morale and 
spirit of the team." Beneath the typed words were scrawled 
thirty-five signatures. 

Kirby Denies He Was Dropped 



Radio Donates 
Air To Debaters 



Maj. Lamborn Is 
Slated For Next 
Assembly Period 

Major Louis E. Lamborn, Head- 
master of McDonogh School, for boys, 
will be the assembly speaker on No- 
vember 27, according to Mr. Good- 
win. 

Major Lamborn was born in Kent 
county, but moved to Baltimore at an 
early age. He graduated from Dick- 
inson College at the head of his class. 
Since then, Major Lamborn has man- 
aged a coal mine and a ranch, been 
active in the commission business, 
was a teacher and physical director, 
enlisted in the air service in the last 
war and has been an organizer. 

McDonogh School has progressed 
greatly since Major Lamborn became 
headmaster of the school in 1925. At 
that time the total enrollment of the 
school was less than 125 boys, but 
now has reached a total of 600. A 
day school was begun in 1927, and 
has progressed so that there are now 
12 busses going to all parts of Balti- 
more and many sections of the coun- 
ty to carry the 300 day students to 
and from the school. 



Thanksgiving Recess 

The Thanksgiving holidays will be- 
gin officially with the close of classes 
on Wednesday, November 19, and will 
continue through Sunday, November 
23, according to announcement from 
the President's office. 



James M. Aycock and Donald Mc 
Clellan will participate in a radio de- 
bate over Station WILM in Wilming- 
ton, Delaware, on Saturday, Novem- 
ber 29, 1941, Manager Nelson Kay- 
lor announced at the regular meeting 
of the Debate Club. 

A practice debate was held at the 
meeting between two teams compos- 
ed of freshmen members of the club. 
The girls' team, composed of Ann 
Boiling and Frances Goodwin upheld 
the affirmative of the subject; Re- 
solved, That a general course of 
study should be pursued while in col 
lege, while Warren Hodges and Jack 
Horner defended the opposition. 

Robert Holdt and James Aycock 
coached the affirmative team; Jame: 
Diacumakos and Jack Smith assisted 
the opposition. Robert Holdt acted 
as chairman of the debate and each 
speaker was allotted five minutes. By 
a club vote the boys' team won the 
debate. 



Seven Students Sign 

For Aptitude Tests 



Seven students; — the largest group 
ever — have signed up with Dr. Liv- 
ingood to take the medical aptitudt 
test to be given here December 15. 

These tests were first given at the 
College in 1931; they have been giv- 
en every year since. Usually, only 
three or four students took the test. 
Dr. Livingood said. It is a two-hour 
test, covering pre-medical knowledge 
specifically, although occasionally it 
also includes general information. 

The tests are given by Dr. Livin- 
good, after which he sends them to 
George Moss, psychologist at 
George Washington University, who 
makes up the tests, as well as direct- 
ing the work. Dr. Moss and his staff 
do the actual checking; the results 
then submitted to all the mem- 
bers of the American Association of 
Medical Schools. The direct results 
are not given to the students them- 
selves. 



In the Enterprise, Kirby denied he 
was dropped from the squad but left 
on his own volition. "I was a little 

late for practice on Monday," he 
claimed, "and George gave me five 
penalty laps around the field. As I 
jogged around, he ordered me to run 
faster and 1 failed to comply. He 
then told me in no uncertain terms 
if I didn't want to run faster to leave 
the field and stay off. 1 did." 

The dropping of Kirby from the 
squad cuts the second of the team's 
stars from the starting lineup tomor- 
row for Lew Yerkes, stellar triple- 
threat back, will be out of action this 
week, probably for the season, with 
a chipped bone in his left ankle. 

Dudderar Expresses Opinion 
"In my opinion," said CO-COptain 
Al Dudderar, "it's a matter that can 
be overlooked. Kirby should be re- 
instated by all means to raise the 
morale of the team. He has in no 
way caused dissension and dissatis- 
faction on the team." 

Various other members of the 
squad voiced similar opinions but 
Ekaitis remained firm in his decision. 
Coach Ekaitis claimed that he had 
made the decision and he was forced 
to abide by it. 

KJrby Gives Statement To ELM 
"I want to express my sincere 
gratitude to the thirty-five members 
of the squad who, on their own voli- 
tion, drew up and signed a statement 
that directly refutes the accusation 
made against me by Coach Ekaitis. 
My own conscience is perfectly clear 
and I know that I am not guilty of 
hat I am accused and it is nice to 
know that others incur in this belief. 
I can honestly say that 1 have done 
all in my power to make the football 
team a success. The Coach has ad- 
itted this on numerous occasions. 
You can imagine my surprise when 
such an accusation appeared in the 
press. It is unfortunate that such a 
tatement was given for publication 
for it reflects unfavorably on both 
the college and myself. I certainly 
feel that I am justified in resenting 
this, and in view of the overwhelm- 
ng amount of evidence, the Coach 
oust realize that he is mistaken. I 
hope that he will retract the accusa- 

Here's hoping the team beats Mt. 
St. Mary's tomorrow." 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, NOV. 14, 194, 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 
OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 
Established 1782 
Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous Contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 



Letters to the 



Member 

Pusocided ODlle6iate Press 

Distributor of 

Golle6iate Di6est 



National Advertising Service, be 

(/.'■.. PltbliihtTi RtpreienUttPt 
420 Madison Ave. New York. n. Y 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor -■ ■ Frances K " e «", 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor 

Business Staff 



John Kardash 



Business Manager 



Rufus C. Johnson 



Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1941 



DOVWS FIRST CAPITC1 HAS 
MOUSED OFFICES AND CLASS- 
ROOMS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 
IOW SINCE ITS FOUNDING. 
THE BUILDING. VACATED WHEN 
THE CAPITAL WAS AWED TO 
KS MOINES, IS NOW ICO YEARS 
... OLD ■ • • 




Desk Editor M - Blackwood 

Assistants **<»><*• P - Peters 



Coats For Stockings — Fair Exchange 

The Student Council resolution that male students should 
wear coats and ties to the evening meal is becoming neglected 
more and more. When the plan was first adopted there were 
words of approval and praise from the Reid Hall girls and there 
was general cooperation among the men. The Women s Coun- 
cil joined in the plan and required the girls to wear silk stock- 
ings to dinner. 

However, a visit to Hodson Hall during the evening meal 
will reveal that the regulation is not in effect. Men may be 
seen in anything from shirt sleeves to jackets. This rough ap- 
pearance tends to influence the general conduct in the dining 
hall by giving it a less impressive atmosphere. 

Athletes, coming direct from practice, seem to be the chief 
violators, but if some of them are able to wear coats, why can't 
the others? It may be a little inconvenient but it is by no means 
impossible for them to comply with this regulation. 



6eorge sauer is head foot- 
ball COACH AND PAUL SWEET 
CROSS-COUNTRY MENTOR. AT 
THE UNIV. OF NEW HAMPSHIRE / 



NEWS ITEM.: 

«SBDND ANNUAL INTER03LLE6IAIE 
TURTLE TRUDGE WILL BE HELD 
AT DETROIT UNN.THIS MONTH / 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



night. Thanksgiving dinners being 
what they are at Washington College 
they're worth dressing for . . . Thi< 
week's home game, even without e 
dance, promises to be a great con 
trast with last week-end when foui 
people in one place was a crowd. The 
33-0 trouncing the high school took 
the hands of Port Deposit was the < 

On borrowed time we sit down to W highlight of the entire week-end 

OU1" type-writer to ponder Over the ■ • • Congratulations to Lambda Ch 
news of the week. We slipped into "nd editor Johnny Smith on their nev 
basketball practice over at the gym newspaper, the Chigest ... By th« 
last Tuesday. Nobody Would evcrl wav > we «»PP°«e everybody has heard 
believe that those boys had only been I about Pickles. Personally, w 



NORTHEAST 
=CORNER 



out for a couple of weeks. Coach j ll 5 p' en ty 



ckles. Pen 
all right. 



think 



Think It Over Girls! 

As you probably noticed, Miss Doris' gym offices were clos- 
ed at the last dance. This wasn't too great an inconvenience to 
the girls; the wraps could be carried upstairs rather easily. But 
when the first formal dance comes along in several weeks, and 
the offices are still closed, there will be considerable commo- 
tion. 

Miss Doris gave me several plausible reasons for closing 
the offices until further notice. One basis for her action was 
the fact that organizations giving the dances constantly borrow- 
ed furniture and accessories but failed to have them returned.! 
Every Monday morning after a dance, there was a constant hunt 
to find the equipment, since it was needed. 

Before the athletic offices could be opened for a dance, all 
the girls' athletic equipment had, to be packed away. Finally, 
the increased carelessness of the girls themselves necessitated 
some action on her part. Every Monday morning lipstick; 
smears were found all over the walls and equipment, and, 
cigarette butts and paper towels strewn over the floor. This| 
meant a general clean-up before classes. In view of the fact 
that the offices were just freshly painted this year, cooperation 
of the girls must be obtained to keep the offices attractive. 

Miss Doris stressed the fact that the closure of her offices is 
temporary only if the various organizations sponsoring the, 
dances cooperate with her in working out a plan that will be 
satisfactory. Her intentions in closing the offices were to im- 
press upon the girls' minds the conveniences they offered and 
to make them realize the importance of keeping them as they 
are. 



Dumschott has more than two com- 
plete teams of what appear to be sea- 
soned veterans although half of them 
are Freshmen. Among the Fresh- 
men who compose a team of their own 
are Jerry Voith, Val Lentz, "Chuck" 
Klein, Turner Hastings, and Jim Gar 



The exhibits for National Art 
Week moved into the library museum 
Wednesday afternoon and they're well 
worth seeing. The exhibition will 
open with a tea Sunday afternoon 
. . . This column gives the Nod Of The 
Week to Norm Sharrer this week, 



A half dozen more cagers will who, incidentally, is our room-mate, 



"Mind Your Manners" 

While we're on the subject of the Dining Hall, we may as 
well gripe about the manners. If we're going to dress for din- 
ner, we may as well act like ladies and gentlemen. At home 
none of us throws the food he doesn't want on the table, but to 
look at the tables after a meal in Hodson Hall one wouldn't 
think that any of us had had training at home. If you don't 
mind being classed with the swine, you might at least take pity 
on the girl who collects the butter and wipes the tables; it is a 
tedious enough job without having to face everyone's discarded 
dinner. All in all the manners have improved since we first came 
to college, — boys help the girls into their chairs, and people are 
considerate about waiting until grace has been said to serve 
themselves, — but somehow they just can't keep the food on 
their plates. Do you want visitors to think you're a lot of pigs 
in dress shirts? 



appear for practice in the next two 
weeks with the end of football. 

Since there will be no more ELMS 
before Thanksgiving, we have to cov- 
er next week's news and that of the 
first week following the Recess. The 
Monday that we return. Freshmen 
and Sophomores will match their 
brawn in the traditional cane rush 
and tie-up. On the following day 
will come the grudge battle of the 
year on the gridiron. The unsche- 
duled free-for-all will just happen. 
An interesting feature of the grid 
battle is that each team has won four 
times and there have been two ties 
- . . I... and Behold 1 Someone in the 
center house of Fraternity Row leftj 
their porch light on all night. Teh,! 
tch, Mr. Johns ... Dr. Corrington's 
new book, which was released this I 
week, is reviewed in the ELM by Dr.' 
H. O. Mast of Johns Hopkins this 
week. 

Interest in the All-College Night is 
zooming. The committee in charge 
of tables is preparing for a hundred 
and fifty couples. Francis Mead has 
already lined up an interesting pro- 
gram for the floor show. Bets are be- 
ing made as to who will win the pop- 
ularity contest. Nominations will be 
made on Monday and announced on 
the bulletin board as soon as the 
votes have been tabulated. Dr. Jul- 
ian Corrington and his wife have the 
honor of being the first to make re- 
servations. With the continued en- 
thusiasm and cooperation from the 
student body and the Administration, 
the All-College Night will be a tre- 
mendous success. 

Mother Lawrence is expressing her 
hopes that the students will dress up 
for the Thanksgiving dinner Tuesday 



Norm spent well over two hours com- 
posing a news story from idle talk 
that turned out to be just a joke — on 
him ... If Lew Yerkes doesn't appear 
in the game Saturday, it will be be- 
cause of a chipped bone in his ankle 
which occurred earlier in the season. 
If Lew has played his last game this 
season, we salute him for his brilliant 
performance . . . We guess nobody's 
using the library anymore. We 
haven't heard a single complaint in 
two weeks. 

With the hopes that you have some- 
thing for which to be thankful on 
Thanksgiving Day, we say — so long 
and thirty. 



Our Ancestors' Studies 
The article last week regarding thi 
schedule and curriculum of Washing. 
ton College in 17S2 was the result «j 
a recent re-reading of the first print. 
ed history of the College, published 
by Dr. William Smith when tlic syi. 
tern he had introduced was but two 
years old. He had established and 
administered the same system at tht 
College of Philadelphia, where he wsj 
Provost for twenty years. 

Well-Read Washingtonian* 

In the "Elm" article, mention 
made of the collateral reading re- 
commended for each year. Since tht 
article has evoked some expressions 
of interest, I venture to complete th( 
story by exhibiting what the well. 
read Washingtonian of a century and 
half ago was supposed to master ii 
addition to his curricular studies, 
give it exactly as it appeared in print. 
Some of the names and titles are at 
breviated, but if you are interested, 
someone in the Faculty, or the Lib- 
rary, can help you. The column ij 
headed "Private Houre — Books Re- 
commended for improving the Youtb 
in the various Branches." Here 

"FIRST YEAR: Spectators, Ramb- 
lers, &, for the Improvement 
Style, and Knowledge of Life. 

Barrow's Lectures. Par-die's Ge- 
ometry. Maclaurin's Algebra. Ward- 
Mathematics. Keil's Trigonometry. 

Watt's Logic and Supplement, 
Locke on Human Understanding. 
Hutcheson's Metaphysics. Varenius'i 
Geography. 

Watt's Ontology and Essays. King 
de Orig. Mali, with Law's Notes, 
Johnson's Elem. Philos. 
, SECOND YEAR: Vossius. Bossu 
Pere Bohours. Dryden's Essays 
Prefaces. Spence on Pope's Odyssej, 
Trapp's Praelect. Poet. Dyonisius 
Halicarn. Demetrius Phalerius. Stn> 
dae Prolusiones. 

Patoun's Navigation. Gregory's 
Geometry — on Fortifications. Simon's 
Conic Sections. Maclaurin's and Em- 
erson's Fluxions. Palladio by Ware. 

Helsham's Lectures. Gravesat 

Cote's Hydrostatics. Desagulierl 

Muchenbroek. Keil's Introduction. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Where 
Were You? 



Odds And Ends Dept. 
"We got it, but you ain't getting 
it!" union has newly arrived on the 
campus — maybe it's a good idea but 
not according to Dale Carnegie. How- 
somever, it justs means that a non- 
lending unit is existent — want to 
join? Some of the boys accuse some 
of the girls of Reid Hall of knowing 
all of the "dirt" before it even hap- 
pens, but from what we can gather, 
its the boys that tell the girls to be- 
gin with — so what does that make 
them? Maybe the air is clearer up 
:n Pennsylvania, but the football 
•\ boys reported that it is the first time 
they have ever heard cheering while 



they were playing, since the seasoi 
opened. And the wind was agin a$ 
too. 

Pickles is very mad — so he snft 
but that certainly was a nice son! 
that the boys sang Wednesday! Ti 
the Gentlemen; hey, maybe you're no 1 
modest but the girls are — so poI 
down the blinds when you sojourn 
Benny and Sally celebrated thej 
"Steady" anniversary Sunday 
at nine o'clock. Calvert and Psi 
and Jim and Laura helped them- 
maybe they will all be celebrating as 
niversaries next year? 

Kiddies Night at Bennett's still b* 
the same old bystanders — still 1 
ing them over— eh, boys? The 
ful" girls of Reid Hall seem to ha' 1 
weathered the storm beautifully, bo 
we still think that she's no angel. Ai 
college night sounds like a lot of fu" 
Francis Mead's orchestra will play l! 
public for the first time, and we kno' 
that he will be good. 

Four girls flew off the couch in tfe 
Alpha Chi room Monday night win 
a mouse crawled along the back' 
they didn't even stop to get th^ 
coats on the way out. It has gotte 
so bad — or should we say good, tM 
the traps no longer need cheese ' 
Reid Hall. The mice just love ft 
sound of the""snap." Norm Shear* 
was buffaloed the other day into wr* 
ing a nice article about the intern 
decorator that was coming to "do & 
er" the K. A. house. Ain't brothel 
cruel 



FRIDAY, NOV. 14, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Dr. Corrington Helps Amateurs 
"Working With The Microscope" 

Dr. S. O. Mast, Johns Hopkins Scientist, Reviews Manual 
Written By Faculty Member 



The author says: "Most books writ- 
ten for the purpose of providing in- 
structions in microtechnique fall into 
one- of two classes. Either they are 
rankly juvenile and unscientific, in- 
voking the sensational in an attempt 
manufacture an interest in the 
subject, or they are highly profes- 
sional and technical, designed for the 
upper collegiate level, and presuppos- 
ing some classroom supervision." This 
book is a "manual aimed at that large 
body of serious workers who fall in 
between these two extremes." 

It contains 418 pages divided into 
17 chapters and 3 appendices with 
the following headings: The micro- 
scope. Temporary mounts for im- 
mediate study. Simple balsam 
mounts. Procedures in microtech- 
nique. Processed balsam mounts. 
Cell mounts. Stained whole mounts. 
Smear preparations. Bacteria. Mi- 
croscopic skeletons. Grinding hard 
objects. Sectioning: manual and 
freezing methods. Sectioning: par- 
affin method. The newer techniques. 
Special preparations. Preparation 
and use of reagents. Sources of sup- 
plies. Literature of microtechnique. 
Reference tables. Index. 

The methods presented in these 
chapters are so simply and clearly de- 
scribed and so well illustrated with 
photographs and drawings that they 
ian be readily followed even by those 
who have had no technical training 
vhatever and they are so well chosen 



that if they are consistently followed 
many most interesting results will be 
obtained. Moreover, even those who 




OFFICIAL BALLOT 



In the blanks below, write the names of the boy and girl you would 
like to nominate as the most popular on the campus. Clip this ballot 
from the ELM and cast it in the ELM office between 9 a. m. and 12 a. 
m. and 1 :15 p. m. and 3:15 p. m. on Monday. 



(Most Popular Boy) 



(Most Popular Girl) 
(PLEASE PRINT) 



The names of the three boys and 
three girls receiving the highest num- 
ber of nominating votes will be plac- 
ed upon a ballot for election. The 
one boy and one girl receiving the 



highest number of votes will be elect- 
ed the most popular on the campus. 
The method of voting will be the 
same as that of general elections and 
will be held in the ELM office on 
Thursday, November 27. 



Dr. Julian D. Corrington 



have had considerable technical train- 
ing will find many novel and valuable 
suggestions in them. The book will 
therefore be practically indispensable 
for all except those who have had ex- 
tensive training. 



With The 



Greeks 



Kappa Alpha 

Painters, plumbers and paperhang- 
trs are busily working on" the living 
oom and Chapter room, the down- 
taii's and upstairs halls of the house. 
Die floors of the downstairs rooms 
uid the halls are being varnished and 
lew paper is being hung in the 
ooms. When the work is all finish- 
it!, new curtains and rugs will be 
>urchased. 

Brothers John Selby and Charlie 
'etter, both of the class of '41, were 

sitors over the week-end. Brother 
ijddie Miller, '40, arrived last night 
o spend the week-end. 



Lambda Chi Alpha 
John A. Harris, a member of the 
r Class received a bid from Ep- 
jlon-Theta Chapter of Lambda Chi 

Upha on Monday evening and will be 
ledged tonight. 



Theta Chi 
The downstairs rooms have been 
freshly painted during this past week, 
pd the paperhanger is expected by 
omorrow. 



Northeast Corner , 



(Continued from Page 2) 
Martins's Philosophy. Sir Isaac New- 
ton's Philosophy. Maclaurin's View of 
Ditto. Rohault per Clarke. 

THIRD YEAR: Puffendorf by Bar- 
beyrac. Cumberland de Leg. Sidney. 
Harrington. Seneca. Hutcheson's 
Works. Locke on Government, Hook. 
er's Polity. 

Scaliger de Emendatione Tempor- 
um. Preceptor. LeClerc's Compend 
of History. Gregory's Astronomy. 
Fortescue on Laws. N. Bacon's Dis- 



courses. My Lord Bacon's Works. 
Locke on Coin. Davenant. Gee's Com- 
pend. Ray, Dei-ham. Spectacle de la 
Nature. Religious Philosopher. 

HOLY BIBLE to be read daily from 
the beginning and now to supply the 
Deficiencies of the Whole." 

Book Diet Made Leaders 
Add together these titles and au- 
thors with the ones required for class- 
room reading as described last week, 
and you have the Hundred Books of 
a Washington College student's ex- 
perience at the elose of the Revolu- 
tionary War. They throve on such 
a diet, and made men no less leaders 
in state and church than came out in 
later days under different systems. 
Maybe it's the man and not the sys- 
tem which is most important after all. 
Gilbert W. Mead. 



D O R F ' S 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 

High Street 



Churchill 

"The Home OF Hit." 
CHURCH HILL - PHONE 2391 
Parking Room Galore 



THE FITCH 
DUSTDOWN CO. 

Janitor Supplies 
Baltimore, Maryland 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Tydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



WILLIAM'S 
Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 




Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Phone 132W 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration 
Phone 48 



Alpha Chi Omega 

Mary Louise Truslow has invited 
h<- J sorority to a supper after the 
pine Saturday evening. The girls 
ave been invited to bring their dates. 



Zeta Tau Alpha 
•'■ 'a Ta'u Alpha gave a tea on.Wed- 
pday afternoon at 3:30 in Reid 
tall Library in honor of their pa- 
fonesses. 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 



Alpha Omicron Pi 
Ann Murray Gordon was pledged 
& the sorority on Monday night. Af- 
the ceremony, a joint meeting of j 
pledges and actives was held. 
Marie Thornton was the guest of 
tty Nash after the game at Ursinus 
st week-end. Kirby Chapin, ex-'44 
■sited the campus last week-end. 



Thanksgiving Holidays are 

Here! 

Have fun — and when 

you're in Baltimore, 

remember to shop 

at 

HDTZLER BPQTHERS € 

Howard, Saratoga and Clay St*. 



The First 
National Bank 



PAINT 

for EVERY need 

"Time-Tested Products" 

The Glidden Company 

21 N. Liberty Street 

Baltimore, Maryland. 



▼ 

Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

A 



GARI- SUTTON -DAILEY.Jr. 

Alan Mowbray • Leonard Carey 
Irving Bacon • Joyce Compton 

Lillian Yarbo • A JOIhCenlury-fei Picture 



THURSDAY, NOV. 20 

Continuous 4 to 11 P. M. 

Your 

Thanksgiving 
Treat! 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A complete line supplies plus all text* 
For all classes 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 




ALICE FAYE 
JOHN PAYNE 
CARMEN MIRANDA 
CESAR ROMERO 

la 

Week-End 

In 

Havana 

In 
TECHNICOLOR 




PAGE FOOT 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, NOV. 14, 19 4l 



BARNSTORMING with John Kardash 

Playing their last home game of the current season, the 
Sho'men will be in the role of the underdog to Mt. St. Mary's. 
The Mounts will have too many guns for the Ekaitismen. The 
Maroons will take the field minus two of its star performers, 
Lew Yerkes and Ray Kirby. Lew, who heads the State's scor- 
ers with a total of 26 points, is on the casulty list due to a chip- 
ped ankle bone concurred in the Ursinus game. Ray Kirby 
will be on the sidelines because of a slight misunderstanding. 

Bull Draper, Head Coach of the Mounts, has a strong elev- 
en possessing fine running plays and a good passing attack. To 
date, the Mounts own a .500 record, winning three and losing 
the same number. The Emmittsburg boys defeated Potomac 
State 6-0, LaSalle 7-6, and Upsala 19-0. Its losses were at the 
hands of George Washington by 25-0, Western Maryland 24-21, 
and Delaware 25-0. 

Jim Rogan, sixth leading scorer in the State with 18 points 
to his credit, will be at left end. At the other flank will be 
Skidmore, a very promising Freshman. Foy and O'Connor are 
in the left and right tackles respectively. Lamas is at left 
guard with Coffey, a very good defensive lineman, in the right 
guard position. Clarke occupies the center slot. 

Bob Asip, veteran back and 1939 All-Maryland candidate, 
will head the Mounts' backs. Bob is a fast, hard runner and 
performs in the fullback spot. Danny Hall, another seasoned 
back, will play right half back. Bill Lawless will be at the left 
halfback position with Ellis calling the signals. 

The Sho'men will present a revamped lineup against the 
invaders. Al Nowak will start at the fullback spot and Joe 
McLaughlin, because of his sparkling play against the Ursinus 
Bears, will get the nod at quarterback. Walt Brandt and Frank 
Macielag will remain intact at the halfback positions. Gayle 
Steele will replace Ray Sinclair in the starting lineup at tackle. 
Billy Hoban will probably fill in the guard spot left vacant be- 
cause of Kirby's absence. 

Bill Benjamin and Bill Loll are at right and left ends re- 
spectively. Frank Gibe and Bill Hoban will be at guards. Wil- 
son Reidy and Gayle Steele are the tackles with Ray Dudderar 
at center. 

Four Seniors will play their last collegiate home game to- 
morrow on Kibler Field. Wilson "Abner" Reidy, is strong as 
an Ox and a bulwark on defense, 6'2", 185 pounds in stature, 
Wils has filled in the tackle berth with capable performances 
throughout the season. He is a local product and the home 
town folks admire this big, likeable lad. Another Chestertown 
candidate is Willie Benjamin, 5'8", 203 pounds. Although Bill 
hasn't seen much action he still has the willingness and loyalty 
to stick in there. Jimmy "Dirty" Dougherty, the "mighty 
mite" from Waterbury, 5'5" and weighing 155 pounds, winds 
up the home season also. "Lil" Jimmy supplied much color 
and aggressiveness to the squad and, despite his size, has foot- 
ball ability and smartness. Al Dudderar, 5 ? 11" and 165 
pounds of football blood concludes a sensational four year span 
of competition before the home folks. Al, a native of Balti- 
more, will be sorely missed next year because no other center in 
Washington College history has turned in such consistently 
sterling performances. Ray Kirby, another Chestertown pro- 
duct, is also a senior who rounds out a noteworthy gridiron 
career. 

To these boys go the "best wishes" and pats on the back — 
they deserve it, folks, one and all ! 

Coach Dumschott is starting to put his charges through 
their most intensive period of training. Scrimmages are daily 
occurences now and the squad of 14 is being thoroughly drilled 
in pivoting and lay-up shots charging for the basket. With the 
opening game scheduled approximately a month away, there is 
still more grinding practices ahead. 

Football ends next week and among the gridmen to don 
basketball togs will be Lew Yerkes, Jim Juliana, Stoney Mc- 
Laughlin, Bill Benjamin, Jim Svec, Gil Conant, Frank Gibe, Ray 
Sinclair, Al Mackerell, and Bill Loll. 



N OD OF THE WEEK 



Joe "Stoney" McLaughlin, the 
fighting Irishman from Chester, Pa., 
is the "nod" winner this week. Ston- 
ey, one of the most colorful gridmen 
on the team, sparkled the Sho'men to 
their tie game against Ursinus. A 
fast, clever pivoter and experienced 
ball-toter, "Little Irish" is at his best 
in nip and tuck contests. He runs 
with perception, side stepping, "and 
dodging tactics which strikes specta- 
tors with pleasure. 

Take a bow, Stoney — you've earn- 
ed it I 



PREDICTIONS 

Maryland 7 - V. M. I. 13. 
W. Maryland - Lafayette 33. 
Blue Ridge 6 - Randolph-Macon 30, 
Notre Dame 7 - Northwestern 13. 
Pittsburgh - Nebraska 7. 
Washington - Mt. St. Mary's 32. 



CUMBERLAND COAL 
COMPANY 

Producers Wholesalers 

Retailers 

"Stokol" Stokers 

217 E. Redwood St. 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

Service 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



Frosh Win 1st 
Hockey Clash 

Freshmen 1 - Sophomores O 
The Freshmen are the proud win- 
ners of their first victory this year. 
Although it was extremely cold out 
on the field on Tuesday, the girls got 
out there and really fought to the 
end. As you can easily assume, it 
was a close and exciting game. Laura 
Rainy and Pete Hammond played a 
good game for the Sophomores while 
the Freshmen made their one and on- 
ly winning goal with the able assist- 
ance of Harriet Olson. It was a 
good game and there was plenty of 
action. Good luck freshmen and bet- 
ter luck to the sophomores. 

Thursday there will be the game 
between the Juniors and the Seniors. 
The Seniors have a good team but 
they will be playing the champion 
team of last year. This should be a 
good game and a hard one to win. 



Sho'men Tie 

Ursinus 0-0 



[ The Sho'men were outplayed by 
j Pssinus last Saturday in a vehy drab 
game. Time and again the Bears 
were presented with scoring oppor- 
tunities but lacked the touchsown 
j punch. Poor taekling on the Wash- 
] ington squad was very evident. Ston- 
] ey McLaughlin looked very impres- 
1 sive both on defense as well as of- 
fense. 



Frosh-Soph Date 
Set By Council 



The annual Freshman-Sophomore 
contests will be held on November 24 
and 25, immediately after the Thanks- 
giving holidays, announced Harry E. 
Lore, chairman of the Council's Fresh- 
man Activities Committee. 

The tie-up, used as a contest of j 
brawn between the two classes will, 
be held on Monday afternoon. In the 
tie-up, members of both classes are 
placed in a large circle and given 
short pieies of string. Earh team at- 
tempts to bind the feet of as many 
as possible of the opponents and dragi 
them from the circle. The class hav-i 
ing the greater number of members 
remaining in the circle are the vic-i 
tors. 

The second event will be the tug- 
of-wnr, which is to be held immedi- 
ately after the tie-up. An even num- 
ber of men are picked from each 
class and, after each team takes its 
place, a stream of water from a fire 
hose marks the line over which the 
losers must be pulled. Naturally, 



the losers become drenched in the 
water. 

On Tuesday afternoon, the rival 
class gridders will hold the spotlight 
and determine which class numerals 
will be engraved on the victory tro- 
phy. To date, this event has been 
held ten times, with each class boast- 
ing four victories. Two of the games 
have resulted in 0-0 ties. 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



KENT COUNTY 

FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Phone 173 



For that 

"Esquire look" ... 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

Le&U. S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



MON. - TUES. - WED., NOV. 17 - 18 - 19 
HERE IT IS — THE GREAT HIT 

"THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER" 

— Starring — 

NELSON EDDY - RISE STEVENS 
The screen's gayest musical. Packed 
with laughs, melting melodies and impetu- 
ous love. Joyous is the word for this big 
musical fun show. 

PLAYING HERE DAY AND DATE WITH 
LOEWS CENTURY IN BALTIMORE. 

THUR. - FRI. - SAT., NOV. 20 - 21 - 22 

—BIG DOUBLE FEATURE SHOW — 

ROY ROGERS - GABBY HAYES 

— in — 

"BAD MAN FROM DEADW00D" 

—Plus— 

"SWING IT SOLDIER" 

— with — 
FRANCES LANGFORD - KEN MURRAY 
DON WILSON - BRENDA & COBINA 
Your favorite Radio Revelers in a fine 
new show. 



How to Win Friends 

in one easy lesson 
Treat yourself and others to 
wholesome, delicious Wrigley's 
Spearmint Gum. Swell to chew. 
Helps keep breath sweet, teeth 
bright. The Flavor Lasts^ 




NEWS irv 
BRIEF. . . . 



President Mead In New York 

Dr. Gilbert W. Mead represented 
Washington College at the National 
Jnterfraternity Council Convention in 
New York City this week. He orri 1 
e d in New York Thursday evening 
pnd will return this evening to be 
present for the All-College Night. 




Vol. XLI. No. 10. WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD, FRIDAY, NOV. 28, 1941 Price Five Cents 



Players Get New Sets 

New lighting equipment has been 
obtained and set decorations have 
been made by Ed Palder for the pro 
ilnction of "Smilin' Through" next 
Friday night. Despite trouble in find- 
ing time agreeable to everyone for re- 
arsal, practice is going into its last 
;ek with nearly everyone's know- 
ing his part. 



Faculty At Convention 

Dr. Mead, Dr. Livingood, Dr. 
Howell, and Mr. Goodwin attended 
the fifty-fifth annual convention of 
the Middle States Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools, Friday 
anil Saturday, November 21 and 22, 
in Haddon Hall, Atlantic City, New 
Jersey. 

Dr. Livingood was elected to the 
Executive Committee of the Eastern 
Association of College Deans and Ad- 
visors of Men. Dr. Howell was elect- 
ed vice-president of the Middle 
States Association of Collegiate Reg- 
istrars. 



Debaters To Broadcast 

Warren Hodges was elected As- 
sistant Manager of the Debate Club 
in the regular meeting last Monday 
night. 

Tomorrow afternoon at 2:15, Jim 
Aycock and Don McClellan will en- 
gage a debating team from Swarth- 
niore College over Station WILM, in 
Wilmington. Harry Myer and Har- 
Roe will oppose Warren Hodges 
and Jack Smith in a church debate at 
Galena at 7 o'clock on Sunday, De- 
cember 6. 



SSO Files Scholarships 

Ail scholarships offered to students 
of the College will be filed by a com- 
mittee of SSO members, it was decid- 
ed nt their last meeting. This will 
enable the students to know what 
scholarships are open in the various 
departments. 

The activities of former members 
of SSO will be catalogued in the near 
future, so as to point out their suc- 
cesses after they left college. 



Historians Plan Trip 

The Historical Society will go to 
Annapolis on Sunday, November 30. 
Those wishing to take the trip should 
sign the notice on the bulletin board 
in William Smith Hall. 



Two Members Of A. A. Die 

The Rev. Dr. George C. Graham, 
'97, of Wilmington, and Mark 
Flounders, '98, of Rising Sun, died 
last month. The Rev. Dr. Graham 
had been pastor of Calvary Church, 
Wilmington, for the past 18 years. 
Mr. Flounders had been connected 
with the National Bank of Rising 



Intramurals Begin Monday 

Intia-mural basketball games will 
begin Monday. Rosters of all twelve 
teams in the fraternity, hall and class 
leagues were received by the athletic 
office this week and the full schedule 
will be completed soon. 



Elm Meeting 

An important ELM editorial 
staff meeting will be held Mon- 
day afternoon at four o'clock 
■ n the ELM office. All staff 
i members must attend. 



College Night 
Will Feature 
Cabaret Show 

President Mead To Announce 

Mr. And Miss Washington 

Tomorrow Evening 



The All-College Night committee? 
drafted final plans this week for the 
table dance tomorrow night. These 
plans were shrouded in secrecy. Al- 
though beseiged by many interested 
students, the committeemen managed 
to keep details of the cabaret theme 
from the student body. 

Results of the popularity election 
are known only to Chairman Jones 
and the men nominated — Eartolini, 
Clark and Davis. These four tabu- 
lated the votes Thursday night. 

"We ain't a-talking" was the only 
response that this ELM reporter was 
able to extract from the leaders of 
the All-College Night extravaganza. 
In fact it was like pulling teeth to dis- 
cover that the festivities would be 
held in the Gymnasium and would 
commence at 8 o'clock. 

Coronation Is First 

By eavesdropping and by "greas- 
ing" a few palms, your reporter found 
that the coronation of Mr. and Miss 
Washington is the initial event of an 
exciting evening. Dr. Mead will 
crown the winners of the popularity 
contest and will also address a few 
words to those present at the night 
ub. 

It was discovered from a man who 
knew a man who overheard a conver- 
sation between the. "brain-trusters" 
that Jim Criss will be the Master of 
Ceremonies. He will not only an- 
nounce the various acts of the floor 
show but will also fill in as head 
waiter, bar-tender, comedian and bot- 
tle checker. 

Mead Makes Debut 

Not learning much from Criss, this 
"foot-weary" reporter turned to the 
feminine side to learn a little about 
the music and floorshow. Frank 
Mead and his Orchestra will make 
their formal debut on the campus. 
Bob Hill, a trifle biased by his posi- 
tion as Business Manager of the or- 
chestra, characterizes the group as 
"fifteen pieces of solid rhythm." If 
practice and hard work will help to 
make a band, these boys should be 
'really hot." For about two months 
the orchestra has been practicing, 
working hard to create a band cap- 
able of playing for any dance — here 

wherever else it might make an en- 
gagement. 

Floor Show Will Surprise 

From the few facts uncovered it 
seems as if the floor show will be the 
surprise of the evening. Naturally 
secrecy surrounded this part of the 
program and little was learned. Ac- 
cording to rumors, the "brain-trust- 
ers" have not overlooked the faculty. 
Criss, gloating and rubbing his hands 
together in glee, said only. "Just 
wait. I've been waiting a long time 
to get my hands on . . ." Hearing a 
report that foreign entertainers had 
been secured for the evening, the 
poor reporter gritted his teeth and 
again "hit the trail." The only fact 
uncovered by hours of work was that 
the entertainers were feminine and 
more than a little shapely. For the 
aesthetic patrons of this red hot night 
club, a great composer has been en- 
gaged. (If you don't believe all 
this, come and see for yourself.) 
Nothing could be uncovered about 
{Continued on Page Six) 



Make Your Reservation 

If you have not reserved your 
table for All-College Night, do 
so now. Jim Stevens, who is 



in charge of 


reservations, says 


that there w 


ill be a table for 


everyone. 




Remember 


the Dance and 


Reservation 


costs but 50c per 


couple. It ■ 


semi-formal and 



no corsages are being given. 

The coronation of Mr. and 
Miss Washington will begin 
promptly at 8 o'clock tonight. 
Chairman Jones requests that 
everyone be present before this 
time. 



Washington Tops All 
Colleges In Inter-Frat 

Scholarship Ratings 

Lamborn Speaks 
On College Aims 



Zetas Hold Lead 
In Frat Report 

Fifty Percent Of Student Body 
Reported To Dean 



Zeta Tau Alpha again leads the 
organizations in scholastic standing 
this month with only three girls re- 
ported to the Dean. Theta Chi, 
which was at the top with Zeta, has 
fallen to the bottom of the list. 

Of the three hundred and fifteen 
Students enrolled, one hundred and 
fifty-nine were invited to the Dean's 
monthly tea party. This is fifty and 
four-tenths per cent. The upper- 
classmen may have a choice of see- 
ing the Dean or their departmental 
advisors. 

This month forty-two Freshmen 
were reported, as contrasted to six- 
ty-two last month. Forty-seven 
Sophomores received invitations to 
tea, an increase of fourteen. The 
Junior class, which had twenty-three 
(Continued on Page Six) 



McDonogh Headmaster Urges 
Students To Work 



Major Louis E. Lamborn, Head- 
master of McDonogh School, challeng- 
ed Washington students to consider 
their purpose in coming to college in 
an assembly talk Thursday. 



All-Men's Average Highest 

Of 180 Universities 

And Colleges 



by Dr. Gilbert W. Mead 



for 



Washington College receives 
outstanding national distinction 
the comparative level of scholarship 
of the fraternity men for the year 
1940-41 in the annual report of the 
If you hope to get anything out of] ^■"Jfr Committee of the Na- 
tional Interfraternity Conference 
which has just been issued. 

The report, issued on the eve of the 
annual meeting of the Conference, 
which is being held this Friday and 
Saturday in New York, lists in detail 
the scholarship performance of more 



life, you must learn to work, said 
Major Lamborn, adding, "I question 
very much if any of you are prepar- 
ed to meet anything but success in 
the life to come." "Capacity grows 
through the use of capacity" was one 
of the thoughts left with the audi- 
ence. He said that we learn through 
our successes, not our failures. 

In his concluding remarks the ma- 
jor said, "There's nobdy who can 
keep us from becoming a spark of the 
infinite if we will it. You should 
learn to work to reap the profits of 
life. 

Major Lamborn, a native Kent 
Countian, is a graduate of Dickinson 
College. Since then, he has manag- 
ed a coal mine and a ranch, been act- 
ive in the commission business, was a 
teacher and a physical director, en- 
listed in the air service in the last 
war, has organized several camps, 
and most important of all, has been 
Headmaster of McDonogh School 
since 1925. 



Freshmen Defeat Sophomores 

In Traditional Class Contests 



Hard-Driving Frosh Eleven Scores In Final Quarter To Win 
Annual Football Game 7-6 



A surprisingly good Freshman 
class completely outclassed the Soph- 
omores in all the annual Frosh-Soph 
contests. Noteworthy in this year's 
competition was the enthusiastic at- 
titude of the Freshmen and a failure 
on the part of a few Sophomores to 
participate in the events. 

The free for all was slow in get- 
ting started on Monday but after 
classes were over, the full force of 
each side congregated outside the 
dormitories and things began to hap- 
pen. Water at first was the main 
weapon, later giving way to flying 
fists and feet causing a general rough- 
house with the struggling students 
meeting mother earth time and again. 
As in past years, members of each 
class who did not participate in the 
action were Blitkreiged by class- 



When retied, the Freshmen proceeded 
to show their superiority by pulling 
the Sophomores through the stream of 
water. 

The peak of the inter-class rivalry 
was the traditional football game, 
which was held on Tuesday after- 
noon. There were many attempts to 
kidnap key players of the rival teams 
but all were unsuccessful. 

The Freshman and Sophomore 
teams were ■well coached by Al Dud- 
derar and Dave Bartolini respective- 
ly, who in the short time they had, 
produced two well-groomed teams. In 
the first half Mike Alteri, guard on 
the Sophomore team intercepted an 
enemy pass (much to his surprise) 
and scampered forty yards to score. 
The all important point after touch- 



mates and given a good going over; in I down failed. Coach Dudderar cer- 
tainly must have given his team quite 
a talking to at halftime for his team 
proceeded to run roughshod over the 
Sophomores, twice being held on the 
goal line. Finally Norman Tarr 
snared a pass in the end zone and 
tied up the score. Big Bill Gray 
kicked the extra point which proved 
the margin of victory. Outstanding 
for the Freshmen were Grey, Svec, 
Lentz, Mackrell and Derringer while 



fact, a few lost their pants in the 
deal. The result of this melee was 
quite a few black eyes and bruises 
suffered by both sides. 

At four o'clock the two classes pro- 
ceeded to the Athletic field where the 
tie-up was held. The Sophomores, 
weary from being outnumbered by 
the Freshmen, were easily defeated. 
Immediately after the tie-up the Tug 
of War was held. At the first at- 
tempt the rope snapped causing both 1 Morgan, Freeman, Hoban, and Wil- 
sides to go sprawling to the ground. [ liams starred for the Sophomores. 



Editor's note: Dr. Mead submitted 
this important news story instead of 
his usual "Northeast Corner." The 
ELM is grateful to receive this 
"scoop" and is proud to make him an 
honorary editor of the ELM. 



than 75,000 undergraduate members 
of 2,389 chapters in 180 colleges and 
universities in all parts of the Unit- 
ed States. Following the listings of 
all figures by colleges and by fra- 
ternities, there is one paragraph of 
significant importance, which will be 
read by Deans and Fraternity offi- 
cers all over the country. It de- 
serves being set out in black-faced 
type. It is headed, "Notable Re- 
cords", and reads as follows: 

"The outstanding record of the 
year was made by the fraternities of 
Washington College with a group av- 
erage of 23 per cent better than all 
men, followed closely by Centenary 



(L«.) 

van 

ban 

Mis; 

the 



th 22 per cent. At Transyl- 
(Ky.). MtlUaps (Miss.), Ala- 
Polytechnic, Furman, (S. C), 
ippi State and Mississippi, in 
der named, the fraternities 
were 10 per cent or more above the 
average of all men." 

The basis of comparison devised 
ten years or more ago by the Inter- 
fraternity Conference is that of the 
scholarship average of all men stu- 
dents in all colleges in which member 
chapters are located. 

AH Men's Average Highest 
It is interesting to notice that the 
all-men's average at Washington Col- 
lege is in excess of the average of all 
men, fraternity and non-fraternity in 
the 180 institutions studied. Of the 
37 colleges and universities studied in 
the Middle Atlantic States region, 
there are but twelve in which the 
scholarship of the fraternity men is 
rated above the all-men's average. As 
already noted, Washington College is 
first in this section as also in the en- 
tire nation. Following Washington, 
in the Middle Atlantic region, the 
nearest rival is Dickinson College, 
followed by Washington and Jeffer- 
son. None of the others stand more 
than 5 per cent above the all-men's 
average, and run as low as .067 above 
the line. They are, in order, Sus- 
quehanna, Gettysburg, Syracuse, 
Rensselaer, Rochester, George Wash- 
ington, Franklin and Marshall, West- 
minster, and Colgate. 

(Continued on Page Six) 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, NOV. 28, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 



Member 

Plisoc'rated Collegiate Press 

Distributor of 

Colle6iate Di6est 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College PublisJiers Representative 
AZO Madison Ave. New York. N. Y 

Chicago ■ Boston • Los Annus • S*n Fnnncisco 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1941 




Pan-is 









Oar Social Calendar Grows 

For a long time the students of Washington College have 
asked for something new, something different on their social 
calendar. It is an old complaint on the hill that too many 
week-ends are dull and dreary, and that the good social affairs 
are few and far between. 

Several of our campus leaders have finally produced a uni- 
que and original idea that may take care of this problem in 
part. This idea has developed into the All-College Night to- 
morrow. The All-College Night will feature the cabaret 
theme and includes reserved tables, orchestra, floor show, and 
the coronation of Mr. and Mrs. Washington. The novelty of 
this type of entertainment here has aroused enthusiasm among 
many students and a good turnout is expected. 

Tomorrow night will be an experiment. It is not only new 
for us but new to the administration, which has given its fullest 
cooperation. For the first time permission for a table dance 
and smoking privileges has been granted. The committee in 
charge tomorrow night appreciates this and hopes the student 
body will show its appreciation by maintaining good, social con- 
duct during the evening. 



What Is A "Friendly College"? 

Who said Washington College is the "friendly college"? 
That brings up the question of what does being friendly mean? 
Does it mean an indifferent nod of your head, or do you feel 
you're being friendly by mumbling "Hi" when it strikes your 
fancy ? 

Being friendly means speaking to everyone, not just to 
your acquaintances, for what better way is there to make new 
ones than to speak to someone else? New comers to the cam- 
pus would always be new if we only spoke to our friends — it's 
our tradition to make these people feel at home and vice versa. 
Freshmen are hesitant to speak — especially to upper classmen. 
Could it be because they're afraid they'll be snubbed? Let's 
hope not! When they come here they receive their Freshman 
Handbooks which suggest that they "speak to everybody" — 
they come here with that intention and we're here to help them 
carry it out — not just during Freshman Week, but throughout 
the year. 

Let's speak to everybody and say more than a "hi" that 
sounds like it's an ordeal! Let's really speak and make this a 
really friendly college ! 



Anti-Strike Legislation Needed 

After the sixth appeal by President Roosevelt, John L. 
Lewis called off the strike of the coal-miners. The leader of 
the C. I. O., their guiding influence and representative of their 
thoughts, finally yielded to the 70 per cent of the American 
public against the coal-miner strike. We cannot but think that 
the majority of miners didn't want to strike, but were under the 
hand of Lewis, who is looking more for personal gain than that 
of labor movement. 

If, at this time, miners and any other laborers in this coun- 
try strike for their desires and wants can they be thinking of 
the national emergency? We cannot see why labor has any more 
reason to strike than the military service men to mutiny. We 
agree, that labor should have collective bargaining power, but 
there is a time at hand when personal gain must be cast aside 
for national gain. The service man is doing as much if not 
more for national defense then is labor and yet he receives 
thirty, forty, or fifty dollars a month, whereas labor makes at 
least this much in one week, without all the discipline, guard 
duty, etc., that go to make up military life. 

Therefore, labor needs discipline to keep preparing for na- 
tional defense. Legislation that outlaws strike is the answer. 
During two years of national preparedness, time and time again, 
production has been held up by strikes and those who do strike 
and won't work should be given military training. 

Keep working or start marching! 




Jhe UNWERsrry of buffalo 

ONCE RAISED AN ENDOWMENT 
FUND OF FIVE MILLION: DOLLARS 
IN JUST TEN DAYS/ 



Coac 

STEWART A. FERGUSON! 

OF ARKANSAS A.&M. HAS A STIP- 
ULATION IN HIS AGREEMENT 
THAT STATES HE DOESNTHAVE 
TO WIN A SINGLE GAME IN THREE 
YEARS/ 



T>own/?eat 



by Marty Warther 



The past summer a major tragedy 
struck the Charley Barnet Band. 
Anthony "Bus" Etri, famed guitarist, 
was killed instantly in an automobile 
collision. The machine was driven 
by Lloyd- Hundling of the Quintories. 
Hundling died of internal injuries a 
couple of days later. "Bus" Etri, 
formerly with the great Hudson-De- 
Lange Organization, was well known 
for his imaginative solo work. Bar- 
net, stunned by the accident, express- 
ed his feelings in these words: "No 
one could replace "Bus" Etri in our 
band and no one will." And no one 
has. The Barnet Band will record a 
number soon in memory of Anthony 
Bus" Etri. 

Last month another automobile ac- 
cident ended the life of a great musi- 
cian. Leon Berry, known to all mu- 
sicians as "Chu," finished a decade 
of swing history written with his 
golden tenor sax. Leaving the old 
Sunset Royals, Chu joined Fletcher 
Henderson in the early '30's along 
ith John Kirby, "Scoops" Carey, and 
Roy Eldridge. Such "immortals" as 
"Body and Soul," "Stardust," "Sit- 
In," and "46 W. 52" were pre- 
served on the red Commodore Label. 
These records will be available soon 
along with the 12 inch wonder "On 
the Sunny Side of the Street." Chu 
plays practically all of "Sunny Side." 
Chu had been playing with the Cab 
Calloway Band before his death. 

Glenn Miller introduced Babe Rus- 

I into his band at tenor sax, switch- 
ing Tex Beneke to lead alto to take 
care of the vacancy left by Hal Mcln- 
tyre. Mclntyre has organized a fine 
band, now in New England. Russin 

II add a new style to the Miller sax 
section. 

The new trek for popular dance 
nds is the "Hollywood Turnpike." 
Jimmy Dorsey is'ready for another 
picture after the success of the pre- 
views of "The Fleet's In." Brother 
Tommy starts work for Metro in De- 
cember. His "Dance Caravan" was 
ecently released. "Ball of Fire" 
features Gene Krupa, "Fifty Million 
Nickels" — Barnett, "Birth of the 
Blues" — Jack Teagarden, "Blues in 
the Night" — Jimmie Lunceford and 
Will Osborne, "Jump for Joy" — Duke 
Ellington. 



Where 
Were You? 



Thanksgiving is over now and all 
the excitement that was to be is now 
past history. Lots happened here 
and abroad, so we are told. An 
amazing turnabout occurred concern 
ing the dorms., Al, are you going to 
bring them back over Christmas 
won't Phil let you? Frank Goodwin 
walked into Dr. Mead's office the oth- 
er day and stated that "frost was or 
the pumpkins" and Dr. Mead re- 
countered with, "well, put your hat 
on." 

The Dean's list looks to us like a 
carbon copy of previous months, or 
maybe we are all on a plateau of de- 
spond. Last week's Frosh-Soph Vic- 
tory dance sounded like a mourners 
club. There was negligence on some- 
one's part to provide couches for the 
chaperons. We don't imagine that 
they are wild with glee to attend. 
Since everyone else is getting "nods" 
we are going to give one to "Shorty", 
for as Gunga Din, he would be per- 
fect. 

Carl has been having his troubles — 
but Becky seems happy about the 
whole affair! This Saturday night 
has been getting a big build up and 
we think it deserves it. Sounds like 
a lot of fun and its different, too. 
Place your bets on who the king and 
queen will be! 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



FOOTBALL TEAM 
HAIRCUT 
ALL-COLLEGE NIGHT 

Everyone of the some more thi 
6,000 people that witnessed the Wfflj 
ington-Delaware clash during the ho! 
idays will declare that Wnshingh] 
College this year had a team of whS 
it could duly be proud. It waj 
somewhat different team from I lie 
that beat Hopkins by a mere fij 
score, played a seoreless tie with I!,, 
sinus, and was defeated by Raiululpjj 
Macon 14-0. In those games, it xt\ 
eleven men apparently going throuj 
a routine. In the 2-0 defeat of lit 
St. Mary's and 18-6 defeat by D«S 
ware it was a machine playing to 
and it surprised everyone, perhap 
with the exception of the team and lb 
coach. 

There were several interesting 
glances on the Wasliington-Delaw 
game, one of which came in the fori 
of a hair-cut. If, on Saturday night 
you notice a bald-headed snxophonu 
playing with Francis Mead' 
tra, you'll know that it is I 
of Delaware students and not old ag t 
Frosh Ted Hazlitt was taken priii 
er up at Delaware Friday night i 
his abductors planned to have a g< 
laugh at his expense. The story g. 
something like this. Hazlitt \ 
caught up at Delaware Friday ni| 
soaping "Beat Delaware" on au 
mobile windshields. The Dclaw 
ians, for a stunt, cut a "D" right 
the top of his golden locks and pUr. 
ned to parade him about the footb»l 
field between halves on Saturdi 

Sometime early Saturday mo 
Hazlitt escaped from his prison un 
had the rest of his hair cut to ] 
the lowly "D". Well, that' 
story, and we can only guess win 
would have happened had he nut c 
caped. It seems to us that mor 
than a football team would hav 
ceived marks of the game. Anotht 
little incident was the piece of 
scene literature in the form of a blu 
circular which was passed out to thl 
spectators at the game. We c-intio 
understand how people who ca 
themselves college students coiil 
lower themselves to such a level. A 
though the name of Washington Co 
lege was mentioned, it was no pal] 
cular reflection on the College, 
was just the idea that such literal 
should be passed out to the parent 
college students, prospective parent 
of college students, and pati 
the colleges. 

To go from the past to the futuri 
we see that All-College Night loon 
before us. Tomorrow night 



■ 



ll' 



(Continued on Page 6) 



Bridgetender Bill 
Traffic Slow 

by Pat Frary 

Bill McGinnis does not like the wat- 
er. This is an unfortunate thing for 
a man whose job is a bridge keeper 
and has been for years. 

Bill, and this is what he likes to be 
called by everyone, lives in that lit- 
tle one room building in the middle 
of the bridge. It's a rather dismal 
place to spend evening after evening, 
seven days a week. In the midst of 
an inumerable tangle of switches and 
gadgets for raising and lowering the 
bridge, rests the one steamer chair 
that comprises the entire suite of 
furniture. 

Bill is stout, slightly gray-haired, 
and he always has a little twinkle in 
his blue eyes. He's about 5'9", and 
the night we interviewed him, he was 



Finds Boat 

On Chester Rivet 



■■■I 



dressed in tan trousers and a whit 
shirt with a gray coat. He smoked 
black stub of a cigar continUi 
and often interrupted our convers* 
tion to swap flies. 

He leaned back in his chair 
blew out a big cloud of bluish stj 
(I stood since there was no other fm 
niture in the room), "Not many 
pass by — maybe two a month. Sa" 
boats, mut mostly work boats. The] 
go up as far as Crumpton. I - 
their lights and then wait for them 
blow a whistle. Then I begin to o? 
en the draw, very completely but s- 
most straight up 'n down." 

Bill works in a gas station durifl 
the day and, according to him, 
knows several of the professors. B 
(Continued on Page 6) 






FRIDAY, NOV. 28, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Room Check-Up iMead, Jones At 
Plans Are Made! Alumni Dinner 



Business Office Will Offer 
Prizes To Winners 



The Business Office, with the C(v 
operation of the Student Council, an- 
nounces the installation of a new 
dormitory inspection plan. The or- 
der of room drawings for next year 
will be based entirely on the scores 
made by the occupants of the various 
rooms this year. Seniority will have 
no effect except in cases where in- 
spection scores are tied. 

There will be two types of room in- 
spection and scoring. The first type 
is under the jurisdiction of the head 
of dormitories and the Student Coun- 
cil President. Points cannot be 
scored if there is any unreported 
d;iniagc to the room or to furniture; 
or, if there is any unapproved wiring 
or extension cords. The first of these 
inspections will not be made until 
after December 5. Before that date 
students should report damage to Mr. 
Brown. Chief Newton will inspect 
nil wiring and will take out all dan- 
gerous extensions. A perfect room 
will receive ten points. 

Another type of inspection will be 
made less frequently. These will be 
made to determine if the dormitory 
rules are being inspected. For each 
infraction five points will be deduct- 
ed from the accumulated score of the 
room. 



German Classes 
Benefit By Fund 



Mrs. Lawrence 
Prepares Feast 



New York Chapter Holds 5th Professor Candler Lazenby 
Annual Dinner Secures $200 Grant 




The New York City Chapter of 
Washington College Alumni celebrat- 
ed its fifth annual dinner on Novem- 
ber 8 at the Gramecy Pork Hotel 
Lexington Avenue, and 21st Street. 

The officers in charge of the dinnei 
were: Albert H. Porter, President: 
B. Lyle Appleford, Vice-President ; 
Dr. Mary C. Cain, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

President Porter concluded his 
felicitations and appropriate remarks 
by introducing Dr. Mary C. Cain as 
toastmaster. Dr. Cain, in her most 
happy manner, introduced the speak- 
ers: Dr. Gilbert W. Mead, Dr. J. S. 
William Jones and Robert L. Swain. 

Officers for the current year were 
elected as follows: B. Lyle Apple- 
ford, President; Dr. Mary C. Cain, 
Vice-President; Lawrence G. Holland, 
Treasurer; Mrs. Edna D. Bennett, 
Secretary. Albert H. Porter, the re- 
tiring president was. elected Honorary 
Chairman. The personnel of the 
Executive Committee is as follows: 
Col. H. S. Brown, James L. Madden, 
Eric H. Wood, Dr. Leroy S. Heck, 
Dr. William O. Baker, Miss Jane D. 
Bowers, J. Scott McKenney, Miss 
Marjorie Smith, J. Stanley Long, 
Miss Eleanor Titsworth and Mrs. 
Beulah L. Greisman. 



Among Alumni 

Marvin H. Smith, '37, was admit 
ted to the Caroline County Bar re 
cently. Following his graduation 
from Washington College he spent 
three years at the University of 
Maryland where he received his de- 
gree. Smith is a member of Theta 
Chi Fraternity and also Omicron Del 
ta Kappa Honorary Fraternity. 



John Addis Copple, '40, has been 
called into the service of the U. S. 
Army William Benswanger, President 
of the Pittsburg Pirates Baseball 
Club, recently announced. For the 
past season Copple played for Lan- 
caster, a farm club of the Pirates. 



Read the ELM 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 

(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 

— For — 

Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



FOR THE <B es f IN 

Laundry Cleaning 

Pressing 

see 

JIM JULIANA 

Representing 

Park Cleaners 



A $200 grant to the German D 
partment has been made by the Hen- 
ry Janssen Foundation, through the 
recommendation of Professor Cand- 
ler Lazenby, a personal friend of D 
Mead's and chairman of the Advisory 
Committee of the Foundation. 

The purpose of the Foundation in 
making donations is "to support Ger- 
man departments in small American 
colleges which are under capable 
leadership but hampered by lack of 
funds," according to Dr. Davis. 

The Henry Jansen Foundation, lo- 
cated at Reading, Pennsylvania, is an 
organization of Germans interested 
in spreading the culture of Germany, 
and is a branch of the Carl Schurz 
Memorial Foundation. The latter or- 
ganization previously made a grant to 
the German Department in 1937. 

The money ia to be used for the 
purchase of books, maps, pictures, 
and phonograph records, Dr. Davis 
tated. "Very often I have wanted 
to buy rather expensive sets of liter- 

y collections which appear on the 
market but the purchase of other 
more necessary books constantly ex- 
hausts my regular appropriation. Now 
I shall be able to buy not only several 
sets of literary collections, but also 
additional texts, maps, and music. We 
are very grateful to be able to pur- 
chase these needed items." 



With The- 



Greeks 



Alpha Chi Omega 

Mary Jane Buckler, '41, and her 
husband visited the campus the week- 
end before Thanksgiving. Since 
graduation she has been acting as 
Dean of Girls at Stonington, Conn. 

Dian Hubbard spent the holiday 
week-end with Mimi Ocker in Balti 
more ; Gretchen Smith and Mary 
Lou Truslow spent Thanksgiving Day 
at Annapolis. 



Zeta Tau Alpha 

Ellen and Phyllis Peters had a mis- 
cellaneous shower for Mildred Brooks 
in Baltimore during the Thanksgiv- 
ing vacation. It was very successful 
and a complete surprise to Mildred. 



Kappa Alpha 
Word was received from Brother 
Spencer Robinson that he is now re- 
cuperating from a knee operation. 
(Continued on Page 5) 

Schedule Of 
Meetings Of Organizations 



MONDAY 

lst-3rd Weeks — Student Gov't. 

6-7:30 P. M 
2nd-4th Weeks— ODK 6-7:30 P. M 
Every Week — Debate Club 

6-7:30 P. M. 
TUESDAY 
Every Week — Fraternities 7 :30 on 
Every Week— Y. M. C. A. 

6.30-8 P. M. 
lst-3rd Weeks — S. S. O. 8-9 P. M. 
2nd Week — Mt. Vernon Literary 

8-9 P. M, 
4th Week — Cercle Francais 8-9 P. M. 

WEDNESDAY 
Every Week — Orchestra 8-9 P. M 
2nd-4th Weeks — Classical Society 

8-9 P. M 
lst-3rd Weeks — Society of Sciences 

8-9 P. M 
lst-3rd Weeks — Historical Society 

8-9 P. M, 
THURSDAY 
Every Week — Glee Clubs 7-9 P. M. 
lst-3rd Weeks — Interfraternity 

Council 6:30-7:30 P. M. 
FRIDAY 
Open 



What It Takes To Feed Many 
Washington Collegians 

by Dot Riedy 

As Mrs. Henrietta Lawrence, school 
dietician, carefully arranged table 
center pieces for the Thanksgiving 
Supper on the Tuesday before the 
holidays, she explained to this ELM 
reporter just how much food was us- 
ed for the dinner. 

Seven gallons of fruit cup alone 
were served for the first course, while 
one hundred and seventy-eight pounds 
of turkey had been bought. The 
vegetables may not have weighed 
that much, but there certainly was a 
large quantity. Seven gallons of 
peas and two bushels of sweet pota- 
toes were served. Of course, the 
sweet potatoes were relished with 
marshmellows in orange rind, and 
were just as delicious as they looked. 

For the lettuce and tomato salad, 
two hundred and fifty-nine tomatoes 
were cut and four bushels of lettuce 
were used. A whole case of homony 
was consumed. 

For the first time in years, Mrs 
Lawrence did not have hot rolls. In- 
stead five hundred biscuits were bak- 
od for the meal. Approximately fif- 
ty pumpkin pies were baked for des- 
sert. 

As is the custom, the light was pro- 
vided by two candles at each table. 
The lighting of them made dinner ten 
minutes late, but the effect with the 
flowers that were on each table com- 
pensated the students for waiting. 



New Books 



Those books being introduced into 
the Library this week with an appeal 
to students as reading matter are as 
follows: 

Not By The Strange Gods by Eliz- 
abeth Madox Roberts. 

Of Men And Women by Pearl S. 
Buck. 

Stanley Baldwin: Man Or Miracle 
by Beechhofer Roberts. 

The Man With A Country by Fred- 
erick Palmer. 

20 Best Short Stories In Ray Long's 
20 Years As An Editor. 

Books that should prove interesting 
to students of psychology are: 

Born That Way by Earl R. Carlson. 

The Recovery Of Myself by Marian 
King. 



A son, Frederic Russell, to Dr. and 
Mrs. Emil J. C. Hildenbrand, of 
Washington, D. C, on October 10 
1941. 



1 


The Psychology Of Adjustment by 
L. F. Shaffer. 




Mental Hygiene In Education by 

W. Tiegs and Barney Katz. 




Juggernanut Over Holland by Eel- 
co Kleffens. 




The Story of Huey P. Long by 
Carleton Beals. 




Frank Knox by Norman Beasley. 




War Messages by Madame Chiang- 
Kai-shek. 




Denmark by Roger Nielsen. 




Letters of Ludwig Tieck by Zeydel, 
Matenko, and Fife. 




Choose 




Hochschild, Kohn & Co. 




for correct 




Campus and College Wear 




Have fun -be friendly 

Treat yourself and 

others to fresh-tasting 

Wrigley's Spearmint Gum 

The Flavor Lasts 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, NOV. 28, 1941 



K 



ARDASH'S 
ORNER 



By 

John 

Kardash 



Winding up the current gridiron season with a sensational 
display of spirit and drive, Coach Ekaitis's eleven shone bril- 
liantly even in defeat at the hands of the Delaware Blue Hens. 
The Sho'men gridderfl exhibited a hard-charging, aggressive 
and impenetrable line which bottled up the clever Delaware 
running attack. Against Mount St. Mary's the Maroon lines- 
men, sustaining eight successive goai thrusts of the Mounts, 
were irremovable and comparable to Fordham's "Seven Blocks 
of Granite." 

Coach Ekaitis realized the potential strength of his charges 
at the beginning of the season and withstanding a few unfor- 
tunate breaks would have had an even more successful season. 
With a .500 record for the '41 season, 3 wins and 3 losses and 
one tie, the Sho'men upset pre-game predictions. In one re- 
spect, however, the Sho'men were unpredictable; that is, when 
picked to win, they lost, and when defeat seemed evident, they 
retaliated with a win. 

Highlights Of The Season 

Highlights of the season were the 26-0 shellacking the Sho'- 
men administered to Juniata ; a thrilling 2-0 upset over a strong- 
ly favorite Mount St. Mary's team, and finally, after outplaying 
a strong Delaware team for three periods, the Sho'men bowed 
to their arch foe by the score of 18-6. 

Individual honors, from this corner, go to Lew Yerkes, for 
his sensational quick-kicking and scoring punch. Lew, with a 
total of 26 points to his credit, should unquestionably gain a 
berth on the 1941 All-Maryland Team. AI Dudderar. because 
of his sterling performances, should likewise merit All-Mary- 
land recognition. Ray Kirby, bone and muscle man of the 
Maroon line, should also earn All-Maryland honors. Frank 
Gibe, watchcharm guard performed constantly well and should 
gain a few votes. Stoney McLaughlin, with his sparkling 
play in the last three games was an important factor in supply- 
ing a winning spirit among his teammates. Bill Loll's fine de- 
fensive work throughout the season should earn Bill honorable 
mention among State players. 

No one player, however, can be pointed out as being the 
most valuable asset to the team. No triple-threat, including 
Tom Harmon can make spectacular runs without the necessary 
blocking. The '41 Washington grid squad had pre-season pos-l 
sibilities of possessing defensive and offensive strength to match 
any eleven on its schedule. If the harmony and spirit which 
the team exhibited in the later contests had prevailed earlier in 
the season, the Sho'men would have suffered but one or two de- 
feats. Nevertheless, in spite of all these facts, it was a suc- 
cessful season for the Maroon and Black. 

We Want Better Seats 

Washington College students who attended the Delaware 
game were entirely justified for their feelings in regard to their 
fruitful efforts to secure seats on the fifty-yard line. It seems 
to me, that students should deserve more consideration than 
the average fan as far as securing mid-field seats. Fortunately, 
however, for the loyal college rooters, all the touchdowns oc- 
curred at their end of the field. In the future, it is hoped that 
the students receive the duly expected consideration. 

The basketeers swing into the final practices with just three 
weeks ahead before the opening jousts in Philadelphia. About 
nine football candidates and a squad of 13 others are intensive- 
ly drilling at the Chestertown Armory. The team's prospects 
for a successful season are considered fairly good at this early 
date. 



Sho'men Lose Freshmen Take 
To Blue Hens Class Game, 7-6 



Big Red Outplays Delaware 
For Three Quarters 



After being outplayed for three 
periods the Delaware Blue Hens came 
roaring back in the final period with 
a three touchdown assault to conquer 
a superior Washington College eleven 
18 to 6 and close their season unde- 
feated and only a tie with West Ches- 
ter State Teachers to blaken their re- 
cord. 

Through most of the first three 
quarters the powerful , Washington 
team kept the Blue Hens in their own 
back yard with the exceptional kick- 
ing of Lou Yerkes and the sterling de- 
fensive work of the "Red" line and 
backfield. Early in the third period 
after driving 43 yards into Delaware 
territory, Lou Yerkes hurled a pass 
over the goal line to Quarterback 
"Stoney" McLaughlin for the score. 

In the early minutes of the fourth 
quarter, Delaware, with the help of 
a 31 yard pass from Hogan to 
Thompson, marched 81 yards for a 
touchdown. Shortly following this 
Sloan intercepted a Washington pass 
and dashed from his own 20 to the 
Washington 20 before he was finally 
stopped. From here the "Blue Hens" 
bucked the ball to the 2 yard line 
where Hogan plunged over for anoth- 
er score. In the closing minutes 
"Buck" Thompson snared another 
Washington pass and raced 40 yards 
for the final score. 
Washington 
W. H. Benjamin LE 
Steele LT 

Kirby LG 

Dudderar C 

Gibe RG 

Reidy RT 

Loll RE 

McLaughlin QB 

Yerkes LH 

Brandt RH 

Macielag* FB 



A fighting Freshmen team eked out 
a thrilling 7-6 victory over a game 
Sophomore eleven before a chilled, 
excited audience of students Tues- 
day. In the second quarter, Mike 
Alteri intercepted a Frosh pass a- 
lound the mid-field stripe and scamp- 
ered for the initial tally of the game. 
The placement kick was missed by 
the Sophs. In the final quarter. Bill 
Gray tossed a 20 yard pass to Nor- 
man Tarr, who stepped over the goal 
for the tying counter. Bill Gray 
promptly booted the all important 
and game winning conversion. It was 
a well-played and hard-fought con- 
test to the end, and the Frosh rose to 
jupreme heights in the final period. 



SIDELINES 

Mike "Hopalong" Alteri's fifty- 
yard dash for a Soph tally in the first 
period was a complete surprise to the 
Freshmen — Mike, you almost were a 
hero ! 

Herb Morgan's terrific tackle cf 
hard-charging Bill Gray was execut- 
ed in pro fashion — Herb knocked 

himself to sleep! 

The Freshmen were "red hot" — 

eh, Sophs! 



NOD OF THE WEEK 

To Coach George Ekaitis and ^ f 
entire Sho'men squad goes the hotio t 
this week- In the most spectaeuU 
tussle of '41 campaign, the fightinJ 
Maroon eleven dropped a thriller t a 
the Blue Hens of Delaware, 18-6, Th* 
Ekaitismcn completely outplayed th« 
Hens for three periods until Del a . 
ware unleased an air attack conibin. 
ed with interceptions of Maroon 
passes to eke out a victory. AgaipJ 
Mount St. Mary's, the Sho'men ( |j,. 
played a world of aggressiveness and 
defensive power to upset a favi 
invader. Coach Ekaitis's fine work 
throughout the season culminated in 
his just reward — a successful season 



Delaware 



Seniors Win 2 
To Lead League 

Juniors Lose One, Tie One; 
Sophs Lose, Frosh Tie 



Seniors 4 - Juniors 
The result of this game certainly 
shows some improvement in the Sen- 
ior team or a slack up in the Junior 
team. However this game was very 
exciting • and was interesting to 
watch. It must be noted that Kitty 
Newton and Lois Stevens play a grand 
game together. 

Juniors - Freshmen O 
The teams certainly do seem to be 
evenly matched this year. This game 
was very fast and the two teams 
seemed to be just about equal in both 
defense and offense. Several times 
both goals were rushed by_ the at- 
tempt failed. 

Seniors 5 - Sophomores 1 
It looks as though the seniors are 
the victors again. This game was 
played on Tuesday and at the end of 
the first half the score was 2-1 fav- 
or the Seniors. However the Sen- 
iors scored three more times on the 
Sophomores to win the game. Laura 
Rainy made the one goal for the 
Sophomores while Virginia Hoopes 
made several of the Senior goals. 



FOR GOOD, 
COAL— 
See— 



CLEAN 



Kibler's 

Coal Co. 



mi 

Distributors Of The 
Famous "Blue Coal" 




Stime's 
Orvis 
Shop 

The Friendly 
Store 



Gill's 

Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

Le&d S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



The Transcript 

Chestertown, Maryland 

Photographic and Engraving Department 



Neat Printing Our Specialty 

Dance Programs, Tickets, Placards, Etc. 



No Job Too Large 
No Job Too Small 



Complete Coverage Of News 



FRIDAY, NOV. 28, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



Z Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 
X Chestertown, Maryland 
Phone 132W 



THE FITCH 

DUSTDOWN CO. 


Janitor 


Supplies 


Baltimore 


Maryland 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber. Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 
Phono 5 



MACK'S 

RADIO 

SHOP 
Kent News Building 



HADAWAY GROCERY 
Meats and Vegetables 

Phone 37 
Cross Street, Chestertown 



Kent County Savings Bank 

Commercial and Savings 

Accounts 

Member Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



Usilton's t 

j Funeral Home, Inc. ' 

/ Phone 72 High St. J 

WONG LEE 

CHINESE 
LAUNDRY 

317 Cannon St. 
Chestertown, Md. 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration" 
Phone 48 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 



Pentagon Will 
Play 20 Games 

Baltimore University Returns 
To Cage Schedule 



A twenty-game basketball schedule 
nine of them on the home court, has 
been announced for the 1941-42 
Washington College cage squad. Th> 
reason will open with a three-game 
trip into Pennsylvania, beginning 
December 1G, and will close with the 
second of two meetings with Loyola, 
the final on the home floor, on Feb- 
ruary 28. 

The three-game jaunt into Penn- 
sylvania will see the Shoremen face 
La Salle, Moravian and Villanova, 
that order, the first and last of the 
trio being among the fastest teams 
in the east. 

Included in the schedule are two 
games with Baltimore University, the 
Bees returning to the Washington 
schedule after an absence of a year. 
There is one tilt with the University 
of Maryland, one with P. M. C, one 
with Towson Teachers and one with 
the Camp Lee, Va., five. The re- 
maining games on the card are home- 
and-home contests with Delaware, 
Johns Hopkins, Loyola, Mt. St. 
Mary's, Western Maryland and Cath- 
olic University, all members of the 
Mason-Dixon Conference. 

The schedule is as follows: Decem- 
ber 16, LaSalle, away; December 17, 
Moravian, away; December 18, Villa- 
nova, away. 

January 9, Baltimore U., home 
January 10, Delaware, away; Janu 
ary 13, Hopkins, away; January 16, 
Maryland, away; January 17, Mt. St. 
Mary's, home; January 21, Baltimore 
U., away; January 24, Western Mary- 
land, home; January 31, Towson Tea 
chcrs, home. 

February 4, Catholic U., away: 
February 7, Loyola, away; February 
10, P. M. C, home; February 13, Mt. 
St. Mary's, away; February 14, Dela- 
ware, home; February 17, Western 
Maryland, away; February 21, Camp 
Lee, home; February 25, Catholic U., 
home; February 28, Loyola, home, 



WASHINGTON - DELAWARE 

STATISTICS 

Wash. T 

First downs 11 

Yards gained rushing ' 147 

Yards lost rushing 35 

Net yards rushing 112 

Forward passes 21 



Passes completed 

Yards gained passes 

Passes intercepted by 

Yards intercepted passes 

runback 

Number of punts 

Average distance of 

punts 

Fumbles 

Own fumbles recovered- 
Number of penalties 



8 

101 

3 

29 
9 

39 
1 
1 
3 



Yards penalized 25 



20 



Delaware scoring: Touehowns: Ho- 
gan, Thompson 2. Washington Col- 
lege scoring: Touchdown: McLaugh- 
lin. 

Replacements: Delaware: Doherty. 
Laurelli, Schmid, Wood, Pitt, Pierson. 
Buchanan, Carullo, Pappy, Sposato, 
Hancock, Coady, Zeitz, Bacr, Thomp- 
son, Marusa, Hogan. 

Washington College: W. H. Ben- 
jamin, Dougherty" Juliana, Grey, 
Jackson, Conant, Mackrell, Messick, 
Nowak, Sinclair, Slade, Svec, Warth- 
er, Hoban. 



Trackmen Run Tomo 



Hazlitt, Katzenberger, Pote and 
Sharrer will represent the College in 
the 3-mile Mason-Dixon Conference 
Cross-Country Meet at American Un- 
iversity tomorrow. 



KENT COUNTY 

FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Phone 173 



Dr. Hildebrand 
Receives Honor 



Was Admitted To The F. 
S. As A Surgeon 



A. C. 



Dr. Emil J. C. Hildebrand, who 
ceived his B. S. from Washington 
College in 1926 and M. D. from the 
University of Maryland in 1930, hai 
just been admitted as a Fellow of the 
American College of Surgeons. The 
degree was conferred November 3 : 
the annual meeting of the American 
College of Sciences. 

In addition to be recommended by 
loc'al surgeons, Dr. Hildebrand sub- 
mitted as his thesis, in book form, 
"Seven Years Experience In Sur- 
gery" in order to be admitted to the 
group. 

Dr. Hildebrand, who is married, 
lives in Washington and practices his 
profession in Garfield Hospital where 
he is a member of the surgical staff. 
He is very active in Washington Col- 
lege alumni affairs, now serving as 
president of the Washington Chapter 
and second vice-president of the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association. 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 

Paints, Hardware and 

Farm Machinery 

Chestertown Phone 51 



WILLIAM'S 
Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



J. 5. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 



Optoir 



■ Lenses duplicated 



Dr. W. H. Moyer 

CHIROPRACTOR 
X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builders 

Phone 305 - 288 Campus Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



A. S. TURNER & SONS 

The Firestone Store 

— SPORTING GOODS — 

Tennis Racquets, Tennis Balls, Footballs, Basketballs, 

Flashlight Batteries, Electric Light Bulbs 

FILL UP WITH GOOD GULF GASOLINE HERE 

High Street 



With The- 



Greeks 



(Continued from Page 3) 
Spence, who hurt his knee playing for 
the College last year, plans to return 
next year. 

Bill Chaires, who transferred to 
the Naval Academy last summer, has 
been elected captain of the plebe soc- 
cer team. Bill was a soccer enthusi- 
ast at the College and tried repeated- 
ly to have it introduced among our 
sports. 

Under the supervision of House 
Manager Bill Paca, the brothers are 
putting the finishing touches on the 
house. The floors of the two down- 
stairs rooms have been sanded, Iac- 
Tuered, and waxed; the steps and hall- 
ways were given a coat of varnish. 
Several new throw rugs have been 
purchased by Paca, and will be used 
in the downstairs rooms. 



Read the ELM 



Y. Officer Hece 



Mrs. Louise Pfeutize, a national of- 
ficer of the Young Women and Men's 
Christian Associations visited the 
campus on Tuesday. She could stay 
only that afternoon and night, but 
while she was here, she managed to 
meet with the cabinet of the VM. 
After attending the YMCA meeting 
Tuesday evening, Mrs. Pfeutize had 
conferences with the advisors. Misa 
Bradley and Dr. Livingood. She al- 
so had conferences with the two pres- 
idents, Phyllis Peters and Bill Nag- 
ler. 



Announcement has been made by 
Mr. and Mrs. Osborne V. Powell, of 
Cedarville, N. J., of the marriage of 
their daughter, Ruth, to E. Arlington 
Sweitzer on Saturday, November 22. 
The young couple will be at home af- 
ter January 1, 1942 at 309 Johnston 
Avenue, Oakland, N. J. Ruth was a 
member of the Class of 1939. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



WHERE TO GO FOR ENTERTAINMENT 
"THE HOUSE OF HITS" 

CHURCHILL 

TWO SHOWS EVERY NIGHT 7 & 9 P. M. MAT. EVERY SAT. 
ALWAYS COMFORTABLE AT THE HOUSE OF HITS 

—FOUR DAYS ONLY— 
SAT.-MON.-TUES.-WED. NOV. 29 - DEC. 1-2-3 




THURSDAY - FRIDAY 

THE FIRST DRAMA OF UNCLE 
SAM'S NEW JUMP-FIGHTERS! 



DECEMBER 4 - 5 



e$>&& ■ 




starring 

Robert PRESTON -Nancy I 
Edrnond O'BRIEN * Harry CARP/ 

vi,h BUDDY EBSEN-PAUl KE11Y- RICHARD CR0MWEU-R0BERT BARRAT 

Produced by HOWARD BENEDICT- Directed by LESLIE GOODWINS 

Oriai"0l Scaon Ploy by Jofin Twill 6 Male? Hu h file, Air C6rp» 
EKO RADIO •" iciui» 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, NOV. 28, 1941 



Editor's Desk . 



(Continued from Page 2) 
time and reservation* arc being map- 
ped up. Reports from the commit- 
tees show that atl la in readiness for 
what really proves to be an experi- 
ment. In order to provide the stu- 
dents with lomething new in enter- 
tainment, this idea has been carried 
through only with the splendid coop- 
eration of the entire Administration 
and leaders of the campus. Through 
their actions and cooperation, the 
student body will be able to voice 
their appreciation for the hard work 
of the committees and their desire 
for another affair such as this. 

For the small price of fifty cents 
(which is designed to merely take 
care of expenses) one will receive a 
full evening of different entertain 
merit. The program will begin 
promptly at eight with the corona' 
tion of Mi', and Miss Washington who 
were elected by the student body ye? 
terday. If one has not previously re- 
served tables, he may do so at the 
door. After the coronation and the 
introduction of the college orchestra, 
dancing will be in order until inter- 
mission at which time there will be a 
half-hour floor show comprised of 
all college talent. For the conveni- 
ence of the patrons, there will be a 
bar serving cokes and sandwiches. 

With the hopes that we will see 
you at All-College Night, we say — so 
long and thirty. 



All College Night . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
the Russian act and the two solos 
which complete this part of the fes- 
tivities. 

The leaders of the gala occasion 
would talk about only two things — 
the- bar and the cigarette girls. Al- 
though limited to soft drinks, the bai- 
ls expected to do a good business. In- 
cidently, this is the first time that 
drinks have been served at a campus 
dance. Cigarette girls add atmos- 
phere and make even more realistic 
the night club background. 



Frats Lead Nation . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Pacific Coast Lowest 
Fraternity scholarship varies by 
geographical regions, as is quite evi- 
dent by the distribution by areas. 
The worst spot is the Pacific Coast, 
where only 20 per cent of the chap- 
ters were above the all-men's aver- 
age. The Western states, the Middle 
Atlantic region, and New England 
follow in order, no more than 35 per 
cent of their chapters achieving the 
average. The average of the coun- 
try as a whole is saved by the North 
Central States group, which attained 
an average of 67 per cent of the chap- 
ters above the line, and the Southern 
States, where 70 per cent made the 
distinction. 

Greeks Lead In Marks 

Fraternity scholarship as a whole 
has been above the all-men's average 
for the country annually since 1929. 
The 1940-41 margin of distinction is 
smaller than in recent years, but is 
still enough to keep the boys on the 
proper side of the dividing line. 

And of them all, Washington Col- 
lege gets the blue ribbon for the 
year. 



Zetas Hold Lead . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
reported last month, dropped tc 
twenty. The Seniors had twenty- 
four reported, adding eleven to their 
list. 

The general average for the fra- 
ternities has fallen, fourteen more 
people having been reported thii 
month than last. Despite the fact 
that they hold the lead, Zeta Tau Al- 
pha had three rather than two girls 
reported. Of the two hundred and 
three hours carried, eight, or more 
than three per cent were reported as 
unsatisfactory. 

Alpha Oniicron Pi, by being con- 
sistent in having two members re- 
ported, came up to second place. 
Nine of the one hundred and eleven 
hours carried were reported. 

Seven of the twenty-four Lambda 
Chi's were reported, or a total of 
twenty-nine per cent. Of their fou 
hundred and two hours carried, thir- 
ty were reported as unsatisfactory. 

The Alpha Chi's had five or thirty- 
five per cent of their fourteen girls 
reported. Twenty-one of two hun- 
dred and twenty-three hours were re- 
ported as unsatisfactory. 

Of the sixteen K. A.'s, eight or 
fifty per cent were reported. Thir- 
teen per cent, or thirty-seven of their 
two hundred and sixty-seven hours 
were reported. 

The Theta Chi's hit a new low with 
fifty-two-per cent or ten of their 
nineteen members turned in to the 
Dean. Of the three hundred and 
twenty-one hours carried forty-eight 
or fourteen and nine-tenths percent 
were reported. 



Bridgetender Bill . . . 

(Continued from Page 2) 
lives exactly two miles from the cen- 
ter of the town — out in the country. 
He is the father of nine children, one 
of which is in the army. He didn't 
mind his son being in the army, as 
long as he stayed over here, but he 
didn't want him in Europe. "Ain't 
lost nothin' over there," he said, "and 
I ain't goin' to look for anything — 
in wartime." 

His chief ambition is to get a trail- 
er, enough money to last a year, and 
then travel all over the United States 
and "see everything." 



Bob Strong had added some "prov- 
en" men to his climbing band, Shorty 
Cherock of Jimmy Dorsey and Krupa 
fame, entered as featured trumpeter, 
and Johnny Mince, of the T. D. clan 
signed as saxist and solo clarinetist. 



D O R F ' S 
DEPARTMENT 

STORE 
High Street 



PAINT 



for EVERY nee-d 

"Time-Tested Products" 

The Glidden Company 

21 N. Liberty Street 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



Seven To Take 
Tests Dec. 15th 

Seven students — the largest group 
ever — have signed up with Dr. Liv 
ingood to take the medical aptitude 
test to be given here December 15 

These tests were first given at the 
College in 1931; they have been giv- 
en every year since. Usually, only 
three or four students took the test, 
Dr. Livingood asserted. It is a two- 
hour test, covering pre-medical know- 
ledge specifically, although occasion- 
ally it also includes general informa- 
tion. 

The tests are given by Dr. Livin- 
good, after which he sends them to 
Dr. George Moss, psychologist 
George Washington University, who 
makes up the tests, as well as direct- 
ing the work. Dr. Moss and his staff 
do the actual checking; the results 
are then submitted to all the members 
of the American Association of Medi- 
cal Schools. The direct results are 
not given to the students themselves. 

Those who have informed Dr. Liv- 
ingood of their intention to take the 
test are James Diacumakos, Marian- 
na Wintner, Ernest Larrnore, Henry 
Maguire, Peter de Palma, Norman 
Sharrer and Charles Wieneke. 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



MON. - TUES. - WED., DEC. 1-2-3 

— Another Masterpiece — 

IRENE DUNNE-ROBERT MONTGOMERY 

PRESTON FOSTER 

— in — 

"UNFINISHED BUSINESS" 

Why can't men understand that the past 
. . . those memories of romantic moments 
cannot be erased by a new love. It's what 
every woman knows and won't tell. 



THUR. - FRI. - SAT., DEC. 4-5-6 

— BIG DOUBLE FEATURE SHOW— 

Daring Days and Exotic Nights 

"SOUTH OF TAHITI" 

with 

MARIA MONTEZ - BRIAN DONLEVY 

BROD CRAWFORD - ANDY DEVINE 

— Plus— 

THE THREE MESQUITEERS 

— in — 

"SADDLEMATES" 



KJut our wai/.../f n 

Chesterfield 

Out on the range 

it's "Howdy pardner, have a Chesterfield" 
That's true Western hospitality. 



For bringing smokers together, giving 
them exactly what they want, Chesterfield's 
right combination of the world's best ciga- 
rette tobaccos is right at the top. 

There is more downright pleasure in 
Chesterfield's COOL MILDNESS and BETTER TASTE 
than in anything else you ever smoked. 

Make your next pack Chesterfield 





A World Champion 

Rodeo Rider 

EDDIE CURTIS 









iRIEF 



Scientists Join In Assembly 

Representing the three science de- 
rtments, twelve committeemen 
hre appointed at the Science Club 
leting on Wednesday, to confer 
it h their part in the annual Assem- 
|y program, March 5. 
Members of the committees arc: 
ministry — Andrew Gorman, Ollie 
ttleton, and Ted Kurze; Physics — 
lb Carter, Martin Engle, Robert 
irriaon, and Harold English; Biol- 
-Naomi Russell, Maria Petry, 
aiianna Everngam, and Norman 




Vol. XLI. No. 11. WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1941 Price Five Cents 



W. Sponsors Exhibit rSmilin 5 Through" Opens 

Of 100 Christmas Cards Players' Season Tonight 



Historians Plan Assembly 

Wednesday evening the Historical 
ciety discussed plans for an assem- 
y on February 5, and for a Christ- 
as party to be held on December 17 
Hodxon Hall. 

About twelve members of the So- 
|cty went to Annapolis last Sunday, 
visited the Chapel, Crypt and 
m of the Naval Academy, St. 
Academy campus and the State 
puse. One very interesting sight 
the middies ringing the Japanese 
pll on the steps of Bancroft Hall, 
ell is only brought out and rung 
li Navy victory over Army at 
nual football game. 
Dr. Dole, Miss Snodgrass, Miss 
Jley and Mr. William Meadows 
ccompanied the group. 



Yule Cards Of National Fame 

To Be Shown In Library 

From Today To 18th 



A. A. Changes Tennis Ruling 

An amendment to the A. A. consti- 
Btion, changing the number of mat- 
hes necessary for a varsity tennis 
r to participate in to receive a 
, was approved after assembly 
hursday by the student body. The 
tnendment, brought before the stu- 
nts by Dave Bartolini, president of 
ic A. A., states that any varsity 
nnis player must now play in one 
If of the total number of matches 
ihoduled in order to receive a letter, 
placing the old ruling which requir- 
1 only one match. 

"W" Club To Induct 15 

Fifteen men will be formally in- 
1 into the Varsity Club in the 
initiation, Wednesday night, 
joining are: 
William H. Benjamin, Walter 
randt, Bob Carter, Jim Dougherty, 
nk Gibe, Frank Macielag, Henry 
laguire, Francis McLaughlin, Wil- 
li' . ■ Patterson, Wilson Riedy, Frank 
;le, Ray Sinclair, George Sohl, 
Souder, and Lewis Yerkes. 



Calvert Jones Is Editor 

Calvert Jones, editor of the ELM, 
cted as editor of the Chestertown 
iiterprise this week in the absence 
Editor Harry S. Russell who was 
ending the annual meeting of the 
latinnal Association of Professional 
iseball Leagues at Jacksonville, 



ROAR, BIG RED, ROAR 

Tune: ROAR LION ROAR 

Words by Robert Corley 

So won't you ROAR, BIG RED, 

ROAR, 
And shake the old colonial walls 

with thunder; 
Fight on for victory evermore, 
While your loyal sons and dau- 
ghters gather round. 
Oh! Washington, 
Old Washington, 
Shouting her name forever — 
ROAR, BIG RED, ROAR, 
Our alma mater on the Eastern 
Shore. 
Please try to learn these 
rords as sooo as possible. We 
fould like to use this song at 
our basketball garnet. Thank 
you. 



Under the sponsorship of the Y. 
W. C. A., "100 Christmas Cards That 
Are Works of Art" will be displayed 
in the Museum Room of the Library. 
The exhibition, obtained by special 
arrangement with the American Art- 
ists Group, will open this afternoon 
and may be visited any week-day 
from 3 to 5 P. M., or from 1 to 5 P. 
M. on Saturdays, through Decembei 
18. 

Within the past few weeks ex- 
tremely favorable notice has been 
given these cards in various national 
magazines. In the display each card 
is mounted separately and accompan- 
ied by a short descriptive write-up. 
Orders for cards may be placed 
through Phyllis Peters, president of 
the Y. W. 

Cards Are By Modern Artists 

The men and women who compose 
the roster of the American Artists 
Group comprise the most gifted and 
widely acclaimed creators in the 
present day renaissance of art in our 
country. A fractional enrollmest in- 
cludes such national personalities as 
John Taylor Arms, Thomas Benton. 
Alexander Brook, John Steuart Cur- 
y, AdnlfflCchn, Guy Pene du Bois, 
Kerr Eby, Lauren Ford, Emil Ganso, 
Wanda Gag, J. W. Golinkin, A. T. 
Hibbard, Rockwell Kent, J. J. Lankes, 
Ernest Fiene, Dale Nichols, Lionel 
Reiss, John Sloan, and R. W. Woices- 
ke. Whether in painting, sculp- 
ture, or print-making, these artists 
transfix the high esthetic moments of 
their environment. Their works as 
a whole, in this composite exhibit, are 
a loving revelation of the spiritual 
unity of America, as well as of the 
magnitude of its artistic achievement. 

New Type Is Included 

To encourage the growing appre- 
ciation for sculpture, the American 
Artists Group, this year, for the first 
time, has included three dimensial re- 
productions of famous American 
sculptural works in its Christmas 
Card collection. Among the dis- 
tinguished sculptors represented are: 
Paul Manship, Heinz Warnekie, Jos- 
eph Nicolosi, Warren- Wheelock, Rob- 
ert Laurent, Harry Wickcy, Mahonri 
Young, and William Zorach. The 
subjects of the sculptural pieces range 
from typical scenes of contemporary 
life to interpretations of the Madon- 
na and Child in both the conventional 
and modern spirit. 

Many Examples Are Humorous 

Of a different character are the 
show's numerous examples of Design- 
ers and Illustrators Christmas Cards. 
Among these, lightness and bright- 
ness frequently give a fillip to the 
work. Through apt, brilliantly exe- 
cuted illustration, the artist gently 
chafes some foible of his fellow-man, 
or extols his cheerful mien in a world 
of trouble. Traditional holiday 
themes are treated in a manner that 
is frothily gay, fanciful, often hilar- 
iously riotous when executed by such 
reigning masters of the designers and 
illustrators art as: Bemelmans, Bob- 
ri, Lucille Coroos, Witold Gordon, 
John Groth, Barney Tobey, Hendrik 
Willem van Loon and Edward A. Wil- 
son. 



Y. M. C. A. Room Talented Pianist 

Is Made Lounge Plays In Chapel 



Non-Fraternity Men To Receive Bach, Beethoven, And Chopin 
Long Awaited Social Room Provide Musical Program 



The YMCA room under East Hall 
has been recently refinished by the 
Administration through the efforts of 
President Nagler. It will serve not 
only the purpose of a club and meet- 
ing room, but also a lounging room 
for non-fraternity men. 

The floor and walls have been 
painted, and with the addition of cur- 
tains, lamps, and a few chairs, the 
YMCA hopes to convert it into an at- 
tractive room. 

Terry Burroughs and Pete Shin- 
naman were named a decorating com- 
mittee to secure necessary equip- 
ment for improving the room. 

Several other committees were ap- 
pointed by President Nagler at then- 
last meeting. The committee in 
charge of the YMCA Christmas fes- 
tivities, which is an annual feature, 
consists of: Harry Roe, Harry Myer, 
Elroy Boyer, John Harris and Ver- 
non Dowling. Dr. Coop's phono- 
graph will be used again this year by 
the "Y" to broadcast across the cam- 
pus recordings of Christmas carols. 

Charles Nairn, chairman of the 
Employment Bureau, stated that he 
will contact presidents of the Wom- 
en's Clubs, Business Men's Associa- 
tion, and the Rotary Club in order to 
start the Bureau functioning. War- 
ren Hodges was also placed on this 
committee and was assigned to make 
a survey of individual merchants and 
hand in a report at the next meeting. 

In order that the Bureau may 
function efficiently, it is necessary 
that all applications and students' 
schedules of work be submitted im- 
mediately, Nairn announced. 



Miss Charlotte Rossberg, well- 
known pianist in Baltimore musical 
circles and a graduate of Peabody 
Conservatory of Music entertained at 
the assembly Thursday with a varied 
program including works of Bach, 
Beethoven, and Chopin. 
, Miss Rossberg, who made her Bal- 
timore musical debut for this season 
several weeks ago, was a student at 
Peabody for fourteen years. For the 
past seven years she has-been teach- 
ing piano. 

Any pianist who comes to the Col- 
lege has the great disadvantage of 
not knowing the touch of the piano or 
the acoustics of the auditorium, but 
Miss Rossberg overcame these beau- 
tifully. She showed the ability of a 
real musical student at the piano, dis- 
playing a skillful technique, strong 
fingering and a solid interpretation. 

Miss Rossberg's choice of selections 
is unique in that they comprise a sur- 
vey of classical music, from the be- 
ginning classics of Bach and Beeth- 
oven to_ the present-day music of Pro- 
kofieff. The first series of the pro- 
gram was as follows: Chromatic Fan- 
tasy and Fugue, Bach; Two Move- 
ments from Beethoven's Sonata in E- 
Major; Chopin's Nocturnes in E-FIat 
Major, followed by his Revolutionary 
Etude, which concluded the first ser- 
ies. 

During the interlude which follow- 
ed, Mort Garrison played two violin 
selections, accompanied by Emmajo 
Stubblefield. The numbers were 
Mozart's Concerto in A, Second 
Movement and a special arrangement 
of "Nobody Knows The Trouble I've 
Seen," a spiritual. 



Dr. Tolles Continues Tradition 

Of Getting Good Results, 

Rehearsal Indicates 



All-College Night Wins Applause 
For Precedent - Setting Cabaret 



Last Saturday was a red letter day 
in the college's social calendar. All 
College Night, something entirely dif- 
ferent, took the campus by storm and 
is still receiving its rightful approval 
from the students and the administra- 
tion. 

The highlight of the evening was 
the coronation of the first King and 
Queen of Washington College. After 
a short, but impressive, ceremony 
Dr. Mead crowned Dave Bartolini 
and Minor Steele. They were elect- 
ed by the student body and a very 
special congratulation to them from 
the Elm which sponsored the contest. 

In his coronation speech, Dr. 
Mead expressed his desire that All 
College Night become a Washington 
tradition. He confirmed it today by 
saying emphatically, "I think it was 
swell." He spoke on behalf of the 
administration which sounds as if 
they approve. Needless to say — the 
students agree. 

The idea was instigated by the 
ELM, a non-profit affair, and with the 
cooperation of campus leaders, a new 



entertainment resulted. A cabaret 
theme was carried to the nth degree 
— even to the bar (strictly non-alco- 
holic) and waiters (sorry, no cigar- 
ette girls) . Master-of-Ceremonies, 
Jim Criss, made himself famous for 
his jokes — to say nothing of the fac 
ulty prophecy. Maybe it's just as 
well he is leaving in February — our 
loss and the Army's gain. To furth- 
er the night club idea, a floor show 
was planned. The three buxom hula 
dancers were guaranteed to be im- 
ported directly from Hawaii, but 
there was a close resemblence to Jer 
ry Sohl, Frank Evans and Irving 
Braunstein. A Russian trio compos 
ed of some very rare characters en- 
tertained with native songs and danc- 
es. Underneath the disguises were 
Omar Jackson, Rudy Parks, and Otts 
Howard. 

A special mention should be given 
to Frank Mead and his orchestra 
who made their debut in furnishing 
the music for the dancing. They'll 
go far — want to bet? 



by Phyllis Peters 

"Smilin 1 Through" will open the 
1041-42 program of the Washington 
Players in William Smith Hall tonight 
at 8. 

Last night your reporter sat 
through the final full rehearsal of the 
play. It is indeed a pleasure to wit- 
ness a production whicli Dr. Tolles 
brings to life with only the meager 
material with which he has to work. 
Again he has come forward with a 
few unknown Washington ians who 
tonight will be different people in a 
world of the imagination. 

Players Need Audience 

Tonight we hope that the cast will 
overcome the individualism of re- 
hearsal and pull together. Last night 
a missed cue resulted in arguments, 
although improvisation frequently 
would have made up for a muffed 
line. The players probably need the 
stimulus of a real audience, 

Joan Johnston plays the leading 
role, Kathleen, with an attempt at a 
County Clare accent. Throughout 
the scenes she is herself, except for 
the accent which at times gets very 
much in her way. It is obvious from 
her tendency to over-act that she 
lacks experience. Her best scene last 
night was that in which Kenneth 
Wayne (Lloyd Davis) returns from 
the war. Here she gives a highly sat- 
isfactory playing of a difficult series 
of highly emotional reactions. 

Revelle Plays Difficult Role 

Bill Revelle who plays the most dif- 
ficult role — old man, young man, 
sympathetic, harsh — will probably 
know his lines by tonight and get the 
cotton out of his mouth. Strangely 
enough for a ministerial student, his 
love scenes were "more shallow than 
those in which he had a chance to 
storm and rage. As Sir John Carter- 
et he is the hero of the piece. 

Lloyd Davis plays both Kenneth 
and Jeremiah Wayne, and does the 
father, Jeremiah, better than the son. 
The father is the better part with 
more substance to it. As Kenneth he 
is always Lloyd Davis, 

Henry Lyon seems well cast in the 
role of the doctor, Owen Harding, but 
his acting does not reveal the char- 
acter. Last night his scenes were 
uneven ; his best during the return 
of Kenneth Wayne, his poorest at the 
very beginning when he quarrels with 
Sir John in a stiff, unconvincing fash- 
ion. 

In the supporting cast Betty Hill 
takes the honors. In fact, she does 
as much with an insignificant role as 
any one could hope. Moonyean ap- 
pears only in the second act, except 
to return at the end of the play as a 
ghost. As a ghost she may remind 
you of the Emily of the death scene 
in "Our Town," but at no time was 
she the Emily of that play but always 
a distinctly different person, the 
Moonyean of this. 

Set Is Rustic Garden 

The set is of a rustic English gar- 
den — rural England but a formalized 
garden. As usual the small stage 
presents difficulties. 

As usual, the lighting is well hand- 
led. The pale blue spot for the death 
scenes creates the most impressive ef- 
fect. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, ,, 



Member 

Plssocided GoUe6iate Press 

Distributor of 

Cblle6iateDi6est 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 
420 MADISON Ave. New York. N.Y 

CHICAGO • Socio. - Los A1GCLCS ■ S»« FHAHCISCO 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief v J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. 0. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1941 


Desk Editor . 






Assistants 









We Wish To Thank Yon 

Last Saturday night marked the debut of what may be- 
come an annual event, All-College Night. The festivities, un- 
der the sponsorship of the ELM, were a distinct social success. 
The coronation of Mr. and Miss Washington was impressive and 
the ELM is glad to congratulate the lucky couple. The music 
of Frank Mead's orchestra ranked with the best heard here for 
a long time. The floor show was entertaining and the remarks 
of the Master of Ceremonies about the faculty were enlighten- 
ing. 

Many people deserve credit for their part in the occasion. 
Sara Blackwood and Jean Leland make a realistic night club 
out of the Gym. Dave Bartolini handled the Popularity Con- 
test Ellen Peters was responsible for the coronation. Basil 
Clark was responsible for chaperons. Lloyd Davis deserves 
credit for the bar. Jim Stevens was in charge of the tickets 
and table plan. Ray Kirby did a wonderful job in acquiring 
tables. Harry Lore managed the publicity for the. occasion. 
Ed Palder controlled the lights. Mary Liz Humphries furnish- 
ed the presents for the winners. Jimmy Dougherty was in 
charge of the cloak rooms. 

The 'ELM expresses extreme gratification to Dr. Mead for 
his part in the coronation and to Dr. Livingood for allowing 
smoking in the Gym. 




NORTHEAS' 
^CORNEl 



• REUNION • 

WHENTHE773 CONGRESS CON- 
VENED. TWO EX-COLLEGE (BOM- 
»WES RENEWED AN OLD ACQUAINT- 
ANCE. CAKEERS OF SEN BURTON 
OF OHIO AND SEN. BREWSTER OF 
MAINE ARE PARALLEL. BOTH 
ATTENDED THE SAME COLLKE 
BOTH ARE DEKES, BOTH WERE 
ELECTED TO THE U.S.SENATE ON 
THE REPUBLICAN TICKET IN THE 
SAME ELECTION.' 



Where 
Were You? 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



A HECTIC WEEK 
INTRAMURALS 

THIS 'N* THAT 

After a hectic week of taking cave 
of two newspapers and trying to do a 
good job as general chairman of All- 
College Night, it is indeed a pleasure 
to settle down to the rhythmic click- 
ing of typewriter keys. The success 
which All-College Night apparently} let anyone be fooled by 



"big tit 
the Cart 
underst 
rary fat 

place for 
"Dutch" 



Many ears were burning Saturday 
night, and there were many revela- 
tions concerning 1 our teachers — my, 
my, never knew it was possible, did 
you, Jim Criss was an excellent 
emcee, and the "Mad Russians" 
whooped it up considerably. Last 
but not, by far, the least, were the im- 
ported hula "girls". We'd spend our 
money on them any time! The cloak 

room idea was good — but the added. But we were wrong, 
expense seemed rather beside the j The idea to have a dance after the 
point. That, is one of the accom-j basketball games at the armory, the 
modations that should and has been money to go to the hospital, would be 
free on some previous occasions. Oh] both beneficial and fun. Although 
yes, where did all the money go? j many saw the movie "Smilin' 
Frank Mead's orchestra lived up to | Through", the play this Friday night 
all expectations and we think it will will undoubtedly be well patronized. 



The Varsity club will be initiating 
fourteen boys sometime soon and 
from the sounds of the laughter issu- 
ing from Room 21 the other day, the 
jokes are going to be on someone! 
The girls are quite disturbed about 
their dance which had been scheduled 
for the 13th, because there has been 
a home basketball game scheduled 
with Salisbury for that night. The 
Intramural basketball games have 
brought to light the fact that many of 
the boys aren't in what one might 
call, "good condition", but just wait 
until the girls start next week! To 
whom it may concern: Hick's arm will 
be alright very soon. There was 
smoke out "that way" the other day 
and we all thought — guess what?? 



"' 'j 



ne." When we returned to 

tpus Wednesday afternoon, we 

ood that Mr. Coleman of lib- 

ne was on t o warp at against be yery nJce to haye & schooi orches . The new pIayers wil i be hiving the: 

no would make the library a «■--- <■ 



enjoyed makes it 
for the student 
seemed to have a 

which should be sufficient remunera- 
tion for the many students who spent 
much of their time putting it over. 
To mention a few, special praise 
should go to the decorating commit- 
tee of Jean Leland and Snooks Black- 
wood, Frank Mead's orchestra, and 
the floor show. Mrs. Lawrence still 
wonders what the Mad Russians had 
in those bottles. 

Speaking of Mrs. Lawrence reminds 
us that we just heard that she just 
bought the first round-trip ticket to : 
Baltimore via the newly established 
air service between these two points. I 
Could it be that she's in a hurry to j 
leave us. Not Mother Layrence, 
hardly. We had a little fling at the 
Enterprise this week and we must say 
that it is enjoyable to work once in a 
while on a paper somewhat larger 
than the Elm. It is comparatively 



gatherings. Coach 
hott has a scheduled 
pre-season game with Salisbury State 
Teachers College for Saturday night, 
13th, in the Armory. Incidentally, 
that's the night the girls have schedul- 
ed for their dance. 

Intramural basketball started with 
an upset this year when an inspired 
Frosh quint beat the Lambdas by one 
point. We predict that this one vic- 
tory will be their undoing. Over 
confidence is a great thing. Don't 
this game. 



tra for a change. 



i first chance to "make good.' 



Team In Swarthmore Debate Tells 
How It Feels To Face The Mike 



pleasure to work 1 The Lambdas still have one of the 
body. Everyone i best teams in the league and it's our 
wonderful time prediction, even at this early 

that they'll end up near the top. From 
the enthusiasm shown in intramural 
basketball and varsity basketball, 
that must be Washington College's 
sport. 

Under the head of this 'n' that 
would probably come this little joke 
on us. Several weeks ago, we repri- 
manded Mr. Johns for leaving his 
porch light on all night only to be in- 
formed this week that he merely got 
up at a respectable hour and turned it 
on. Shame on us late-risers. Christ- 
mas parties are the vogue these days. 
To date, we definitely know of seven 
that will be held on the Campus be- 
tween now and the 20th. 

We wonder why Washington Col- 
lege doesn't have some animal- it can 
call a mascot like all other colleges. 
Think it over. With this, we say — 
so long and thirty. 



by Don McClellan 

Last Saturday a young lady stepped 
into the waiting room of radio station 
WILM and, seeing the expressions of 
two sleepy' individuals, who slouched 
down in a leather couch on the oppo- 
site side of the room, began to back 
out quietly. Although the occupants 
of the couch knew her the only sign 
of recognition they showed was a 
withering glance. Yes — they knew 
and expected her; the trouble was 
that they had expected her for three 
and a half hours! 

After the necessary explanations 
the threesome were on their way back 
to Chestertown. I, who had occu- 
pied the couch with Jim Aycock, was 
asked how it felt to take part in a de- 
bate over the radio. We had met 
Swarthmore in a non-decision argu- 
ment on national defense. 

The rest of the trip was spent hop- 
ing the bridge would be up at Chesa- 
peake City so that we would be forc- 
ed to detour one block west. 

Since then, the question which 
Helen Marie Culver, our chauffeur 
for the day, had asked, has returned 
and demanded an adequate reply. 

Although Jim Aycock and I had 
both had previous experience with 
the radio, in high school and in col- 



lege, we are agreed that there is an 
unknown something about being 
tangled up with a microphone which 
will forever make throat-clearing 1 , 
key chain twirling, and browmopping, 
necessary behavior. A regular an- 
nouncer at WILM still ties knots in 
his handkerchief. 

There is a great difference between 
speaking to a seen and to an unseen 
audience. When one is talking to a 
visible audience and an unanswerable 
question is raised the speaker can 
cover his shame by an expression 
which passes for profound thought 
That same expression, when cast intc 
the still, unseeing eye of the radio, 
tells the audienee that the speaker k 
in the midst of a very embarrassing 
silence, 

This is undoubtedly the wrong im- 
pression to give a might-be interested 
radio audience, and it is this sort of 
pause which all amateurs and a great 
percentage of the professionals are 
forever worried about. In fact, be- 
ing troubled by such possible mis- 
takes, the speaker often gets off on a 
side-track with a dead end. At times 
the speaker might even be altogether 
de-railed, but he can always console 
himself by saying, when the ordeal is 
over, "Well, no one was listening 
anyway — I hope." . 



A Washington College studeaffl 
showing a friend from his home | 
over the campus and buildings, 
the Library he pointed to the m 
on the right and snid, "That's P. 
a Signer of the Declaration of [„ 
pendencc, laying the cornerstone 
the original Washington Col 
building. You know it was ' the j 
college building in Maryland, am! 
boast the first college charter and 
first college commencement in 
state." To which his friend venli 
"So what?" 

And to that, unfortunately, 
Washingtonian had no reply yxct 
the very feeble retort, "Well, 
makes us pretty old." 

The funny-paper idea of i 
furniture is always that it 
adoration of doting women, but t 
lapses when an average 
down on it. Age is no substitute 1 
present-day usefulness as long as t 
piece stays out of a museum, Tl 
as true of a college as of nn i 
chair or sofa. 

But age can add something w 
age alone can supply. To the 
cient modern meeting of present 
demands in education, age in a 
lege can add a sense of solidity in 
trembling world. It can sum 
present and insistent problems i 
an atmosphere permeated by the Id 
successes of our predecessors. It a 
provide a feeling of continuity whi 
daily tells us that we are a portion 
an ancient and continuing tradff 
of greatness. It can add to then 
rent mastery of our tasks the kne 
ledge that many generations of o 
predecessors found the college sul 
cient for the needs of their day, 
conquer their problems in the ' 
in which they lived. 

The veritable antique whose pme. 
utility remains great under all chanj 
ing conditions is beautified by ; 
thing the experts call the "patina"- 
that deep and rich mellowness of li: 
ish which nothing can produce excel 
generations of use. A college a 
quires that patina, too. It com 
from the decades and centuries 
contact with the long procession 
young men and women who come! 
its halls. In rubbing off their inte 
lectual and social rough spots, the co 
lege itself acquires a polish which ti 
paint or veneer of a sudden mode: 
application can never give it. 

Have you ever seen that moder 
furniture advertisement which dl 
clares its product as "the antiques 
tomorrow?" There is an impli 
tion there of sound workmanship, pel 
feet utility, present grace and beanfl 
which will combine to perpetual 
themselves for countless years. Agai: 
the college is no different from tfc 
chair. 

When Schiller went to Weimar, 
was appointed to a professorship 
the neighboring University at Jcfl 
His introductory lecture was on tW 
question, "Why study Universal Hi* 
tory?" He concluded with thesi 
words : 

"A noble desire must glow i 
to add to the rich heritage of truth, 
morality and liberty transmitted to 
us by the past, to be augmented 
and passed on to the future, t 
make a contribution of our own t 
this never ending chain from gen- 
eration to generation." 
I should like someday to put thi' 
up as a motto to be seen and pondti' 

d by all Washington College A 
dents. It is a sufficient answer 
the "So what?" queries ctf the sW 
tic. 

Gilbert W. Meac 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Honorary Hockey Varsity Named; 
Senior Team Wins Championship 



Honor Won For Second Year 

By Newton, Rogers, Culver,^ 

Hoopes And Kreeger 

The following girls were picked as 
he Honorary Hockey Varsity by the 
joard of Managers of the G. I. A. A., 
Wednesday: 

L. Wing "Virginia Hoopes 

L, Inner "Catherine Newton 

Center Lois Stevens 

R. Inner "Frances Kreeger 

R. Wing "Helen M. Culver 

L. Half *Irma Rogers 

C. Half Laura Rainey 

R. Half Fiances Harris 

L. Full Betty Nash 

C, Full Sally Waesche 

R, Full Mary Nardi 

•Second year. 

Honorable Mention 
Betty Hill, Eleanor Newton. 

Seniors Win Championship 
Displaying the form which won 
hem the girls hockey championship, 
he Seniors overwhelmed the Fresh- 
Men 3 to 0. Much credit for the vic- 
:ory goes to the two stalwarts who 
lave played such brilliant hockey all 
iC ason — Lois Stevens and Kitty New- 
;on. Kitty was elected to the honor- 
[ry varsity for the second straight 
?ear. Lois, a transfer, clinched a 
tirth on the team in her first year 
fere. 

Juniors And Sophs Tie 

Had one of the goals made by Pete 
Hammond counted, the Sophomores 

ould have tripped the Juniors. As 
t happened, the game ended in a 1 to 
L deadlock. This year the Juniors 
lave tied two games and dropped one. 
The Sophomores can boast but one 
tie and two losses. 

Basketball To Start Soon 
Girls Intramural Basketball will 
commence next week, Miss Doris an- 
nounced Wednesday. Naturally it is 
a bit early to make predictions, but 

Frosh Down Lambdas 

As Sophs Also Win 

If the opening games of this year': 
Intramural Basketball tournament 
iave any significance, two teams look 
as if they should "burn up the le; 
gue." In the greatest upset of the 
season, a scrappy Freshman quintet 
upset the Lambda Chi team, last 
year's champions, 15-14. The Sopli 
omores looked very strong in tripping 
East Hnll 33-13. Kappa Alpha had 
little trouble in disposing of a weak, 
but fighting, Junior team by the score 
of 26-3. The Day Students smother 
ed Cain Hall 15-6 and the Senior; 
took a close one from West Hall, 24 
21. 



the Juniors should be more than a lit- 
tle dangerous. Nothing, of course, 
is known about the potential strength 
of the Freshmen team; but, because 
they have been playing together for 
a longer period of time, the upper- 
classmen should hold a definite ad- 
vantage over the first-year group. 



Meet Your Class Mates 

— at— 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



BARNETT'S 

BARBER SHOP 

IS^Upstairs Opposite Court 
House. 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration" 
Phone 48 



Let Us Play Santa Claus 

Come in and we'll help 
you shop or write us en- 
closing your Christmas 
list. Whichever way you 
choose to shop we'll gift 
wrap, mail or deliver your 
presents! 

HUTZLER BFQTHEKS €■ 



KENT COUNTY 

FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Phone 173 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sale? and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



Kent County Savings Bank 

Commercial and Savings 

Accounts 

Member Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



The First 
National Bank 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

LiBQU. S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 




No Cramming Necessary! 

For swell flavor and 

real chewing fun-the 

answer is delicious 

Wrigley's Spearmint Gum 



WHERE TO GO FOR ENTERTAINMENT 
"THE HOUSE OF HITS" 

CHURCHILL 

TWO SHOWS EVERY NIGHT 7 & 9 P. M. MAT. EVERY SAT. 
ALWAYS COMFORTABLE AT THE HOUSE OF HITS 

-ENTIRE WEEK- 

BEGINNING SAT., DEC. 6th 
Matinee Sat. - Tues. 2:00 P. M. 




GEORGE MURPHY 
WALTER RRENNAN 
LINDA DARNELL 
MILTON BERLE 



in Mark Hellinger's \ g"| | O 





ei if^a it 




PAGE FOOT 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, I941 



K 



ARDASH'S 
ORNER 



By 

John 
Kardash 



With the regular 1941 football season waning near its fin- 
ish the wiseacres are busy predicting the winners of the numer- 
ous Bowl Games scheduled on January 1. Out on the West 
' Coast, Oregon State's Beavers have already selected the Duke 
Blue Devils as their opponents in the most colorful football tus- 
sle of the 1942 season, the Rose Bowl game. Down in Dallas, 
Texas A. & M. will face the Crimson Tide of Alabama. The 
Fordham Rams and Missouri will battle it out down New Or- 
leans way in the Sugar Bowl Classic. Georgia's Bulldogs led 
by Frank Sinkwich, Broken jaw sensation, will invade the 
Orange Bowl to face Texas Christian. 

Meanwhile, State colleges are busily making preparations 
for the approaching 1941-42 Intercollegiate Basketball Season. 
Loyola, last year's runnerup for the State title, opened its cur- 
rent campaign with a victory over Towson Teachers. The 
Greyhounds have a veteran squad and are a definite contender 
for the '42 honors. Western Maryland, with several veterans 
returning, is out to cop the loop title for the second straight 
year. Not much as yet has been heard about the relative 
strength of Mount St. Mary's and Johns Hopkins. Maryland, 
although a member of the Southern Conference, is a local team 
and from early indications has a fine cron of rookies coming up 
plus four seasoned veterans to face a tough schedule. 

Coach Fred Dumschott is soundly drilling his squad in 
practice sessions with intensive grounding in fundamentals. 
Scrimmages follow these early drills, and the boys are being 
rapidly rounded into shape. Captain "Moose" McNiff has beon 
displaying a keen eye on outside shots and is the potential back- 
bone of the Maroon team work. Frank Samele, a member of 
the All-Maryland second team, appears to be in fine shape for 
another sparkling season. Jim Stevens and Lew Yerkes, the 
Sho'men speedsters, are performing in encouraging fashion. 
Bill Benjamin, because of his aggressiveness in snaring re- 
bounds, seems certain of the starting center berth. Others 
showing up well are Bob Ruff, a very promising Sophomore and 
Jerry Voith, freshman. Both boys are forwards and undoubt- 
edly will see plenty of action. 



All-Maryland Teams 



EKAITIS'S SELECTIONS 

End — Rogan, Mt. St. Mary's 
End — Benjamin, Washington 
Tackle — Foy, Mt. St. Mary's 
Tackle — Burlin, Maryland 
Guard — Kirby, Washington 
Guard — Morton, Maryland 
Center — Dudderar, Wash'tn. 
O. B. — Cordyack, Maryland 
H. B. — Yerkes, Washington 
H. B.— Asip, Mt. St. Mary's 
F. B. — Biasi, Western Md. 

SECOND TEAM 

Ends — 

Guskeski. 

Conrad, 
Tackles — 

Natalizi, 

Reidy, 
Guards — 

Gibe, 

Kitner, 
Center — 

Phillips, 
Quarterback — 

McLaughlin, 
Halfbacks — ■ 

Bricker, 

Skomoruch, 
Fullback — 

Wright, 



Western Md. 
Maryland 

Western Md. 
Washington 

Washington 
Western Md. 

Western Md. 

Washington 

Western Md. 
Blue Ridge 

Maryland 



KARDASH'S SELECTIONS 

End — Rogan, Mt. St. Mary's 
End — Conrad, Maryland 

Tackle — O'Connor, Mt.St. M. 
Tackle — Burlin, Maryland 
Guard — Kirby, Washington 
Guard — Morton, Maryland 
Center — Phillips, West. Md. 
Q. B. — Yerkes, Washington 
H. B. — Biasi, Western Md. 
H. B.— Hall, Mt. St. Mary's 
F. B. — Wright, Maryland 

ALL-OPPONENT 

Ends — 

Rogan, Mt. St. Mary's 

Moberg, Randolph-Macon 
Tackles — 

O'Connor, Mt. St. Mary's 

Jackson, Randolph-Macon 
Guards — 

Bogovich, 

Coulter, 
Center — 

Mullen, 
Quarterback — 

Paul, 
Halfbacks — 

Bartholomeo, 

Eisenberg, Rand.-Macon 
Fullback — 

Hartnett, P. M. C. 



Delaware 
Ursinus 



Delaware 
Delaware 



P. M. C. 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
— For — 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A complete line supplies plus all text* 
For all classes 



Teachers Invade 
Armory On 13th 

Veteran Quintet Will Start 
Against Salisbury 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Tydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors ■ Builderi 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campus Avt 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



The Maroon Cagers will oppose: 
Salisbury Teachers in the initial I 
game of the 1941-42 season. Play- 
ing at the Armory on December 13, 
the encounter will replace the orig- 
inally scheduled Girls Dance. 

It is probable that Coach Dum- 
schott will build the team around Mc- 
Niff and Samele, both of whom were 
dependable ball players. Benjamin, 
rangy center, will probably start in 
the spot vacated by Fetter. Bill, a 
hard worker and a good ball-handler, 
has a knack of snaring rebounds. 
Yerkes, a letter-man last season, 
should develop into a capable man 
under the coaching of 'Dutch" Dum- 
schott. Last season Lou was very 
erratic — in some games he was sen- 
sational, in others just average. Stev- 
ens should furnish the opposition with 
more than a little trouble this season. 
Jim is a fast man on the floor, a good 
ball-handler, and possesses a good 
eye for the basket. 

Gibe should be an asset to the team 
this year. Improving rapidly at the 
end of last season, Frank played 
"heads up" ball in the last few games. 
Voith, a Freshman, has been looking 
good in practice and may push some 
of the more experienced boys. 



*N\%V*X\VWCViS»«XVS**V^XV\VA^^ 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., DEC. 8-9-10 

— The First Thin Man Hit In Two Years — 

WILLIAM POWELL - MYRNA LOY 

— in — 

"SHADOW OF THE THIN MAN" 

Just what you've been waiting for. 
They're at it again and funnier than ever. 
You have waited TWO years for this new 
THIN MAN picture and it was worth wait- 
ing for. A laugh loaded hit. 

WED. - THUR. - FRI., DEC. 11-12-13 
The Year's Biggest Thriller 

"INTERNATIONAL LADY" 

— with — 

GEORGE BRENT - ILONA MASSEY 

BASIL RATHBONE 

SPIES - ADVENTURE - THRILLS 

Here's one of the year's biggest pictures. 

A picture abounding in headline thrills and 

heartline romance. The most exciting 

screen adventure you have ever seen. 

—NEXT WEEK- 
ABBOTT and COSTELLO in 
"KEEP 'EM FLYING" 



\ 



urry 



• • 



That is a word that usually accompanies 
every printing order in practically all print- 
ing plants. For printing to be well done a 
definite time limit should be allowed and 
YOU are the one that suffers when you 
shorten that time. 

Don't rush your printer to death . . . give 
him a little time and he'll do you a good job. 

P. S. We are equipped to give you 
anything in the printing line 
at anytime yon say . . . and if 
it has to he rushed — we'll rush 
it. 



The Queen Anne's Record & Observer 
Publishing Company 

Centreville Phone One 



"V" 



Ine 







"V" 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD„ FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1941 



Vol. XLI. No. 12. 



Price Five Cents 



"There's Work To Be Done At Home Until 
You Are Called For Other Service" -Mead 
"American Youth Best In World" -Kibler 

President Gilbert W. Mead, speaking in Thursday's assembly on the war situation, said, "There is work to be done at home until yon 
are called for other service." He emphasized the importance of working on a rigorous college schedule until the time comes for active military 
duty. He expressed the belief that all college students would do their patriotic duty then. The president said that due to the foresight of our 
leaders the nation is better prepared today than in 1917 and added that the colleges are also better prepared to do their part. 

He then called upon Coach Thomas Kibler, head of the athletic department and a member of the local draft board, to speak. Coach 
Kibler amplified the president's opinion of the students role. He said that students should immediately begin to "get in shape." Citing the ex- 
ample of his own son, now at Washington and Lee, Kibler said that he wanted him to continue his education until the age group from eighteen to 
twenty-one is called. At that time his son will volunteer for military service. 

Coach Kibler said that the American youth can do things better than anybody else in the world. He closed his remarks by saying, 
"Who's going to win? We're going to win. God bless all of you." Coach Kibler served as an officer in the World War and ended his service 
in the rank of a captain. He suffered wounds and received the Distinguished Service Cross for valor. He has volunteered for service in the 
present war. 



Northeast Corner 

An Editorial 

The whole world is at war. It has 
been entangled for some time in 
economic conflict which lacked 
only the world-wide use of military 
force, bombs and battleships to 
keep it from being actually a total 
conflict. Now America has been 
attacked, and we find ourselves in 
the active phase of a struggle in 
which lives and liberties as well as 
dollars are at stake. It will take 
the United effort of every one of us 
to support our armed forces to the 
victorious end. That victory will 
come, and we will then have the 
equally great job of mending the 
wounds of the torn world, and es- 
tablishing peace and justice. 

This war will not be won in a 
week or a month — or perhaps not 
a year. How many years will 
elapse before we can begin to en- 
joy peace once again, no one can 
now foretell. Civilian and soldier 
alike must recognize this as the 
first important fact to be faced. 

A second fact is that we will 
hamper progress of the campaign 
for victory and justice if we do not 
trust our leaders. America always 
has had to learn this fact the hard 
way. The fostering of hysteria 
and distrust of leadership is the 
great weapon of the "fifth column." 
When fundamentally good citizens 
let their emotions run away with 
their intelligences, the "fifth col- 
umnist" can rest at ease, knowing 
that his work is being done for him 
by the unwitting cooperation of 
others who are fundamentally 
sound in their patriotism, but er- 
ratic in their thinking. 

Civilian morale must be taught 
to operate on the same basis as the 
armed services. College trained 
men and women, the intelligent 
leaders of their communities, can 
help to spread the simple and basic 
rides, which are these: 

1. When orders are issued by 
superior authority, all should obey 
such orders promptly and effective- 

ly. 

2. "Getting off ahead of the 
gun" is likely to be as damaging as 
failure to obey when orders are 

i issued. 

3. Mass hysteria — a most de- 
structive force — comes only from 
collected individual hysterias. In- 
telligent realism in the face of a 



Alumnus Tells Tale Of Havana 




BULLETINS 



Civilian Defense Urges Review Of Courses 

The President's office has just announced that a communi- 
cation from the office of Civilian Defense, Washington, D. C, 
and signed by the Director of Civilian Defense has just been re- 
ceived listing various ways in which colleges and universities 
may cooperate in developing portions of the national program. 
In the course of the communication, the following statement ap- 
pears: "The Commission urges on the colleges and universities 
the need of reviewing existing courses and the development of 
new courses toward the building up of civilian morale ; but it al- 
so records its opinion that the normal values of education are 
still valid and that the primary function of the college and uni- 
versity is still, even in emergency, to give its students a sound 
education." 



Hugh Bradley, alumnus of Washington College, has just 
had a new book, Havana: Cinderella's City which is just being 
released by Double, Day and Doran, New York. Mr. Bradley's 
book is being reviewed in the ELM this week on page 3 by Pro- 
fessor Snyder. Havana: Cinderella's City is being presented to 
the library by the ELM. 



Mayor Orders Practice Blackout 

For Chestertown On Thursday 



A practice blackout for Chester- 
town, made at the request of Gover- 
nor Herbert R. O'Conor, state direc- 
tor of civilian defense, has been sche- 
duled for next Thursday, December 
18, between the hours of 6:30 and 
7:30 P. M. it was announced today by 
Mayor Philip G. Wilmer, Kent direc- 
tor of civilian defense. Cooperation 
of Washington College authorities and 
students is urgently requested. 

Mayor Wilmer, in announcing the 
blackout drill, said: "Due to Chester- 
town's position, one in the direct line 
of any attack by plane on Baltimore 
or Washington from the Atlantic, we 
feel it wise to carry out the Gover- 
nor's request for the practice black- 
out. Accordingly we have scheduled 
one for Thursday, December 18, be- 
tween the hours of 6:30 and 7:30 P. 
M. The exact moment of the black- 
out will not be revealed but all house- 



troubled situation is the only cure. 
The first necessary duty of all is 
(Continued on Page 2) 



holders in Chestertown are requested 
to turn off lights, or draw blinds se- 
curely, when the signal for the black- 
out is given. Everyone should re- 
main indoors during the period of the 
blackout drill. 

"The whistle at the Chestertown 
Electric Light and Power Company 
plant will sound three short blasts, 
pause one minute, repeat the three 
short blasts, pause one minute and re- 
peat the three short blasts again. This 
will be the signal for lights to be ex- 
tinguished. At the same time fire 
engines will leave the fire house for 
the outlying districts, sounding 
sirenes and bells. Automobiles on 
the streets when signal is sounded 
should pull to curb and extinguish 
lights. 

"The 'all-clear' signal will be three 
long blasts at one minute intervals 
sounded by the electric plant whistle. 
Then lights can be turned on." 



No Request Yet Made To Lower Draft Age 

As of Wednesday, the reports from Washington concerning 
legislative action on matters affecting service requirements show 
that the first move of the government has been to keep in ser- 
vice all men now in any branch, whether selectees, regularly en- 
listed personnel, or reservists. The House and the Senate Com- 
mittees on Military Affairs approved a bill to extend the period 
of their service to a date six months beyond the period of the 
present war emergency, and to make these men subject to ser- 
vice outside the Western Hemisphere. This bill is expected to 
be passed at once. 

While it has been suggested that the War Department 
might ask a change in the draft ages, making the limits 18 and 
45 years, official quarters at the Capitol emphasized that the 
legislative branch was making no such request at* the present 
time. If proposed later, it will come as an amendment to other 
Army and Navy legislation. 

By another bill, already passed by both House and Senate, 
the terms of enlistment for all enlisted men in the Navy were 
suspended, so that they are now to be held for the duration of 
the emergency. 

As regards Navy enlistments, the New York Times reports 
the testimony of Commander H. G. Hopwood before the House 
Naval Affairs Committee to the effect that a summary of enlist- 
ments show them running so high that the Navy will not have 
to make use of selectees. "The Navy is actually flooded with 
voluntary enlistments," Commander Hopwood said. 



Emergency Finds College Eager To Do Duty 

December 8. — "During all its long history, Washington 
College has met its responsibility to the nation in a complete 
and honorable way. There is no doubt that the present emer- 
gency will find the College no less eager to do whatever is re- 
quired of it at whatever cost. 

"It is well to remember that our government has declared 
that, in the emergency, of whatever duration it may be, the one 
great essential is the continuous flow of trained men in prepara- 
tion for leadership. When more college men are required in 
the armed forces they will be speedily notified and will, I am 
sure, respond instantly. 

Until that call comes, the clearest duty is for all to con- 
tinue a vigorous attack upon their regular college work. This 
in itself will be the hest and most patriotic service which can be 
rendered until such time as any call comes to another form of 
service." — President Gilbert W. Mead. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 194, 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 
Established 1782 
Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 



Member 

Associated CblleSiate Press 

Distributor of 

Golie6iaieDi 6est 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publisher! Repreicntativc 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N.V 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor . .' Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russe 1 

Sports Editor ' J° hn Kardash 

Business Staff ' 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. 0. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1941 



Desk Editor = ?■ p S tcls 

College NYA Appropriation Cut 

Due to certain national policies, the NYA appropriation 
for Washington College has been cut by a considerable amount. 
The College Administration sincerely regrets this but it cari_do 
nothing about the policies of the Federal government. 

In order to comply with this decrease in the appropriation, 
College NYA administrators are forced to reduce the working 
hours of those being aided. The reduction for December will 
be one-fourth and for each month after December,' one-third of 
the originally assigned amount. 

Copies of the letter received in the Business Office from the 
State NYA Office have been mailed to each student on the NYA 
payroll. In this time of national emergency it is up to each one 
of these students to receive this reduction as cheerfully as possi- 
ble. 



The ELM Apologizes To Miss Johnston 



to see 
success 



No one more than the editors of the ELM, wishes 
extra-curricular activities at Washington College a 
Certainly the article in last week's paper concerning the pro 
riuction of "Smilin' Through" by the Players did not aid this de 
sire. It is indeed unethical to examine critically a dress re 
hearsal. 

This article was no fault of its author for she had been in- 
structed to write it in that way. It could possibly be the result 
of a misunderstanding. However, its publication was due en 
tirely to the failure of the editor to ch-ick all copy. 

For this, the editor sincerely wishes to apologize to Miss 
Johnston especially, and to the entire membership of the Wash- 
ington Players in general. We are sure that Miss Johnston's 
wonderful portrayal of Kathleen makes up for anything that 
had been said against her. We hope that our article did no 
damage to the Players and we hasten to assure them that such 
a mistake shall not occur in our pages again. 




- Itei . 

DISTINGUISHED NKRO SCIENTIST, ~L 
HAS DIRECTED AGRICULTURAL * 
RESEARCH AT TOSKEGEE INSTI- 
TUTE FOR MORE THAN 39 YEAPS. I 
HE IS ONE OF THE MOST VEES4.TILE 
MEN IN THE COUNTRY TODAY. 




PRODUCTS FRWA Tile PEA- 
NUT INCLUDING MILK. PICKLE?, 
INK. SHAMPOO, DYES, COFFEE, 
LARD AND AXLE GREASE/ 
ALSO MADE 118 PRODUCTS 
FROM THE SWEET POTATO. 




E3n ACCOM- 
PLISHED ARTIST. 
HAS EXHIBITED 
PA1KTINSS ALL 
OVER WORLD/ 
HE WAKES Hir 
PAPER FROM PEANUT 
SHELLS. PAINTS' FKJM 
CLAY AND FRAMES ARE 
MADE FROM CORN HUS(S! 

• BUCKSHOT"' 

®VER 100 STUDENTS 
COMPRIZE THE STAFF OF 
THE MINNESOTA DAILY/ 



BJKILLED 
MUSICIAN - TOUR- 
ED U.S AS A 
CONCERT PIANIST.' 



©XPERT COOK- 
RECIPES ORIGINATED 
BY DR. CARVER. ARE 
USED IN LEADING 

HOTELS THROUGHOUT . 

•■•THE COUNTRY."- 







Since i870. when the u.s. office 

OF EDUCATION BEGAN COLLECTING 
STATISTICAL INFORMATION , SOME 

3,500,000 persons 

HAVE RECEIVED COLLEGE DEGREES.' 



The Editor's Desk 



This War And Us 



NORTHEAST 
=CORNER 



A Record On A Barber Shop 
Wall - The Flying Pentagon 

One of Washington College's tra- pennant twice under Flowers and 
ditions is inscribed not on the walls next year it is rumored that he will 
of Bill Smith but in the barber shop' again take over the coaching berth 
in Ghestertown. It is that of the after an absence of two years. Gimp 



The announcement of war on the 
United States came to the students of 
Washington College in a strange way? 
Many of them, even as late as Sun 
day night, could not believe that the 
news coming from every station on 
the radio was true. Orson Welles' 
ficticious Martian invasion had even 
a greater effect. 

Some oF the students, mostly those 
of draft age and their girl friends, 
stood in little knots here and there 
discussing the possibilities of being 
called. Everywhere, radios were 
tuned, not on Glen Miller and Jack 
Benny, but on the war news. Walk- 
ing from the KA House to Reid Hall 
and up through the three dormitories, 
I heard so many radios on the same 
news program that I didn't miss a 

The ones appearing most worried 
were those who had. brothers, fathers 
or other relatives in the bombed 
area, and they were jiot few. As for 
the students who are likely to be call- 
ed, they weren't missing a word of 
the war communiques and yet they 
were joking about it. One was heard 
to say, "We might as well joke about 
it now. Later we won't be able to." 
The feelings against the Japanese 
ore the same everywhere. One fel- 
low who had a brother in the bar- 

ks at Honolulu that were b 

<: 1 ■■ -l that he hoped 

were bombing th 
little yellow 



rith him. 



Flying Pentagon, a team which began 
as any other Washington College bas- 
ketball team and ended up the unde- 
feated champions of Maryland. It was 
coached by Thomas, Kibler who has 
jut relinquished the coaching berth 
■ ■n.Iy to Professor Dumsehutt. 
The original squad was composed 
of Carrington, Fiere, Carroll, Flow- 
ers, Johnson, Dumschott, Gordy, 
Bankert, Duffy, Lohran and Lovesky. 
Some of these men are still heard of 
in the spoiling world while few stu- 
dents at Washington College could 
mention their names. 

Jake Flowers is now a baseball 
coach known mostly to the Shore for 
his tutelage of the pennant winning 
Salisbury Indians. They won the 



Carrington is a coach of a small col- 
lege and Professor Dumschott isn't 
only known for Government and His- 
tory teaching at Washington College. 

The schedule that gave the Flying 
Pentagon its name began on a Mon- 
day with a g^me with" the U. S. Mar- 
ines at Quantico, Va. Throughout the 
week they played Washington and 
Lee, V. M. I., V. P. I., Catholic Uni- 
versity and Loyola, in that order and 
returned home at the end of the week 
undefeated. 

Whatever a Washington Colle 
quintet accomplishes it can always 
look to the tradition of the Flying 
Pentagon for inspiration, and who 
knows but what Professor 



the bull session agree' 

On Monday, lunches were gobbled 
down and some even went withou r. 
lunch so that they could hear the 
President's history making message 
to the joint houses of Congress. They 
cheered with the gallery and yelled 
"vote" during the speeches in the 
House debate. 

One group of boys brought out an 
American flag while his compatriots 
gathered around to listen to still 
another amateur bugler blow "To 
Arms." They didn't believe in mock 
patriotism but they wanted to get 
their hands on those damn Japs. 

Some have expressed their desires 
to go immediately while those that 
are subject to call at any moment are 
wondering what chances there are of 
securing a diploma if they go. In the 
last war, many colleges granted di- 
plomas to draftee seniors in good 
standing who would have graduated 
in June. Dr. Mead, in an official 
statement following the United 
States' declaration of War on Japan 
said that Washington College woul 
be eager to meet its responsibility to 
the nation in a complete and honor- 
able way. This honorable way may 
be interpreted as granting diplomas 
to drafted seniors in good standing. 
At any rate, many hope so and we be- 
ted lieve that the College, as it has al- 
ir fore-' ways done, will do its utmost for the 
hell out of those morale and convenience of its stu- 
— . Everyone in dents. 



Where 
Were You? 



Willie Paca feels that all that fly 
paper and coke bottles on the steps 
was "kid's stuff" . . . they weren't 
fooling him! Paddles were floating 
around the campus all Wednesday 
afternoon, waiting to be put in use 
that night. The secrets of initiation 
into the Varsity Club are still secrets, 
and all we know is what we saw the 
next day! And oh, what lovely hair- 
cuts! The campus was flooded with 
portable radios this past week, what 



with everyone trying to get the last 
Dumsehott' minute news flashes and listen to 
may produce the Flying Pentagon II. j President's speeches, some classes 



(Continued from Page 1) 

to keep on the present job until the 
demands of defense call you else 
where or change your duties j 
youi' present location. "Jitters 
mean lost effort, and inefficient sei 
vice. 

The production of trained intel. 
ligences is as important to the final 
welfare of the world as the produc- 
tion of material "weapons of de- 
fense. The industrial plants of 
America are going immediately on 
a seven-day week schedule. If the 
college students of America cared 
to undertake the effort, they could 
shorten their task by intensifying 
their effort, lengthening their 
hours, and eliminating the 
essentials from their schedules. Ij 
there any American college 
dent body willing, for the good of 
their country's future, to put 
themselves voluntarily onv-as rigop. 
ous a schedule as exists at Wesl 
Point or Ahrrapolis.-jiot to mention 
the rigorous day's duties of a man 
in naval or military training or act 
ive service? Are college student] 
"soft", as is_charged? " The pres- 
ent emergency will furnish tin an- 
swer. 

Collegians know the implications 
of the exhortation -to "Sfay on to 
ball." No government authority 
has as yet requested the colleges t( 
do anything else. When -it < 
we will do what we are called ( 
do. Until then, we serve best by 
serving where we are, at the limit 
of our capacity. 

—Gilbert W. Meat! 



were slightly disrupted. All for f 
I good cause though. 

Jean Philips is feeling fine now af- 
ter her appendectomy on Monday, so 
she can have callers anytime. Blue 
Book week seems to have a tendency 
to start every Monday — or so it seems. 
Notice- Ann and Walt_are pining 
away for each other. Jerry and Jim 
have practised landing and taking off 
for quite some time now, so those 
final papers aren't worrying them at 
all. 



A daughter was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Omar W. Scott on December 
5th. Scott was a member of the 
class of 1940. 



A practice blackout in Chester- 
town next Thursday night, December 
18, between the hours of 6:30 and 
7:30 P. M. The announcement came 
from Mayor Phillip G. Wilmer at the 
request of Governor O'Conor. 



Dean's List Is 
Big Advantagi 

Those students whose industiioi 
aptitude towards study has givi 
them a 2.6 index or better have 
last gained the special consideratio 
of the privilege of taking unlimfo 
cuts from their classes. This yefll 
Dean's List has been provided to t3ll 
care of such superior students. Fro 
the students viewpoint it is an exo 
lent plan and they are -for it v/hol 
heartedly. The main benefit derii 
from this plan by the member of to 
Dean's List is that they may cut da: 
es whenever they feel that it is neo 
sary for them to make up import* 
work or study for coming tents. Tl 
plan as well as being a help to 
members, is an honor to those v 
names appear on the "List." 

Dr. Livingood states that with o 
or two exceptions no one on 
Dean's List has taken advantage 
his enviable .position to overcut, 
suiting in the falling off of his wor 
Furthermore any student in 
group, although his index may flj 
rant it, may be dropped off the li 
for "a month or two if he continual 
takes advantage of his situation I 
suiting in a decline in his grades, 
this scheme works with the success s 
pected of it other such plans mpy 
extended to students whose indu 
may not be as high but through th' 
conscientiousness deserve some Cd 
sideration. 

Dr. Livingood also believes that 
is an excellent idea to post the nad 
of those on the "Dean's List in ' 
verse" because Fraternities and - l 
orities do not like seeing their m« 
bers on the list and accordingly « 
will encourage their members to I 
off and stay off the list of uny>! 
factory students. The student ^ 
self is not particularly interested 
having his "shame" published tor 'J 
world to comment upon. 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



TA Card Party, Basketball Game, Head Weekend's Social Calendar 



Ire Hundred, Bridge Featur- 
ed At Card Party; Court 
Game In Armory 



: a ; 



■ card party in Hodson Hall this 
■ning at eight o'clock sponsored by 
j$ Keta Tau Alpha Sorority will 
i the week-end's social calendar 
week. The only other event on 
calendar is the Salisbury-Wash- 
Bton College basketball game which 
11 begin at eight on Saturday night 
ihe local armory. 

he card party, of which presi- 
| Ellen Peters is general chairman, 
p liave tables for Bridge and Five 
idled. The ZTA's are preparing 
at least twenty tables. Two piiz- 
vill be given for boys and two for 
iris. 

efreshments will be served at the 

of the evening;. Tickets will be 

; salc at the door for twenty-Jive 

ell)-. 

pmmittees in charge of the card 

are: Ellen Peters, general 

Jrman; Alice Johanns, refresh- 



Hugh Bradley, 
History - 

As another of its educational fea- 
tures, the ELM presents this book re- 
view by Professor Charles Snyder. 
The book, written by an alumnus of 
the College, was published this year 
by Doubleday, Doran and Company, 
New York, and has been presented to 
the College Library as are all booqs 
reviewed in the ELM. 



'19, Writes New Social 
'Havana : Cinderella's City" 



Doubleday, Doran And Company 
New York, 1941 



lent 



Naomi Russell, tables; Laura 
, prizes, and Pat Frary, chairs. 



The growing emphasis upon social 
history during; the last decade has 
frequently diverted the attention of 
historians from world capitals, legis- 
lative halls, foreign offices, and the 
more formal scenes, to less conspicu- 
ous, albeit, nwre colorful settings. 
Histories of the Delaware, Kennebec 
and Charles rivers, the ports of New 
York, Gloucester and Baltimore, to 
mention only a few, have recently 
been published. Now Havana gets 



Coronation Of A King and Queen 




Fhc preliminaries to the Salisbury- 
Mimston College game will begin 
P:00 P.* M. The main game will 
m at 8:00. 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown. Md. 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



Usilton's jj 

g 

Funeral Home, Inc. 5 

Phone 72 High St. s 

*%s\\s\\\\svs\\\s\\v\\v.; 



CKESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL V^ORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber, Mil! Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone 5. 



] the recognition it so richly deserves 
■ in Hugh Bradley's Havana Cinderel- 
' la's City. 

To the average American, Havana 
may suggest the rumba, rum-run- 
ning, black cigars, revolution, sugar, 
I or the battleship Maine, and to the 
j more casual Caribbean tourist, Morro 
Castle, Tacon theatre, Sloppy Joe'^ 
or the azure waters of Havana's har 
bor. None of these has escaped Mr 
Bradley's keen observation. In fact 
his extended research has provided 
him with an almost incredible mass of 
detail. Yet he never becomes en- 
cyclopedic. Ke has blended sound 
research with a facile imagination and 
has produced an intimate gossipy 
chronicle which maintains a lively 
pace throughout. 

To summarize the book is hardly 
practical. It opens in the year 1492 
when Columbus first gazed in admira- 
tion upon Cuba's forest fringed coast- 
line, "that most beautiful land ever 



CHESTERTOWN 

BANK 

OF 

MARYLAND 



1 


See 


' 


OTIS 


Foi 


Ths HAIRCUT 



PAUL'S 


Shoe Repair 


Shop 



beheld by human eyes." After a 
brief glance at the aborigines, it 
turns to the exploration of the island 
and the founding of Havana. The 
latter came about most inauspiciously 
in 1519, when a few score of colon- 
ists from the southern shore of the is- 
land treked northward in search of 
better lands and fewer mosquitoes. 
Failing in their immediate purpose, 
they discovered instead, a quiet har- 
bor and cooling northeastemly winds. 
Havana was thus already nearing its 
centenary when the first permanent 
English settlement was founded on 
the American seaboard at James- 
town. 

(Continued on Page Six) 



LIGHT. 



POWER 



From 



Chestertown 

Electric LigJit 
and Power Co. 



. Phone 333 



PAINT 



for EVERY need 

"Tinie-Tested Products" 

The Glidden Company 

21 N. Liberty Street 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builders 
Phone 305 - 288 — Campus Ave. 
CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
—For— 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 




Meet Your Class Mates 

— at— 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



Ellen Peters 



Mayor Phillip G. Wilmer, of Clios- 
I tertown, is asking the cooperation of 
1 the students in a practice blackout 

j Thursday night. 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 



A complete line supplies plus all 
For all classes 



texts 




: ..'■■'.."■'.'. .... : :■..::;.. 

How to Win Friends 

in one easy lesson 
Treat yourself and others to 
wholesome, delicious Wrigley's 
Spearmint Gum. Swell to chew. 
Helps keep breath sweet, teeth 
bright. The Flavor Lasts^ 




PACE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1941 



These Men Will Start Against Salisbury State Teacher's Saturday Night At The Armory 




Francis McNiff, guard 



Jim Stevens, forward 



Bill Benjamin, center 



Frank Samele, forward 



Lew Yerkes, guard 



Kardash's 
Comer 



The Sho'men eleven, excluding 



Navy, led state teams in regard to 
possessing the most successful sea- 
son on the gridiron. Lew Yerkes, 
Al Dudderar, and Ray Kiiby reeved 
places on the Associated Press All- 
Maryland teams. Lew Yerkes, sen- 
sational triple-threat star of the Sho'- 
men gridders, was selected unani- 
mously by forty sports writers and 
coaches. Lew was also cited as be- 
ing the most valuable man on the 
team. Al Dudderar, brilliant senior 
center, edged out his rival, Mike Phil- 
lips of Western Maryland, to secure 
the -enter berth. Ray Kirby, by a 
mere five votes, was placed on the 
All-Maryland second team. In our 
opinion, Ray deserves first team hon- 
ors. It should be noted, however, 
that these selections are not the of- 
ficial All-Maryland choices. 

Being a City College graduate my 
self, the invitation extended to tin 
Baltimore City College football tean 
to play the Miami Senior High School 
on Christmas night in Florida for the 
scholastic championship of the Unit- 
ed States, has a definite significance. 
It is interesting to note that the Col- 
legians were selected not only be- 
cause of outstanding football work 
bur because of scholastic standing as 
well. Any team that can play 
through 55 games over a span of six 
years against high school competition 
without defeat is tops. The Colleg- 
ians suffered its lone defeat at the 
hands of Fork Union Military Acad- 
emy, a prep school. To Coach Harry 
Lawrence and assistant coach Otts 
Helm go sincere congratulations. 

"Hankus Pankus" Greenbmg, af- 
ter serving 180 days in the army ser- 
vice, left Fort Castor to resume his 
status as outfielder for the Detroit! 
Tigers. The big slugger received ai 
sum of $55,000 per season before bis j 
induction but if Hank can return to [ 
the baseball war and not the Japanese, 
War, he can enjoy life in full. 

There should be a remark on the 
keen interest and enthusiasm for the 
spectators, who this year, will again 
witness the Washington College court: 
games down at the Armory. The 
spaciousness of the Armory, along 
with the other proper facilities should; 
add a much more favorable atmos-j 
phere than was possible last year in 1 
the Cain Gym. 

Bob Feller, speedballer of the 
Cleveland Indians recently enlisted in 
the United States Army. Feller, 
along with other prominent stars of 
the sports world, has realized his 
country's need for every available! 
man. Throughout the United States,} 
future athletic heroes are either en-l 
listing or being drafted to serve the! 
country in the present crisis. Un-J 
questionably, the brand of competi- 
tion in all sports will decline some- 
what but the remaining figures in 
competition will be doing their best 
to please sports fans. 



Cagemen Will Meet Salisbury In 

Pre-Season Clash At Armory Here 



Cambridge All-Star Quint Is 

Slated To Meet Jay Vee's 

In Preliminary Match 

Coach Fred Dumschott's 1941-42 
rendition of the Maroon and Black 
basketeers, faces Salisbury Teachers 
the season's opener tomorrow 
night, December 13 at the Chester- 
town Armory. In a preliminary 
game, the Sho'men Jay-Vee five will 
face a formidable Cambridge All-Star 
quintet. 

The probable starting line-up for 
the Sho'men varsity will be Frank 
Samele and Jim Stevens, forward; 
Bill Benjamin at center; Captain 
Francis McNiff and Lew Yerkes in the 
guard positions. In reserve are Bob 
Ruff, Frank Gibe, Harry Lore, Jerry 
Voith, Gil Conant, and Val. Lentz. 

No definite lineup, as yet, has been 
set for the Junior Varsity. Most 
likely, a team will be chosen from the 
following: Jim Juliana, Stoney Mc- 
Laughlin, Carl Brutz, Chuck Kline, 
Norman Tarr, Jim Svec, Turner Hast- 
ings, Dick Porter, and Eddy Bosc. 

The Varsity Five should encounter 
little difficulty in dispersing with the 
Salisbury Teachers. The Teachers, 
in fact, were defeated by the Cam- 
bridge All-Stars who will face the 
Sho'men Jay Vee's. Coach Dum- 
schott contemplates starting a fairly 
strong junior team to oppose the All- 
Stars. 

The initial contest will probably 
start at 7 P. M. with the finale com- 
ing at 8:15. 



Yerkes, Dudderar, And Kirby 

Receive All-Maryland Honor 



played inspired ball throughout hi: 
college career climaxing it with 
sterling defensive game against Dela- 
ware. He will be a hard man to re- 
place in the 1942 lineup. 



The Associated Press and College 
coaches of Maryland released their 
194X All-Maryland selections this 
past week. This team, as yet, has 
not been made the official "All-Mary- 
land", as the Baltimore Sun's has 
been in prior years, but there is a 
possibility that it will be made offi- 
cial. 

Washington College is being repre- 
sented on this team by rangy Lew 
Yerkes, who has been the mainstay of 
the Sho'men backfield all year with 
his superb kicking and excellent 
broken field running. He was unin- 
animously selected by all the writers 
and coaches, compiling a total of 40 
out of a possible 40 points. His un- 



animous choice automatically made 
him captain of this mythical eleven, 
which is a great honor for a sopho- 
more to receive. 

Al Dudderar, the ace pivot man of 
the Sho'men for the past four years, 
selected on the first team. He cer- 
tainly deserves this honor for he 
was the other Washington product 



Choose 



Hochschild, Kohn & Co. 

for correct 

Campus and College Wear 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Tydol- - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



HAD AW AY GROCERY 
Meats and Vegetables 

Phone 37 
Cross Street, Chestertown 



WILLIAM'S 
Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



Fulton Grand 
Laundry Co. 

Finer Grade Launderers ■ 
Baltimore, Md. 

■c-M~^«<-c~5~><-M»>♦♦<-o-i~^<«M-o-^e-> 

£ For Anything In 8 

1 "Men's Wear" § 

5 Do Your Christmas 5 

5 > 

* Shopping At g 

I ALBERT L. WHEAT'S | 

I "The Men's Shop" | 

S Chestertown, Md. $ 

* GO 



CORKHILL 
FRANKS 

ARE GOOD 
ANYTIME 

Every Time! 



The First 
National Bank 



D O R F ' S 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 

High Street 



Gill's 

Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

Service 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 



T 
Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

A 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



Pentagon Begins 
With Road Trip 

The Sho'men quint will begin its 
official season next week when it trav- 
els to Philadelphia for a three-day 
trip, starting Tuesday night against 
LaSalle College. On Wednesday, 
they will face Moravian and on 
Thursday night, they wind up their 
visit encumbering Villanova. 

These games should prove the 
strength of the Maroons who are out 
for the Mason-Dixon Conference ; 
title. Villanova just recently defeat-, 
id Loyola College of Baltimore 47-26 
Loyola, a member of the Mason-Dix- 
on loop, again looms as the favorite 
contender for the league title. In 
1939, Villanova, one of the best teams 
in the East, trounced the Sho'men by 
about 20 points. There was no 
game between these schools last year. 
LaSalle, for the ^ast two seasons, 
has plastered decisive victories over 
the locals. The Catholics again will 
play the role of favorite over the 
■Sho'men quintet. 

Meanwhile, Moravian College, 
back in 1938, was defeated by a pow- 
erful Maroon team. Captain "Moose" 
McNilT, who shared a starting guard 
berth that year, will endeavor to lead 
his teammates to another victory ov- 
er the Pennsylvania foe. 

Afterwards, the Sho'men will have 
a rest over the Christmas holidays. 
On January 9, they open the new 
year against a fairly strong Baltimore 
U. team in a home game. 




PAGE FIVE 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 

Paints, Hardware and 

Farm Machinery 

Chestertown Phone 51 




<**<-c-<-$-<><><">A<'<H0- ( >r><-jM^^ 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration" 
Phone 48 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



THE FITCH 
DUSTDOWN CO. 

Janitor Supplies 

Baltimore, Maryland 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



Kent County Savings Bank 
Commercial and Savings 

Accounts 

Member Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 



Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Phone 132W 



JEWELRY 
The Lasting Gift 



MACK'S 

RADIO 

SHOP 
Kent News Building 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Tydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



KENT COUNTY 

FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Phone 173 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eye. examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist • Lenses duplicated 



Dr. W. H. Moyer 

CHIROPRACTOR 
X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 




For those little things 
you are always needing 
in your room and for 
dress — 



Stop in at — 



FOX'S 

5c to $1.00 Store 



Washington College 
Belts and Buckles 

$2.25 up 

FINE WATCHES 

JEWELRY 

SILVER and GIFTS 

Come In Today 

It Is A Pleasure To Serve ■ 

You 

NELSON J. FORNEY, JR. 

Jeweler 
CHESTERTOWN, Md. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



DON'T FORGET CHRISTMAS DANCES 
SEE THE 

JUDY 'n JILL 

FORMALS 

CHRISTMAS GIFT SUGGESTIONS 
HAND BAGS BAREIZON UNDIES 

GLOVES . VANITY FAIR UNDIES 

SCARFS MOJUD HOSIERY 

SWEATERS HANDKERCHIEFS 

AND 

DRESSES, OF COURSE ! 

Because of materials used for Defense stock is limited, so shop early and 
be sure to get the best 

PACA'S 

A SMART SHOP FOR WOMEN 



WHERE TO GO FOR ENTERTAINMENT 
"THE HOUSE OF HITS" 

CHURCHILL 

TWO SHOWS EVERY NIGHT 7 & 9 P. M. MAT. EVERY SAT. 
ALWAYS COMFORTABLE AT THE HOUSE OF HITS 

4 DAYS ONLY 
SAT., MON., TUES., WED., DEC. 13, 15, 16, 17 

WARNING 
You'll Want To Turn Your Face Away . . . But Your 
Eyes Will Be Glued To The Screen In Horrified Fascina- 
tion When You See . . . 



THE STRANGEST STORY THE SCREEN 
HAS EVER TOLD! 




h WALTER BRENHAN • WALTER HUSTON 
ANNE BAXTER- DANA ANDREWS 

~<Mr«f J"*" I »J"~"" ■ **» bindli,.'. Mir, >W„d 
' : £m g "'• "" ' Wo,d 8ond • 0ulnn Wllllomi 



CINUJtT-,OX nctvu 



THURSDAY - FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18 - 19 



All The Great Action Pictures You' ve „ 
Ever Dreamed Of ...Rolled Into One ! 




HOLDEN • TREVOR - FORD 

George Bancroft • Edgar Buchanan 

Slorj by Michael Blanktort urd Ltwli ■elt:e» ■ term pill bi 

Horac* McC-.i. Lcnu Beltztr. Michael Blaokiort 
Directed bj EEDRGE MUlStULL • Produced br SiOUEL SISCItQFF 



COMING 




PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 194, 



NEW3 irv 
BRIEF. . . . 

Juniata Names A-O Team 

Ray Sinclear, Al Dudderar, Lew 
Yerkes, and Frank Gibe were named 
to the Juniata College's All-Opponent 
team this year. Ray Kirby received 
honorable mention. Washington Col- 
lege and" Lebanon Valley, the two 
elevens that handed the Juniata 
eleven their worst defeat of the sea- 
son, each placed four men on the In- 
dian's All-Opponent Team. 



Historians To Give Party 

President Calvert Jones announced 
that the Historical Society would hold 
its annual Christmas Party in Hodson 
Hall on Wednesday evening. Com- 
mittees for the program, decorations 
and refreshments have been appoint- 
ed. The singing of Christmas carols 
and the exchanging of humorous gifts 
will be the main features of the Co- 
lonial Party. 



Captain Of All-Maryland 



Book Review 




Next Assembly 

The entire student body will parti- 
cipate in next week's assembly pro- 
gram, according to Mr. Goodwin. 

The Gluee Club and college orches- 
tra will lead the student body in the 
singing of Christmas music. 



Lew Yerkes 



Yerkes On Sun's AH-Maryland 

It was announced this morning that 
Lew Yerkes has been named to Craig 
Taylor's All-Maryland team. Yerkes 
was named by a unanimous vote to 
the Associated Press team. 



Kappa Alpha 

Province Commander Howard 
Locke, Washington, D. C, made his 
official administrative visit to Beta 
Omega last week-end. During his 
stay he checked over the Chapter's 
books, and made instructive criti- 
cisms to the officers. Brother Locke 
also stayed for the first part of the 
initiation Sunday afternoon at which 
Peter de Palma, James Juliana, John 
Kardash, and Herb Morgan were in- 
ducted. « 



went an apendectomy at the Kent- 
Jueen Anne's General Hospital Mon- 
day morning. Jean's frtends are 
glad to hear that she is recovering 

rapidly. 



Zela Tau Alpha 
Jean Phillips, ZTA affiliate, under 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., DEC. 15 - 16 - 17 • 
Those Big Guns O'Fun 

BUD ABBOTT and LOU COSTELLO 
— in — 

"KEEP 'EM FLYING" 

— with — 
MARTHA RAYE - CAROL BRUCE 
The sensational comedy stars of stage, 
screen and radio in their newest and big- 
gest fun hit. 

THUR. - FRI. - SAT., DEC. 18 - 19 - 20 

BIG DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

Hal Roach's Streamliner 

"TANKS A MILLION" 

WILLIAM TRACY - JIMMY GLEASON 

—Plus— 

BILL ELLIOTT in 

"HANDS ACROSS THE ROCKIES" 

— Also — 
DONALD DUCK CARTOON 

—OUR XMAS TREAT- 
SHIRLEY TEMPLE in "KATHLEEN" 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

Loed S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



(Continued from Page 3) 
Mr. Bradley likens Havana to Cin- 
derella for good cause. During its 
early life it was a neglected outpost 
in Spain's far flung Empire. While 
Mexico and Peru supplied vast quant- 
ities of precious metals (which even 
today stagger imaginations dulled by 
a repetition of incomprehensible 
sums, for the Mother Country, Ha- 
vana produced nothing more valuable 
or spectacular than hides. Such Eng- 
lish sea-dogs as Drake and Grenville 
were inadvertently responsible for 
Havana's evolution from village to 
city. Their depredations upon Span 
ish silver galleons forced her to re. 
sort to the convoy system, and Ha 
vana, possessing a commodious har 
bor and situated on the most feasible 
route connecting the Atlantic with the 
Gulf of Mexico, was chosen as the 
western terminus for the annual sil- 
ver fleet. If it provided nothing 
more glamorous than the supplying 
of foodstuffs for the return voyage 
to Spain and the entertainment of 
sailors, it was nontheless, a substan 
tial economy. In the eighteenth cen- 
tury when Europeans developed an 
insatiable demand for sugar, Cuba 
became the world's largest producer. 
Long neglected, it was emerged 



the Pearl of the Antilles, and Havana 
as Cinderella's City. 

During the second decade of \\, 
nineteenth century the colonial p , 
sessions of the long decadent Spaa, 
ish Empire in the Western Hem* 
phere began to sever their political 
ties, until only Cuba and Porto Rj^ 
emained. For reasons which J| t 
Bradley does not make clear, Cubi 
remained a loyal daughter Hespiii 
the gross inefficiency and red tape (j 
Spanish bureaucracy. Even in lgw 
when an outraged United States cany 
to liberate the Cubans from the Spij 
ish yoke and the atrocities of "Butck 
er" Weyler, the Cubans remaind 
strangely apathetic. It was not tba 
author's intention, however, to 
a definite political history. J 
stresses the everyday life of Havana 
and interprets with a deep undct, 
standing, the hopes and aspirationi 
the successes and failures, of its cof 
mopolitan peoples. It is here thai 
Bradley is at his best. 



Alpha Chi Omega 

Alpha Chi Omega will entertain fo 
patronesses at a tea in the sororietj 
room Sunday afternoon. Mrs, M«J 
will pour. Among the guests will U 
three new patronesses, Mrs. Richan 
Collins, Mrs. Charles Kingsley, am 
Mrs. Franees Perry Metcalfe. 



Tune in the Christmas Spirit 

It's Chesterfield Pleasure Time 

Enjoy the music that everybody likes 

N. B. C. Stations 




rs\err# K^hmtmas 
eperi/6oc/i/...Msis 



your old friend 



lhis time I'm coming to you 
With a timely shopping tip . . . 

Drop in at your tobacco store 
Take a look at the handsome way 
Your Christmas Chesterfields are packed. 

You never saw the like 
Of these swell gifts . . . 
Big ten package cartons 
Cartons holding four tins of 50 
And brand new this year 
Special greeting cartons 
Holding just three packs. 

Lhis year It's Chesterfield 
For more pleasure than 
Anything else you can buy 
For the money. 

Cpjriibi 1H1, Liccwt A Mtwb Touccc Co- 



Milder 

Better -Tasting 

..that's why 



Chesterfield 



College 'Blackout' Completed In 40 Seconds; Mayor Is Pleased 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 



The 




JLMlli 



*••*• 

"V" 

••••* 



W. XLI. No. 13. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1941 



Price Five Cents 



ODK Creates Extra - Curricular Award 
For Leadership; Seeks Approval Of Clubs 



Collegiate Staff 
For Blackouts Is 
Made Permanent 

ludents Turn Off Some 600 
College Lights When First 
Air Warning Sounds 



mil 



a 



Id: 



Governor O 'Conor Sends Special 
Message To ELM On Defense 



In exactly forty seconds after the 
rst whistle at the downtown power 
ant had sounded for the practice 
ackout, Washington College was in 
larkness. The whole town, 
•ording to Mayor Phillip G. Wil- 
r, was in darkness in approximate' 
two minutes. Mayor Wilmer call 
(I Dr. Mead by phone this morning 
pressed his gratitude for the 
tendid cooperation of the school. 
In the forty seconds, it took ap- 
mately twenty-four persons to 
out the some 600 lights on the 
mpus. 

Fraternity Row Firat 

Fraternity row was the first to 
ackout, having completed darken- 
g the five houses in some ten sec- 
After this, all the fraternity 
en went out on their porches and 
lied toward Hodson Hall which was 
last of the college buildings to 
m off its lights. In a few seconds, 
the dining hall lights had been 
d and it was evident that college 
n entire darkness, a big cheer 
up from the students. 
The only complaints the fire-ward- 
is had with the way the college cor- 
iponded were that some of the fel- 
ps up around the men's dorms were 
ioking cigarettes outside while in- 
de the dorms, a few of those who 
dn't wish to cooperate, continually 
lighting flashlights and candles. 

Mayor Wilmer Pleased 

However, Mayor Wilmer, in a mes- 
■ge to the ELM this morning said, 
tte are thoroughly pleased with the 

nderful cooperation of the Col- 

;e." 

The black-out personnel, which 
s selected by Mr. Johns, was as 
lows: Reid Hall, Mrs. Willson; 
Ppa Alpha House, Calvert Jones 
<i Edwin Boyer; Theta Chi House, 
PJd Davis and James Diacumakos; 
'tobda Chi House, Basil Clark and 
jlliam Nagler; East Hall, Mrs. 
Middle Hall, Robert Crane; 
ei t Hall, Omar Jackson; Hodson 
11. Atlee Kepler; Cain Hall, Johns 
fltb, Jr., and Henry Lyon; William 
lith Hall, Mr. Johns and Mr. Brown; 
nting Library, Mr. Coleman and 
• Libbey; Dunning Building, Dr. 
PP, Dr. Buxton, and Dr. Corring- 
n : Heating Plant, the Fireman; and 
e three dwellings, their occupants. 
Mi'. Johns announced that these 
toe people will be responsible for 
py blackout test in the future. 



Executive Department 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Mr. J. Calvert Jones, Jr., editor, 
The Washington Elm, 

Chestertown, Maryland. 

Dear Mr. Jones: 

1 hope you will pardon my brief- 
ness in sending you this message for 
the Washington Elm, but the emerg- 
ency is great, there are many things 
to be done and there is all too little 
time to do them. 

Young men and women of today 
can make a great contribution to de- 
fense efforts in any one of a number 
of ways — either by their actual ser- 
vices in the armed forces, or by 
whole-hearted participation in one or 
more .of the many phases of Civilian 
Defense. 

As Chief Executive of the State, 1 
urge every student to full acceptance 
of the extreme necessities of the mom- 
ent, and ask their complete coopera- 




HERBERT R. O'CONOR 



tion in whatever way they find it pos- 
sible to give it. 

With kindest regards, I am, 
Sincerely yours, 
(Signed) Herbert R. O'Conor, 

Governor. 



Notice 

Since the sports page was printed, 
the ELM has received notice that Al 
Duddeiar, senior center, and Associ- 
ated Press All-Maryland choice was 
also given honorable mention on the 
Little Ail-American eleven along with 
Lew Yerkes. Mt. St. Mary's was the 
only other Maryland team to place a 
man on this team. He was Rogan, 



Retires 



\ 




Students Respond To Call 

A number of College students have 
responded to Mayor Wilmer's call for 
volunteers in Home Defense. They 
have been given jobs as air-raid war- 
dens, fire wardens, blackout wardens, 
etc. The Elm has also received not- 
ice that a few of the students have 
volunteered as ambulance drivers and 
for the home guard. 



Recognition Will Be In Form Of Key To Be Awarded 
Twice Annually At ODK Assembly 



The local circle of the Omicron Delta Kappa Honorary 
Fraternity this week announced that it had adopted a plan to 
reward those students outstanding in extra-curricular activities. 
The award, which will be given twice a year, will be in the form 
of a unique key, the design of which this circle of ODK will 
have the exclusive use. 

The idea, upon which Rufus Johnson, chairman of the com- 
mittee for the key, worked upon was to form a parallel to the 

Varsity Club "W" for athletics and 
the Sigma Sigma Omicron Key for 
scholarship. Under this plan, each 
of the three major divisions of stu- 
dent activities (scholarship, athletics, 
and extra-curricular activities) will 
be recognized individually. 



Villanova Victors 
By 58-22 Score 



Completes Perfect Record On 
Pennsylvania Trip 



Villanova College of Philadelphia 
defeated the Sho'men 58-22 in a 
game in which the locals were entire 
ly outclassed. This gave the Penta- 
gon a perfect record of three losses 
n the Pennsylvania trip which ex- 
tended from Tuesday until last night. 

One casuality of the trip occurred 
in the Moravian College game when 
Bill Benjamin, center, was struck in 
the head in the midst of a mixup 
around the basket. He was not able 
to dress for last night's game because 
of the severe cut he suffered. 

The team will now have a rest un 
til after the Christmas recess when 
they meet a strong Baltimore Univer- 
sity team. The last time the Bees 
cames to the Eastern Shore, they suf- 
fered one of their only defeats of the 
season. 



Washington Players Will Give 

Christmas Plays, Party Tonight 

Frank Mead's Orchestra Will Furnish Music For Dance In 
Gym To Follow Plays 



Coach Tom Kibler retired as presi- 
dent last week of the Mason-Dixon 
Conference of which Washington Col- 
lege is a member. He is succeeded 
by Coach Charlie Havens of Western 
Maryland College. Coach "Dutch" 
Dumschott was named secretary- 
treasurer of the same organization. 



Betty Hill and Lee Lachmar, veter- 
an actresses of the Washington Play- 
ers, will try their hands at directing 
in two one-act plays to be presented 
at 7:30 tonight. After the plays, the 
annual Christmas Party will be held 
in the Gymnasium. 

Betty Hill, directing "Don't Feed 
The Animals," has a cast composed 
of both veterans and newcomers. Vir- 
ginia Cooper will take the part of 
Buttons; Mary Lou Truslow will play 
the part of Dian; Betty Lohmuller 
will take the role of Dorothy; Phyllis 
Peters will take the part of Miss Skin- 
ner; Ellen Peters will play the part 
of Sadie; Laura Rainey will portray 
Pearl; Pat Frary will take the role 
of Marie; Lloyd Davis will take the 
part of Jimmy Walton, and Rudy 
Parks will play Stripps. 

The cast for "The Ghost of Green 
Mansions", directed by Lee Lachmar, 
is composed entirely of Freshmen. 
Bob Horsfield will portray Jimmy 
Blakenslip; Lyle Johnston will take 
the role of Dr. Werner; Anne Boil- 



ing will take the part of Eleanor 
Dawson; Paul Parris will represent 
Dr. Coop; Harold English will play 
the part of Dr. Klein, and Paul 
Llewellyn will portray Dr. Tolles. 

At approximately 9:30, the Christ- 
mas Party will commence in the Gym- 
nasium. Those in charge have plan- 
ned a complete evening — from Santa, 
himself, and a quiz program to danc- 
ing. And all free. If the attempt 
to secure tables is a success, it will be 
possible for groups to sit together 
and enjoy the fun. Master of Cere- 
monies, Jim Criss, announced that a 
quiz program between the Faculty 
and some of the students would be 
one of the feature events of the ev- 
ening. He added, "This should show 
the ignorance of the Professors." The 
student body will also learn just what 
the Faculty does over the holidays. 
Frank Mead and His Orchestra will 
furnish music for dancing. Natural- 
ly the main event of the party will be 
the arrival of Santa Claus and the 
distribution of gifts. 



Has Definite Standards 

Johnson and his committee worked 
for several weeks in conjunction with 
campus presidents, devising the exact- 
ing requirements an applicant must 
pass to become eligible. The result 
has been a division of all extra-cur- 
ricular activities into five groups, pub- 
lications, administration, music, dra- 
ma and forensics, and organizations 
and societies, two of which fields an 
applicant must qualify before being 
eligible. 

Each organization on the campus 
is listed under one of these headings 
and there are specific qualifications 
made for the members of each organ- 
ization. 

No Class Distinctions 

According to Johnson, one of the 
good features of this plan is that it is 
open to anyone, Freshman or Senior, 
man or woman. Heretofore, women 
students had on reward for outstand- 
ing work except in scholarship under 
SSO. 

Another good feature is that it will 
become standard just as the Varsity 
"W". In the future, this handsome 
maltese cross will come to symbolize 
outstanding work and leadership in 
this field. 

Johnson wishes it to be thorough- 
ly understood by the students that 
this key will be subordinate to ODK 
since it will cover bat one field of 
student activities while ODK covers 
all. 

Other Keys Will Be Abandoned 

According to the plans, other or- 
ganizations will be asked to abandon 
their plans of giving keys in order 
that this key will become more out- 
standing. Only Sigma Sigma Omi- 
cron, and the Varsity Club, since they 
represent entirely different fields, will 
not be asked to give up their keys. 

Provision is made in the plan that 
these clubs may reward outstanding 
work by any method (pins, certifi- 
cates, etc.) other than a key. 

It is hoped that campus presidents 
will give their okay to the plan im- 
mediately so that the first keys can 
be awarded at ODK's first tapping as- 
sembly. 



PAGE TWO _^^^^^__________ 

THE WASHINGTON ELM 
OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. , 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 360 wor ds in length. 

Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager • Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1941 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, I941 



ODK Innovates An Award 

The local circle of Omicron Delta Kappa, through much 
research and hard work, has devised one of the finest systems 
possible for the repognition of outstanding work in the field of 
extra-curricular activities. The reward will be in the form of 
a standard key, of which ODK will hold the exclusive right to 
use, and will be awarded twice annually by ODK. 

Through weeks of study and research, committee members 
of ODK have compiled, through the help of the officers of the 
campus organizations, a definite set of standards which a can- 
didate must pass before the key will be awarded to him. All 
extra-curricular activities have been divided into five fields, pub 
lications, dramatics and forensics, administration, societies and 
organizations, and music, and a candidate must qualify in two 
of these fields before he is eligible for the key. 

The purpose of the extra-curricular activities key is to of- 
fer, to the leaders of extra-curricular activities, a parallel to the 
Varsity "W" which is awarded for outstanding work in ath- 
letics and to the Sigma Sigma Omicron Key which is awarded 
for outstanding work in scholarship. Only a few people are 
eligible for the key at present, thus making it significant in its 
limitations. 

In order for the key to become a success, all other organi 
zations, with the exception of Sigma Sigma Omicron and the 
Varsity Club which are in entirely different fields, must give up 
their keys for the same reason that none other than the Varsity 
"W" may be worn on the campus. In this way, a student re- 
turning to the campus several years from hence would recog- 
nize immediately the wearer of one of these keys as outstand- 
ing in extra-curricular activities just the same as he would 
recognize SSO or the "W". 

Many values can be seen in this project that warrant the 
wholehearted support of the entire student body. 

1. It rewards those people who have worked diligently 
and successfully in extra-curricular activities and who have not 
met the requirements of ODK. 

2. It would recognize outstanding women as well as men, 
which ODK does not do. 

3. The standards set are so high as to make it significant, 
though inferior to Omicron Delta Kappa. 

4. It will standardize keys on the campus. 

5. It gives the needed parallel to the awards made for 
athletics and scholarship. 

6. Those who have worked diligently for one club and 
yet do not qualify for the extra-curriculars key may still be re- 
warded by their particular organization in any other form (pin, 
certificate, etc.) other than a key. 

For these reasons and others too numerous to list, ODK's 
project indeed seems a project worthy of the students' support. 







NORTHEAST 
^CORNER 



ttiyi* 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



Well, here it is almost two weeks 
since the United States declared war 
on Japan and the rest and we're still 
here at Washington College. Sm 
prising to some people, no doubt — e: 
pecially Maguire. According to D 
Mead, the way things look now, if 
you haven't already registered, you 
stand a good chance of getting left 
out of the whole thing for almost a 
year or more. 

The practice blackout held last 
night brings the reality of war just a 'Monday evening most 
glad to see that deserves special note, 



bit closer, 
the studei 



We 

are well on 



itary Service Information Bureau 
The requirements and application 
blanks for every branch of the ser- 
vice are being secured and will be Io- 
cated in the ELM office. If you're 
sure you want to enlist, you may 
well get in the branch you want- 
come to the ELM office and see the 
full particulars. 

It was very interesting to me to see 
that in some thirty or forty other 
college papers that carried messages 
from the presidents of the vari 
colleges, everyone said the same 
thing and some in almost identical 
words. The local circle of Omicron 
Delta Kappa has originated one of 
the best ideas to ever hit this campus. 
It deserves the support of every stu- 
dent. See the editorial page for full 
particulars. 

The Christmas dinner that Mother 

Lawrence served in the dining hall 

undoubtedly 

It was one of 



attack 



their toes the best ever y served in the Hall and 



and that they aren't as abnormal as 
some people would have them. The 
college was in total darkness in less 
than two minutes after the first sig- 

I. Not bad, I'd say. 

Some few Washington College men 
registered before the outbreak of 
hostilities and it is quite possible that 
they might be called for service. In 
many of these cases, the fellows 
would rather enlist in some other 
branch of the service. For that rea- 
son, the ELM is establishing a Mil- 



Are You Getting Full Value? 



one can't begin to imagine the work 
for Mrs. Lawrence which is involved 
in such a dinner. She would like to 
thank the student body publicly for 
her present from them but she was too 
overwhelmed for words. We do feel 
that the dinner was a bit unfair to 
the girls in that they had to dress 
formally while some of the fellows 
didn't even have ties on. Teh. Teh, 

With a Merry Christmas and 
Happy New Year, we say, so long and 
thirty 'til the next time. 



Students Are Ready To Fight 

For Country, Survey Shows 



The first shock of war has 
The unprovoked "hit and run" 
followed by Japan's declaration , 
open hostility was immediately answ. 
ered, as might have been expected 
by America's unanimous resolution 
to defend on all fronts and in all pc*. 
sible ways the ideals of liberty and 
democracy for which this nation 
stands. Every American of whatev. 

age or wherever serving will ( 
tribute to that final victory. 

We are now settling down cattnl. 

and grimly to the long task ahead. ;■ 

ill not be brief and it will not b ( 

1.--V- li will be a burden of labor 

ot unmixed with sorrow until that 

blessed day comes when an 

is sought by our defeated enemy sod 

our problems suddenly become t 

of reconstruction under the term 

victorious peace. 

Because the burden is great and 
because the struggle will not be brief, 
we are being cautioned by our lead. 
ers to avoid hysterias, to think clear- 
ly* to give no credence to unsupport- 
ed rumors, to act promptly when call- 
ed upon by those in authority, 
avoid embarrassing our leaders with 
shoutings that we know a better 
to operate than do those in whose 
hands authority has been placed; 
short, to do all our usual daily tasfe 
with a calmness, a determination, and 
an efficiency which will make uf able 
to assume the huge added bun 
brought by the emergency with a cer- 
tainty that both the usual and the 
unusual will be successfully handled, 

This does not mean "busi 
usual" and nothing more. But 
usual is impossible in wartime; but il 
does mean all our ordinary jobs pin 
the great inevitable addition w 
war has placed upon us. 

America is strong enough to do i 
because her citizens individually 
capable of carrying this load. Racine 
an engine does not increase the pull- 
ing power of the car. It is the 
steady, solid application of power, 
not jerky or spasmodic, which earrie 
the heavier load up the longer hill. 

This must be the American « 
and in this every individual in the to 
tal population of America's man: 
millions can daily and hourly conin 
bute. In this then let us all be caln 
determined, efficient, and fin. illy w 
torious. 

—Gilbert W. Mead 



The male students of Washington 
College are ready to fight for their 
country when needed, an inquiring 
ELM reporter learned in his inter- 
views of of draft age. 

All of those interviewed were very 
much in favor of the United States 
entering the war under the condi- 
tions which, they feel, were pressed 
upon us. Some even felt relieved 
that we had finally joined the strug- 
gle as they knew it was a matter of 
time and would happen sooner or lat- 



The seniors feel that they would 



Through various ways, other than official, the ELM has 
learned that certain members of the student body who are in- 
terested in seeing the students receive full value for their money 
spent on extra-curricular activities, believe that the ELM is mak 
ing excess profits at the expense of the students. To clear up 
all these rumors, we print the following facts. 

Last year, each student paid for the ELM, one dollar and a 
half. He received twenty-six four-page papers. 

This year, each student paid for the ELM, one dollar and a 
half. He is receiving thirty issues, fifteen of which will be four 
pages, and fifteen of which will be six or more pages. 

In addition to this increase in the number of issues and | rather complete their education be- 
pages, at no additional cost, the ELM has covered the Washing- fore going into active duty, but if 
ton College field of news more completely pictorally; the ELM j called, they will go, nevertheless. All 
has sponsored a fashion show; the ELM has sponsored an All- 
College Night; the ELM has sponsored a project wherebye each 
book reviewed in it is donated to the library; the ELM is spon- 
soring a Military Service Information Bureau ; and the ELM is 
sponsoring a project to secure safer conditions between the col- 
lege-proper and Bennett's. In the future, the ELM will con- 
tinue to sponsor various projects it believes will be of value to 
the student body and the college as a whole. 

If the students are not receiving the full value from the dol- 
lar and a half they pay to the ELM this year, then, did they re 
ceive their full value in years passed? 



of the Senior boys interviewed felt 
that they should have a diploma, if 
drafted, as they feel it will be neces- 
sary for getting a job after the war 
is over. 

Of the ten men interviewed, only 
three have been deferred because of 
previous military training. Howev- 
er this is a large percentage to have 
the experience necessary for an affi- 
cer in our military forces. 



Two Receive Ratings 

Ray Kirby, who has been previous- 
ly deferred, has just received rating 
of A-l, which makes him subject for 
call at any time. Ray feels that he 
would rather complete his education 
first, but is quite ready to fight for 
his country when the war becomes so 
intense that there is a definite need 
for him. 

"Big Jim" Stevens, previously de- 
ferred, has also just received his A-l 
rating, which makes him subject for 
immediate call. 

Bill Paca, a member of the Marine 
Reserve Corps, was "very much in 
favor of the United States going to 
war under the conditions pressed up- 
on us." 

Bob Crane, who has been previous- 
ly deferred, would like to finish out 
his scholastic year, but he feels will- 
ing to go regardless. He feels that 
a drafted senior is deserving of a di- 
ploma, but does not definitely care 



Goodwin Names 
Chapel Programs 

Dr. Emmanuel Sterheim, of Loi 
iana, a professional lecturer on E" 1 
opean affairs, will be the assemM 
speaker on Thursday, January 8, 
cording to an announcement by *f 
Goodwin. 

Other prominent speakers who;* 
appearance on the assembly pro^rsfl 
has been arranged by Mr. Good* 11 
include Judge Waxter, of Baiting 
Mrs. Murrell, of Florida, who *■ 
speak on "Women, Love, and La* 
and Mrs. Marie Peary Stafford, 
Washington, D. C, who has the & 
tinction of being the most northerlf' 
born white child in the world and 
known as the "Snowbaby." 

Dr. Sternheim has wide experie 
as an educator and lecturer. He ** 
ceived his education at the W". 
Chapel Foundation School and OH 
versity College, London, Oxf or " 
Heidelberg, and the University 
Paris. His academic honors inclo*' 



his own case, unless it is a prerequis- 
ite for graduate school. He is not a Fellowship in the Society Intefl* 
after a diploma, he says, but is in col^tionale Philologie and the Sciences 
lege for "what he can get out of it." Beaux Arts. 



Sport flse 




Kim Section 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1941 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, CHESTERTOWN, MD., 



PAGE THREE 



Kardash 's 
Corner 



Lew Yerkes, three-letterman in 

ootball, basketball and track, gained 

, halfback berth on the Sun's 1941 

,11-Maryland Collegiate Eleven. Lew 

ias the mainstay of the Sho'men of- 

isive attack; he was a triple-threat- 

in every sense of the word. When 

v emerged out of an open hole 

line, he sprinted like a deer; his 

sing was consistent and his punt- 

, especially quick-kicking, was ex- 

rile nt. 

Al Dudderar, brilliant Maroon cen- 
, also received recognition, being 
laced on the All-Maryland Second 
earn. Al, for the last four years 
is been a bulwark of the Sho'men 
:n. This year, he performed on 
nc of the strongest lines in Wash- 
fftOJi College's history and turned in 
tcrling exhibitions. Al, who right- 
iilly deserves First Team honors, has 
1 .'ii sadly neglected by the Sun's 
election for the past two years. 



Pentagon Wins Opener; Loses Next Two 



Bows Before LaSalle And 

Moravian College; Wins 

Over Salisbury Teachers 



Little AU-AmeriCan Mention Washington 56 - Teachers 24 



The Washington College Pentagon 
began it's basketball campaign with 
an unimpressive 56-24 victory over 
very weak Salisbury State Teache 
team, last Saturday night in the local 
armory. After the first five minutes 
of each half, Coach Dumschott sent 
in the second and third teams. 

The official season began on Tues- 
day when the team travelled to Phil- 
adelphia and was defeated 60-33 by 
a strong LaSalle quintet. The fol- 
lowing night the game ended with a 
47-31 victory for Moravian. The 
Washington College team, led by 
Frank Samele, with 14 points to his 
credit, were winning throughout the 
first period. With the start of the 
econd half, Frankie Majczan, of 



Moravian, tied up the score and the 

In Philadelphia for three consecu- d„h,i dK «™ *•„ i w «. *.*.«. 

■ u* j.l e>L i • . , i Dethlenam team led for the rest of the 

ve nights, the Sho men quint should 

vc been thoroughly tested as to its 

tential strength. The Maroon's A " account of Iast ™eWs Villano- 

ced two formidable Eastern quin-! Va eame W1 " be found on the flont 

LaSalle and Villanova's Wild-! page ' 
ts. Moravian College had a fairly j ' °° 

od team. Coach Dumschott still ~~ 
lieves there 



oom for improve- 
nt in the Sho'men attack. Con- 
ntly moving the ball and likewise 
emselves until a shot presents itself 
pifies any good team. The sea- 
n's young and the Sho'men defin- 
ely have the possibilities for a 
*ong team. 

Just before the Green Bay Pack- 
s and Chicago Bear game in Octo- 
a stranger came into a hotel in 
llich several Green Bay players were 
ated around in the lobby. The 
ranger made the remark, "The 
ears can beat the Packers anytime." 
hen the man later came to, he dis- 
vered himself in the hospital. 
Here, he made another statement, 
That's all I wanted to know, now I 
alize the spirit of the team!" He 
mediately placed his money on the 
ickers to defeat the Bears in the 
estern Division Championship. But, 
add to the stranger's troubles, the 
Werful Bears overwhelmed the 
ftting Packers by a 33-14 

earning the right to face the 
lutein Champs, the New York 
ants. 

Howard Pfund, Mike Kardash, 
jse Zebrowski and Howard Neu- 
t, ex-Washington College basket- 
1 stars, are still active in the court 
He. These five boys were mem- 
rs of the 1938 "Flying Pentagon" 
lich lost but three games that year. 
Howard Pfund, Billy Smith and 
we Kardash are cavorting for the 
overland Farms five and are turn- 
? in splendid performances. "Zeke" 
browski, '38 graduate, only a re- 
Bt newcomer to Baltimore basket- 
1! followers, is playing in his sec- 
d season for the strong Bethlehem 
(counting quint. "Goop" will still 
leniembercd for his record smash- 
total of over 1,000 points accum- 
a M -in his four year collegiate 
m Paigns. Howard Neubert, known 
Yank, is playing for Rustless Steel, 
in the employ of this Corpora- 
It is interesting to note that 
fse former teammates are playing 
Posite each other in the sanie lea- 
[e. 

Latest reports in the sports world: 
The racing fans on the Coast will 
11 be able to attend Santa Anita. 
r conditions have caused the post- 
'lement of this event. 



A SPOT # 
• OR TWO 

• • 

OF SPORTS 




Lew Yerkes 



The ELM received notice this 
interning that All-Maryland Lew 
Yerkes had just been given honorable 

mention on the Little Ail-American 



eleven. From records available, it 
appears that Yerkes is the first Wash- 
ington College man ever to receive 
this honor. 



Phil Brown, who coached football 
at Washington College in 1927-'28, 
had an undefeated season at Hose 
Poly, the engineering school at Terre 
Haute, Ind., in the grid campaign ju^t 
complete. His charges rolled up 230 
points (almost a point for each of th* 
265 men in school) to only 34 for 
their seven opponents. Brown was a 
star at Butler University before be- 
ginning his coaching career at Wash' 
ington College. 



The Cambridge Collegians, who op 
posed Washington's junior varsity 
cagers in the preliminary game at the 
score, j Armory last Saturday, are coached by 
Milton "Mickey" Hubbard, a member 
of the Washington varsity in 1918- 
'19. Hubbard, a postal employee at. 
Cambridge, has followed the game 
closely as a player and coach since 
graduation and his charges on Satur- 
day proved themselves a formidable 
foe. 



Tom Kibler, veteran athletic direc- 
tor at Washington College, found 
himself back in a familiar role for a 
couple of days last week. With both 
Fred Dumschott and George Ekaitis 
on 24-hour duty with the local unit 
of State Guard Kibler was once again 
in the spot he held for so many years 
— the complete athletic staff at the 
local school. He held gym classes, 
conducted the intra-mural cage games 
and was ready to take over the varsi- 
ty basketball squad again when" the 
State Guard duty was eut down and 
normal conditions resumed. 



GIRLS' 

SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



On Tuesday night at six-thirty the 
first girls' basketball practice was 
held in the Gym. From the turnout 
for practice the season promises to be 
a good one. As usual the greatest 
number out was Freshmen and if 
they play as well as they showed their 
enthusiasm in practice the champion | 
Juniors had better look to their laur-l 
els. Actual scrimmage and games! 
will not begin however until after 
Christmas. 

With a new sport ushered in it 
seems like grave-digging to mention 
hockey but a vote of congratulation 
should be given the members of the 
team and also the Board of Managers 
for their wise choice in selecting the 
team. It also seems fitting that the 
final standings of the teams should be 
noted: Seniors, Freshmen, Juniors 
and Sophomores. 

Getting back to basketball the 



champion Junior Navy team has all 
of its members returning while the 
other Junior does not. The Sopho- 
more teams are the hardest hit how- 
ever and probably they will be con- 
solidated into one. The Seniors have 
most of the team returning and in ad- 
dition are getting Lois Stevens who 
may prove as valuable to tnem in bas- 
ketball as she was in hockey. From 
the turnout at practice the Freshmen 
will have two full teams. 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Tydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



MACK'S 

RADIO 

SHOP 
Kent News Building 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration" 
Phone 48 



Meet Your Class Mates 

— at— 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
— For— 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



Fulton Grand 
Laundry Co. 

Finer Grade Launderers - 
Baltimore, Md. 



Salisbury T. 


G 


F T 


Ncmcolnb, f 


— 3 


1-2 7 


Fatzer, f 


2 


2-6 6 


Kirbv, t 





1-2 1 


Malone, c 


- 2 


3-4 7 


Day, g 





2-2 2 


Totals 





1-6 1 


7 10-22 21 


Washington 


G 


F T 


Samele, f 


2 


1-2 5 


Stevens, f 


5 


1-1 11 


Voith, f _ 


5 


0-1 10 


Ruff, i . 


_ 2 


0-0 4 


Benjamin, c 


4 


1-1 9 


Conant, c t 





0-0 


Yerkes, g 


4 


0-2 8 


McNiff, g 


1 


0-4 2 




1 


1-1 3 


Tan-, g 


1 




Lentz, g 


---l— 
— 


1-1 1 


3ibe, g 


0-0 


Totals 






25 


6-12 56 


Washington 


32 


24—56 


Salisbury 


11 


13—24 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractor, and Builders 

Lumber, Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone 5 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 

. . . phone 14 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 194, 



NEWS iiv 
BRIEF. . . . 



Walk To Be Lighted 

Mr. Johns announced yesterday 
that a system of lights would be in- 
stalled between the college-proper 
and Bennett's as a protection for the 
students against automobiles and al- 
so to aid the walkers in avoiding mud- 
puddles. 

The ELM began agitating for this 
improvement several weeks ago. 
Originally, the plan was to extend 
the walk past Fraternity Row on up 
through the triangle. It was found 
that this was financially impossible. 
The idea of a temporary walk was im- 
practical, stated Mr. Johns. 

The ELM settled for what it 
thought the next best thing, a system 
of lights. A light will be installed on 
every telephone pole between Ben- 
nett's and the school. By agreement 
Bennett and the College will cooper- 
ate on the improvement. 



She Loves Music 



Alumna At Randolph Field 

Graduating its ninth and last class 
of Aviation Cadets for 1941 on De- 
cember 12, Randolph Field completes 
its second year as pace setter for the 
greatest expansion in Air Corps his- 
tory. 

This class, 254 student pilots, re- 
presents 37 states and Canada; 135 
colleges and universities. Among 
them is one Washington College man. 
He is John H. Farr, '35-'37, Middle 
River, Md. 




Alpha Chi 

The pledges of Alpha Chi Omega 
entertained the active members at a 
Christmas party in Reid Hall Monday 
evening at 9:30. Christmas Carols 
were sung around the fire and re- 
freshments were served in the library. 

Since the sorority has answered the 
call of America an afternoon a week 
has been set aside for knitting sweat- 
ers, scarfs and socks for the soldiers 
and refugees. 



Zeta Tau Alpha 

The Zeta actives and pledges held 
their annual Christmas party Mon- 
day night. The party was planned 
by the pledges. 

Jean Phillips is visiting her sister 
in New York for the Christmas holi- 
days. 



Alpha Chis On Defense 

The Alpha Chi Omega Sorority, in 
recogniding their part in the nation's 
defense, has appointed a defense 
committee with Dian Hubbard as 
chairman. The remainder of the 
year will be dedicated to national de- 
fensive work. 

Working in conjunction with the lo- 
cal Red Cross unit, the girls will be- 
gin their project with knitting while 
through-out the year, they will take 
various first aid courses offered. One 
member, Frances Kreeger, has al- 
ready shown her intentions by sign- 
ing in the Ambulance Corps. 

From time to time, the Defense 
Committee Chairman, Dian Hubbard, 
■will post notices on the bulletin board 
showing how all girls may take a part 
in this most valuable defensive work. 



CHRISTMAS IS FUN! 

Don't let last minute 
shopping get you down. 
Hutzler's still has lots of 
attractive gifts from which 
you can choose. Come in 
and let us help you plan a 

MERRY CHRISTMAS. 

HDTZLER BPQTHERS 6 

Howard, Saratoga and Clay Sts. 



Alpha Omicron Pi 

The actives and pledges of Alpha 
Omicron Pi held a joint Christmas 
party on Monday evening in their 
sorority room. Appropriate gifts and 
verses were exchanged and delicious 
refreshments were served. Alpha 
Omicron Pi wishes to take this oppor- 
tunity to wish everyone a very pleas- 
ant and happy Christmas vacation. 



Hard Work Bringing Success 

To Frank Mead's Orchestra 



Tonight, for the second time on 
this campus, the college students will 
dance to the music of Frank Mead 
and his orchestra. 

For the past few months, this 
group has been preparing itself for 
the spot-lights, which, in the last few 
weeks, it has begun to enjoy. The 
band has already made four public 
appearances and is booked for many 
more in the near future. 

Some of the students have shown 
a great deal of interest in the success 
of the orchestra, and have helped 
with criticisms and suggestions. They 
realize that this success has been 
brought about by nothing less than 
honest-to-goodness sweat on the part 
of all members. You may have notic- 
ed the brass section, made up of 
Herb Morgan, Dick Lynch, Paul 
Ruark, Calvin Lynch, and Don Mc- 
Clellan, annointing their "beat 
chops" with pomade and camphor ice, 



or the reed crew, Ted Hazlett, j a( L 
Hitchcock, Jimmy Crouch, and HncV. 
ey Rothermel, using similar inn,.], 
for fever blisters. The rhythm se c . 
tion also has it's troubles. We heat 
that Chuck Wilson, drummer boy, hi; 
been spending most of his weekly jj. 
lowance on Sloan's Liniment, and that 
Otts Howard, guitor plunker, is won. 
dering when his finger-nails are goitii. 
to outgrow his callouses. 

Heated arguments, almost to t]J 
point of dented instruments, have a], 
so accompanied the boys on their waj 
to recognition; but out of this toil 
trouble, and turmoil has come an o 
chestva which can be danced to, 
among other places, at The Loty 
Gardens, Dover, Del., every Sat unlay 
night (PLUG). Two matters have 
not yet been cleared up though; first, 
what night should be saved for dates 1 
and second, who should sit next to 
the piano. 



Greeks 



Theta Chi 

William Roe recently attended the 
National Interfraternity Conference 
at the Hotel Commodore in New 
York as Beta Eta's delegate. 

Beta Eta Chapter initiated John 
Martin Warther, '43, and Frank Bar- 
ton Evans, '44, last Monday night, to 
Theta Chi Fraternity. 

The house has been completely 
renovated and new furniture is being 
purchased. 



Lambda Chi Alpha 

E. J. C. Fisher, past Grand High 
Alpha of Lambda Chi Alpha Fratern- 
ity and a graduate of Cornell Univer- 
sity was a visitor at the House on 
Monday. 

Epsilon-Theta Chapter of Lambda 
Chi Alpha initiated three new mem- 
bers last week. They are Atlee C. 
Kepler, '42, a member of Sigma Sig- 
ma Omicron and Vice-President of 
the Y. M. C. A.; John C. Harris, '42, 
a member of the Y. M. C. A. and the 
Science Club; Rudolph Parks, '44, a 
member of the College Glee Club. 

Several fellows from the House at- 
tended the wedding of Ogle W, Hess, 
'41, to Miss Mildred B. Brooks in Bal- 
timore on Saturday, December 6, 
1941. 



LOVE POINT 
FERRY 

To and from the 
Heart of BALTIMORE 

LEAVE LOVE POINT 

(B. & E. R. R. PIER) 

Daily ex. Sun. 

1:00 a. m. 

Daily Daily 

9:35 a. m. 6:00 p. m. 

LEAVE BALTIMORE 

(PIER 5, LIGHT STREET) 

Daily Daily 

7:00 a. m. 3:00 p. m. 

Daily ex. Sat. 

9:00 p. m. 

Passengers, Automobiles and 

Trucks Handled on All Trips 

PASSENGERS: 

50c 85c 

One Way Round Trip 

(4-day limit) 

65c 

One Day Excursion 

AUTOS - $2 

Including Driver 
TRUCKS - $3 to $6 

Including Driver 
Shortens The Way Between 
Baltimore & The Eastern Shore 

Baltimore & Eastern R. R. 



>NNX>X*NX*SV«XSXVreVtXWVkVVCV<^\*«S*V»«V«>J«V£ 

NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



CORKHILL 


FRANKS 


ARE GOOD 


ANYTIME 


Every Time! 



MONDAY - TUESDAY, DEC. 22 - 23 
LLOYD NOLAN in "BEHIND THE NEWS" 

WED. - THUR. - FRI., DEC. 24~ 25 - 26 
— The Screen's Xmas Treat — 




fa^/TEMPlE 



SAT., DEC. 27 — TWO BIG HITS 
"PRAIRIE PIONEERS" 
J _PI US _ 

J "THE GET-AWAY" 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

Leed S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 




president Roosevelt Sets Registration Bate For 20-Year-Olds 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 




fill 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 



Vol. XLI. No. 14. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 1942 



Price Five Cents 



800 College Presidents Adopt 1 5-Point Plan 
For Acceleration Of Education In Wartime 

Collegians Will 
Register Here 
On February 16 



Local Board To Name Polls 

Almost 50% Of Men Here 

Are To Register 



Washington College was one 
of the 800 colleges and univer- 
sities represented at a meeting 

Baltimore on January 2, 3. 
and 4 when the place of highei 
education in the program for 
national defense was the chief 
topic. President Gilbert W. 
Mead and Dean Frederick G. 
Livingood represented the Col- 
lege. 

President Mead said today that the 
:hief result of the three-day session 
was an agreement among all that 
mere was a need of accelerating the 
jollege course so that the average age 
of the graduate would be twenty in- 
:l of twenty-one as at the present. 
The means of accomplishing this ac- 
celeration was left up to the indivi- 
!ual institutions, he said, and already 
everal committees of the Washing- 
Son faculty were at work on the prob- 
These committees will prob- 
ably report at the January Faculty 
Meeting which will be held Monday 
night ' 

Mead Is Non -Committal 
President Mead would not commit 
himself to the ELM reporter on any 
ii'oposal for the school here but indi- 
X that in many cases some means 
ontinuing the college course 
ihroughout the summer months would 
kely be adopted. To this end, he 
aid, a proposal was made, by the 
up meeting in Baltimore, that the 
federal government subsidize stu- 
s who ordinarily used the sum- 
months to earn money for their 
School expenses. 

f. Mead said there was no chance 
)f the establishment of a ROTC unit 
(Continued on Page 3) 




YM May Offer 
Barrier To ODK 
Leadership Key 

Johnson Reports Plans For Key 

Progressing Rapidly; Many 

Clubs Give Okay 



Dr. F. G. Livingood 



'39 Graduate Is 
In Pearl Harbor 



Harry Hicks, '39, Saw Action 
In Pearl Harbor Attack 



Harry Hicks, class of '39, recently 
saw action in the attack on Pearl 
Harbor. His father received a letter 
from him after the attack and al- 
though the material was censored the 
letter implied he was all right. Hicks 
is a supply officer on the U. S. Pelias. 
I He received his commission February 
1st as an Ensign and went on active 
duty June 10th. . 

Richardson W. Saylor, class of '35, 
is now serving as an instructor at the 
U. S. Naval Air Station at Jackson- 
ville, Florida. He secured his wings 
and Ensign Commission last August 
5, and finished his preliminary flight 
training at Floyd Bennett Field, Long 
Island. 



The extra-curricular activi 
ties key for leadership, which 
was originated by a special 
committee of ODK, has receiv 
ed the official okay of most of 
the organizations on the Hi 
Rufus Johnson, chairman of 
:;he special ODK Committee 
announced that he was very 
pleased with the progress. 

The only real opposition may come 
from the YMCA which is one of the 
Jew organizations that will have 
give up the key. Although ODK has 
accepted the entrance requirements 
submitted by President Nagler, it has 
been reported that members of the 
"Y" may prefer to keep their own key 
rather than be eligible for the new 
key. 

At a meeting of the special com- 
mittee on Wednesday night, Johnson 
said that much work has been done 
on the new system and it is nearing 
completion. 

The plan is to get 100 per cent ap- 
proval of the plan from the campus 
organizations so that the first awards 
may be given at the first ODK assem- 
bly. 



Final Call 



The final call for Freshmen to join 
the ELM staff will be made Monday. 
At that time, the office in the Bunt- 
ing Library will be open from 12:45 
'til 2:15 to receive applications of all 
who are interested. 

You must join now to become elig- 
ible for editorship in your Senior 
year. 



Attends Meeting 




CikME&r W. M£*D it.B, 



Players Will Be 
In Assembly Act 

Lloyd Davis And Rudy Parks 
Will Take Lead Parts 



The Washington Players will pre- 
sent "The Devil And Daniel Web- 
ster" in a somewhat different assem- 
bly program Thursday. The play 
was originally written as a short story 
and is now being made into a motion 
picture starring Walter Houston. 

The Players' interpretation will in- 
clude in the cast Virginia Cooper as 
Mary Stone; Rudy Parks as Jabez 
Stone; Frances Mead as Mr. Scratch, 
the Devil; Lloyd Davis as Daniel Web- 
ster and Mort Garrison as the Fid- 
dler. Other members of the Club 
will fill the numerous minor roles. 

The theme is one used in a great 
many plays and stories. It is a tale 
of a man who sells his soul to the 
Devil and when it comes time to pay 
the penalty, he repents. 



Need For Accelerating Coarse 

To Bring Senior Age To 20 

Agreed Upon By All 



'President Roosevelt on Mon- 
day set February 16 for the 
registration of all male citizens 
of the nation between the ages 
of 20 and 44 who have not reg- 
istered previously. This will af- 
fect a few less than 50 per cent 
of the Washington College 
men. 

Men in this group will be subject 
to military service. The date was 
fixed in a proclamation issued Mon- 
day. 

To Insure Victory 

In his proclamation, the President 
noted that this and other registra- 
tions under the Selective Service Act 
"will be required to insure victory, 
final and complete, over the enemies 
of the United States," 

The registration will apply to all 
male students who are citizens born 
on or before December 31, 1921. The 
exact number of Washington College 
students coming under this registra- 
tion has not yet been determined. 
Special Provisions Made 

Provisions were made for registra- 
tion before February 16 and after 
that date in exceptional eases through 
arrangements with Selective Service 
officials. 

The President, for the sake of full 
cooperation with the Selective Ser- 
vice program, urged all employes, 
schools, and government agencies to 
give workers sufficient time off to 
register. 

Officials estimated that approxi- 
mately 9,000,000 men would be en- 
rolled at the registration. 

New Questionaire Slated 

Later will come 'enrollment of men 
between 18 and 20 and 44 and 64. 
Many of the men in these groups, 
Congressional leaders said, could be 
trained for jobs as fire wardens, air- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Highlights Of 1941 As Chronicaled In The Pages Of The Elm 



Issue of January 11 

The State Department of Educa- 
on approved a new course of Lib- 
rary Administration. 
The college orchestra, under the 
■Hdcnt direction of James Spielman, 
P eld its first concert in the assembly. 
The cagers opened their season 
frith three straight losses from West 
Chester, LaSalle and Seton Hall. 



Issue of January 18 
"Maryland During the American 
Revolution," by Dr. Esther M. Dole 
as released by Waverly Press of 

Cagers lost to Mounts 44-42 after 
'ying score eight tiroes. 

Randolph-Macon College added to 
Mason-Dixon Conference. 

ambda Chi's defeated the KA's 
20-14 in Intra-Mural Basketball. 

Mid-Year examinations began on 
Saturday. 



Issue of February 8 
The local circle of ODK 
Judge Stephen R. Collins, Col 
S. Brown, and Rufus Johnson. 

Warner-Haines Orchestra played 
for the annual Junior Prom. 



tapped 
Hiram 



Issue of February 15 
Thirty men were pledged to fratern- 
ities after silence period of 29 hours. 

Bob Ruff was elected president of 
the Freshman Class. Herb Morgan 
was elected as Student Council Re- 
presentative from that class. 

Thirteen students taken in by Sig- 
ma Sigma Omtcron. 

Cagers defeated Delaware 50-35. 



Issue of February 22 

Walter Trent spoke to assembly 
during special program on Washing- 
ton's Birthday, 

William Nagler was elected presi- 
dent of the YMCA. 



Issue of March 15 

Lew Startt plays for Pan-Hell 
dance. Patriotic setting is used. 

Dave Bartolini and Basil Clark 
elected to head respective frats. 

Athletic department issues call for 
spring sports. 

Issue of March 22 

Floyd Mills plays for the Interfra- 
ternity Ball. 

Minor Steele and Ellen Peters 
elected presidents of their respective 
sororities. . 

Players present "Ghost Train." 



Is 



f April 12 
(April Fool Issue) 
Board of Visitors and Governors 
purchases the University of Delaware 
for $14.45 and a pint of bourbon. 

Editor asks for beer in all water 
fountains. 



Issue of April 19 

Calvert Jones and Don Smith nam- 
ed as editors of the ELM and Pega- 
sus. Jones also named president of 
Historical Society. 

Dr. Samuel T. Arnold named Com- 
mencement speaker. 

Phyllis Peters made president of 
the YWCA. 

Sho'men win first two baseball 
games. 



Issue of April 26 

Coach J. Thomas Kibler retires as 
basketball coach. Dumschott named 
to succeed him. 

Sho'man nine wins six straight 
games. 

The annual convention of the 
Maryland Biology Teachers held on 
Campus. 



Issue of May 3 

Crane, Kirby, and Lore nominated 



to presidency of Council. Bartolini 
and Kirby nominated for president of 
AA. 

ELM receives First Class Honor 
Rating from ACP. 

Sara Blackwood named president 
of Cercle Francais. 



Issue of May 10 

Kirby and Lore tie up for president 
of Student Council. Bartolini, John- 
son, and Davis win elections as pres- 
ident of AA, Business Manager of 
ELM and Business Manager of Pega- 
sus respectively. 

Dr. Livingood receives honorary de- 
gree from Albright. 

Austin Murphy re-elected president 
of Junior Class. 

Maguire, Souder, Garrison, and 
Diacumakos named presidents of the 
Players, Debate Club, Orchestra, and 
SSO respectively. 

(Continued on Page 6) 



PAGE TWO 

THE WASHINGTON ELM 
OP WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 
Established 1782 
Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
- and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 

Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager . . .' Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 194 , 



Member 

Associated Cblle&ide Press 

Distributor of 

Golleftiate Di6est 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Collcet Publiibm Riprritntaihe 
420 M&DI60N Ave. New York. N.Y 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 1942 



We Resolve . . . 

In this new year of 1942 at a time when our country needs 
us, let us make- these resolutions in all seriousness: 

1. We will center our attention on the task-at-hand and 
seek new ways of helping. 

2. We will not feel that the whole burden rests upon us. 
We will just do something, however small, and the net result 
will be great. 

3. Worrying about the situation dissipates our energy, 
leads to more worry, and saps our efficiency for necessary work. 

4. We will not expect too much. We will be prepared 
for bad news. It isn't the pain, but the SURPRISE coming of 
the pain that hurts. We will remember that the anticipation 
of danger has a protective effect. 

5. We will question all rumors. We will not let them ef- 
fect us emotionally. 

6. We will trust those in authority. They are the only 
ones in a position to know the facts. 

7. We will not worry near children. They are easily ex- 
citable and spread anxiety quickly. 

Let these be among the things we say this year when we 
raise our hands and say, "We Resolve . . ." 



Yoa Name It 

Have you ever considered having a mascot for Washing- 
ton College? We of the ELM have. For many years now 
our teams have been meeting in competition schools which pos- 
sess mascots, but never yet have we been able to match them in 
that respect. During this past fall, much lamentation over the 
lack of school spirit was voiced. Perhaps this is the solution. 

Nevertheless, the ELM is sponsoring a poll to select a mas- 
cot for the College. In a few weeks, nominations for a mascot 
may be made by any of the student body. 

The mascot, whatever it may be, will probably be under 
the care of the athletic department. It should and will be re 
garded a privilege to care for Our .College's Mascot. Indeed 
it is quite possible that our school may be known for its mascot, 
as in the case of the Army mule, Navy goat, and Fordham ram 
Who knows what might come of the Washington Watchdog? 




NORTHEAST 
=CORNER 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



A Word To The Wise 

Recently, the Women's Student Council passed a rule in- 
flicting a penalty upon those residents of Reid Hall who cut 
campus. This was done to preserve the campus during freez- 
ing and damp weather. The rule has accomplished its pur- 
pose. 

It seems unnecessary for the Men's Student Council to 
make such a rule. Men can realize the effect that cutting cam- 
pus will have during this freezing and thawing weather. A 
word to the wise is sufficient. 



Where 
Were You? 



One of the young things over Reid 
Hall way who wears specs in the 
privacy of her room says that she 
may be quoted as saying she looks i Doc hi 
just as intriguing with them as she i the am 
does without them. Her initials are i go t the 

Laura Rainey . . . The "Terrific j how, he forgot the Coach. "Dutch" 
Three," Pat, Dick, and Pete gave the j finally had to call Coach Kibler to get 



night. Seems as though there was 
something about a tin hat, a bugle, 
and a left jab. 

A lonely bunch of gala it will be in 
Reid Hall when all the heart-breakers 
who have signed up begin to leave. 
Among them are Jerry Sobl, Jim 
Stevens, Al Dudderar. Basil Clark, 
and Stoney McLaughlin . . . Then 
there's the one about "Doc" Parris, 
the man with the 2.15 index. Seems 
though "Dutch" Dumschott gave 
car to take all the cagers to 
iory for practice. Well, Doc 
n all to the armory but some- 



boys quite a floor show the other ' 



(Continued on Page 6) 



About a week ago, during the 
Christmas recess, we were so favor- 
ably impressed with Salisbury and 
the people we met there, we wrote 
our entire column about that place. 
In it we mentioned one Eiko Oshima 
and Frances Johnson, two Goucher 
students we met over there and such 
things as the Salisbury penthouse 
jail, progressive dinners, and coon 
hunts. However, since we have come 
back to the old Alma Mater, more im- 
portant news has come to the front 
and we have to let all th.aj.rest until 
another time in the near'future. 

Since Monday when President 
Roosevelt issued bis proclamation 
setting the date for the rtgistration 
of 20-year-olds, it seems that each 
of the registrants feels that he is 
the most important person in the 
country. Each of them is very 
confident that he will be called to- 
morrow and that he will be sent 
immediately to the most important 
front. Of course, we suppose that 
it is just human nature to feel that 
way and we aren't denying that we 
have had similar feelings. However, 
according to Brigadier General 
Hershey, the big shot of the Select- 
ve Service, there isn't much need 
>f the students of today worrying 
about being stopped sometime in the 
middle of this year. 

Another big item of student inter- 
est that occurred just toward the end 
of the vacation was the meeting of 
representatives from some 800 col- 
leges throughout the United States to 
adopt a wartime program for Amer- 
ican colleges. President Mead repre- 
sented Washington College in this 
meeting which was held in Baltimore. 
The purpose of the meeting was to de- 
vise some method whereby the aver- 
age age of the college graduate will be 
twenty rather than twenty-one. V: 
ious plans call for summer sessio: 
the abandonment of inter-collegiate 
athletic contests, the intensifying of 
physical education, and the dropping 
of extra-curricular activities to i 
minimum. 

The Faculty and Administration 
of Washington College will hold a 
meeting Monday night to discuss 
these plans. No definite meeting 
date has been scheduled for the 
Board but it is thought that they 



will hold a meeting sometime in the 
near future. Still on the war but 
back to the home front we noticed, 
the other day while browsing 
through the stacks, a book called 
"Maryland During The World 
War." We just happened to open 
to the record of Coach Tom Kibler. 
At the end of one of the longest 
records in the book, comes this ci- 
tation for the Distinguished Ser- 
vice Cross: 
"Although severely gassed by a gas 
shell which burst in the trench beside 
him Lieutenant Kibler retained com- 
mand of his company and led it for- 
ward in a difficult night attack, pene- 
trating the enemy's line to a depth of 
2 kilometers. Throughout the night, 
he and his men were subjected to t 
deadly cross fire from enemy ma- 
chine guns and at daybreak a strong 
counter attack was launched against 
him. Heroically leading a small force 
against the flank of the attacking par- 
ty, Lieutenant Kibler succeeded ir 
routing a greatly superior force. He 
courageously continued to lead his 
men until so weakened by the effects 
of the gas that he lost consciousness." 
No further words are needed. 

The ELM enters another venture 

this week as it promotes a program 

for the selection of a mascot for 

Washington College. Members of 

the Administration, Faculty, and 

Student Body have often expressed 

the desire for such a mascot. Let's 

hope that everyone will cooperate 

in this poll and help us select a 

mascot that will continue to live as 

the Navy goat and the Army mule. 

In the language of another world, 

we say "poi oh poi, we are so tired we 

could go for a good shoulder massage. 

The sooner the better." So long, 

and thirty. 



Let This Be Your . . . 

No. 1 Resolution 

(or 1942 

Help Defeat the 
Aggressor:, by put- 
ting your savings — 
regularly — in U. S. 
Defense Bonds and 
Stamps. 

<._ 
Get Your Share of — 

U.S. Defense BONDS -STAMPS 




Meeting in Baltimore on January 
2, 3, and 4 for the last three days of 
the holiday period, was one of h^ 
largest groups of representatives of 
higher education ever, probably, 
sit together at any one time. It 
a war-time emergency meeting, and 
was joined in its conferences by 
prcsentatives of the Army Genera] 
Staff", the Navy Department, the Se. 
lective Service, the Federal Security 
Administration, the national office ol 
Education, and leaders from manj 
other branches of the government. 
The whole problem was to consider 
the place and duty of the colleges in 
the present situation. 

From the discussions arising in tKi 
meeting, several concrete matten 
evolved which are of practical 
est to college men everywhere. 

It was authoritatively announc&j 
that there will be no extension of mil. 
itary work already existing in col 
leges. There will be no more R. 0, 
T. C. Units established, and 
largement of the ones which 

Enrollment in the basic R. 0. T. 
C. courses does not provide draft ex 
emption. There will be no summit 
Officers Training Camps. 

Brigadier General Hershey spoict 
very vigorously against permittiof 
voluntary enlistments. He expreitej 
himself strongly in favor of youn| 
men going ahead with the prcienl 
duties until called by the regular op- 
eration of Selective Service. 

It was the unanimous action of thl 
representatives of more than 800 col 
leges and universities that degree) 
should not be granted to men whl 
enter the service before graduation, 
except after the completion of mili- 
tary service and then only on meet 
ing whatever standards of award tin 
colleges individually might set, 

In the light of the new 20-year-o" 
active service age, it was urged thai 
colleges make provision for thi 
cent rat ion and acceleration of Ibl 
college course so as to graduate lis! 
student at the average age of 20 id 
stead of the present average of 21; 
this acceleration to be accomplish 
without lowering the stand 
work to be covered. The preiMl 
standards for college entrance are (■ 
be maintained. 

A unanimous action was taken R 
questing the Selective Service autl 
orities to change their regulations 
as to permit the deferment of legiti 
mate pre-medical, pre-dental, and prt 
theological students who have finisl 
ed the work of their Sophomore y<# 
Final action on this matter has nl 
been taken as yet by Selective Sfl 
vice officials. 

In anticipation of the forthcoroia 
February 16th registration of "^ 
tional men, including the 20-year-o' 
class, General Hershey comment' 
again on the fact that there is »t' 1 ' 
reservoir of approximately 1,000,00 
men already classified 1-A from 
previous registration who have 
yet been called, and who are clip" 
for call before any of the new ref" 
trantf. His point was strengthen' 
later by his radio address on Mon Jt ' 
in which he said, "Students will e* 
tinue their studies when by so d°° 
they become trained for profe*"* 1 
in which there is a scarcity. 

Gen. Hershey also pointed out* 
approximately 17,000,000 men 
already registered, and an adding 
25,000,000 will soon do 
this great resource of man-pow 
government can best select by its j 
methods the men needed at any j 
ticular time. 

A very practical point, insbte* 
on by both the college men 
government representatives was 

(Continued on Page 6) 



r 






.4 



FRIDAY, 



JANUARY 9, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



Independent Players Group Will Present Operetta 

Itped To Produce "Pickles* 
fit College By Spring 



ipjcldes", otherwise known as "In 

[Vienna", is the name of the oper- 

( chosen by a group of College 
HiJeiits to be given this spring un- 

the direction of Mrs. Iola Booker, 
td music teacher and chorister. 

This operetta was chosen from 
ur by a committee consisting of 
u Booker, Mildred Powers, Sara 
Ljcber, Henry Maguire, Rudy 
i: te, and Edward Palder. It will 

given between the latter part of 
pr il and the early part of May. 

it the last meeting, a financial 
jnimittee in charge of advertising 
D i publishing, was appointed by 
jlder, who is chairman of the group: 
Ly Maguire, chairman, Peggy Gil- 
iid, Frances Goodwin, Joan John- 
orii Bob Pierce, and Norman Shar- 
| The stage crew consists of Ed- 
s rd Palder, manager, William Slem- 
e r, Hairy Berry, Charles Willson, 
5 Sara Blackwood- 
The idea of presenting an oper- 
Ha was conceived by Mildred Pow- 
^ Mint Garrison, and Edward Pal- 
t, who asked for the advice of Mrs. 
joker before going on with th*: 
heme. After obtaining her aid, 
1E y posted a notice of a meeting at 
hich a comparatively large group 
a$ present. 

The staff of the operetta is divided 
to two sections: the cast, and the 
eduction staff, which includes those 
king care of setting, properties, 
jaracterization, directing, and bus- 
es arrangements. The officers 
bosen at the first meeting were : Mrs. 
floker, music director; Mort Garri- 
ji, in charge of orchestration; Hen- 
f Maguire, business manager; Ed- 
ard Palder, chairman and stage man- 
ner; Sara Blackwood, in charge of 
ike-up and secretary; Molly Black- 
mod, in charge of properties. 
Those who were present at the 
setting were: Molly Blackwood, Sara 
kkwood, Molly Burrell, Peggy 
Aland, Frances Goodwin, Hilda 
totchkiss, Ruth Johnson, Joan John- 
Mi, Lucilla Latham, Marie Merri- 
en, Mimi Ocker, Maria Petry, Mil- 
red Powers, .Sara Speicher, Lois 
Wens, Emma Jo Stubblefield, Mary 
oo Truslow, Lee Ward, Norma Jean 
f ood, Harry Berry, Mort Garrison, 
Use Kepler, Henry Maguire, Alex 
taimiek, Edward Palder, Rudy 
arks, Wilbert Patterson, Bob Peirce, 
Inry Pote, Norman Sharrer, Wil- 
«d Slemmer, John Smith, and 
tales Willson. 

Tryouts for the cast will be held 
Wweek by Mrs. Booker in the aud- 
•nnm. There are several male and 
!n] ale leads in addition to a large 
iorus. 



Among the sources of those in- 
ferable calamities which from age 
a ge have overwhelmed mankind, 
'J - be reckoned as one of the prin- 
? a li the abuse of words. — George 
Rue. 




{*• Gibbons Young, '40, and Miss 
0ls Williams, of Elkton, announced 
,e »' engagement during the Chri.st- 
115 holidays. 



Jfe and Mrs. J, S. Kreeger an- 
° u need the engagement of their dau- 
^ Frances Elizabeth, '42, to 
^rles Edward Fetter, Ml, last week. 

Margaret Anne Brice, ex-'42, was 
apr ied to Ensign Brewster Phillips 
1 toe Protestant Episcopal Church of 
**Port, Long Island, on January 3. 

c e oupIe will make their home in 
f*port, 



This Scene May Be A Float In Tercentenary 




Registration . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
raid spotters, and emergency police- 
men. 

A new questionaire has been pre- 
pared to aid the local boards in de- 
termining the qualifications of the 
registrants. 



Meeting . . . 



This mural which is found in the Bunting Library may be reproduced on a 
float by the Washington College Historical Society for the Kent County Ter- 
centenary celebration. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
on the campus since it was flatly in- 
dicated that there would be no ex- 
tension of military work in colleges. 
Hershey Against Enlistments 

He said that General Hershey, di- 
rector of the Selective Service pro- 
gram, urged against voluntary enlist- 
ment for college men and requested 
them to stay in school until called to 
duty through draft channels. 

One way in which the College 
could be a definite help, he said, was 
to better equip the college men phy- 
sically for the rigors of military ser- 
vice and to this end, he indicated, 
Washington College's physical educa- 
tion program likely would be enlarg- 
ed. 



With The- 



Greeks 



Alpha Chi 

Alpha Chis are giving a card party 
for the benefit of the shell shocked 
children of Great Britain on Friday, 
January 16th in Hodson Hall. Care 
for the shell shocked children of 
Great Britain is the national project 
of this sorority. All money over our 
quota will go to the American Red 
Cross. 



CROSSING THE BAR 




Zeta Tau Alpha 

The members of Zeta Tau Alpha 
will raffle off a cake for the benefit of 
the American Red Cross next week. 
Chances are on sale now. 

The active members of Zeta will be 
hostesses to the pledges at a luncheon 
in the Reid Hall Library next Tues- 
day at noon. 



IB** jT$f£ £5 sS* |P# 




Lambda Chi Alpha 
The active members and Alumnae 
of Epsilon-Theta Chapter held a ban- 
quet at the "Deutches Haus" in Bal- 
timore on January 3, 1942. There 
were approximately forty present at 
the banquet. 



Kappa Alpha 

A number of the brothers are 
planning to enter the naval service, 
either as aviators or as deck and en- 
gineering officers, according to the 
new plan brought forth by the navy 
recently. 

Omar Jackson has passed both his 
preliminary and final physical exam- 
inations, and he is entitled to a com- 
mission as ensign in the Naval Re- 
serves upon completion of his train- 
ing course after graduation. Jack- 
son is training for a deck and engin- 
eering officer. Ray Kirby has taken 
a preliminary examination in prepar- 
ation for the same position. 



ONE OF RADIO'S best bets is the ensemble singing of 
Fred Waring's Glee Club, feature of Chesterfield's "Pleasure 
Time". broadcasts five nights weekly over N. B. C. stations. 
Waring, who originated the organ-like technique used uni- 
versally with glee clubs, professional and scholastic, spends 
hours in the arrangement of each ensemble number. The whole 
band is drilled to perfection in these vocal get-togethers. 



Al Dudderar has passed his pre- 
liminary physical examination for the 
Naval Air Corps. Walt Brandt, who 
also took the preliminary examina- 
tion, was rejected on account of col- 
or-blindness. 

During the holidays, Doc Parris 
and Pat Patterson visited friends of 
Doc's at Conway, South Carolina. On 
a deer hunt at that place the boys, 
along with seven others, bagged three 
deer, averaging 150 pounds apiece. 



Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Mead, jr., 
were the proud parents of a baby 
daughter born on December 20. She 
will be christened Susan Clark Mead. 



He sent his word, and healed them, 
and delivered them from their de- 
struction. — Psalms 107:20. 



A. S. TURNER & SONS 

The Firestone Store 

—SPORTING GOODS— 

Tennis Racquets, Tennis Balls, Footballs, Basketballs, 

Flashlight Batteries, Electric Light Bulbs 

FILL UP WITH GOOD GULF GASOLINE HERE 

High Street 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 

Paints, Hardware and 

Farm Machinery 

Chestertown Phone 51 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



Kent County Savings Bank 

Commercial and Savings 

Accounts 

Member Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 



Dr. W. H. Mayer 

CHIROPRACTOR 
X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builders 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campus Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



FOR THE ^CSt IN 

Laundry Cleaning 

Pressing 

see 

JIM JULIANA 

Representing 

Park Cleaners 



Sport The 




Elm Section 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM CHESTERTOWN, MD., 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 1942 



Kardash's Sho'men Are Underdogs In Clas h With Bees Here 



Corner 



Bees Will Offer Best Compe- 
tition Of Year; Sho'men 



Announces Engagement 






Ready 



And Maryland Later 



What the 1 outlook for the sports j 
world will be for the 1942 year is the 

main problem facing all competitors Ly.jj Mee( DeIaware At New- 
in athletics. It is certain that many | ark Tomorrow; Hopkins 

of the future diamond aspirants are 
going to be drafted or will take steps 
toward enlistment, thus nipping 
many promising futures in the bud. 
Already, veteran major league stars 
are being introduced into military 
service. Naturally, college athletes 
within registration requirements face 
the same situation. But this does 
not mean sports will cease to draw 
big gate?, because baseball and foot- 
ball instills more confidence in the 
minds of American youth to face 
more defiantly the crucial conditions 
of today. 



Quint Has Good Players 

From here on in, the Sho'man 
quint definitely begins its quest for 
the Mason-Dixon title. After a dis- 
astrous 3-day trip in the Philly area, 
whereby the Maroons suffered decis- 
ive losses at the hands of LaSalle, 
Moravian, and, Villanova, respective- 
ly, it was seen that team spirit and 



The Sho'man quint faces one of its 
most strenuous weeks of its sche- 
dule this week, the week following a 
two-weeks lay-off. It begins tonight 
when Baltimore U. is met on the 
home court followed by an encounter 
with Delaware at Newark tomorrow 
night. Tuesday night, the Sho'men 
will meet the Blue Jays at Homewood 
and will climax their week against the 
Terps at College Park. 

Of qthese, Baltimore U. will prob- 
ably offer the stiffest competition. The 
Bees have one of the big teams in the 
c-'intry, having defeated Villanova 
wl.ich defeated the Sho'men by .a 
grand margin. 

Grudge Against Delaware 

The meet with Delaware tomorrow 
night will be a grudge battle as usual. 
The quint has not yet forgotten the 
defeat they suffered at Newark last 
year although they retalliated in the 




A. A. Inaugurates 
Plans For Boxing 

Classes Will Be Under Personal 
Direction Of Ekaitis 



teamwork were lacking and both these: home mutch. Little is known of the 



factors are essential in producing a 
winning club. 

It's not a question of lacking ma- 
terial, not in the least, for the Sho'- 
men possess one of the best cagers in 
the State in "Moose" McNiff. Moose 
is a ball-handler deluxe, a good shot, 
and a polished floorman. He can 
pass sensationally and his ability to 
change his pace while dribbling makes 
him an outstanding cog in the Sho'- 
man play. 

Forwards Are Good 

In Prank Samele, one of the lead- 
ing scorers of the State last year and 
also a member of the All-Maryland 
second team, and Jim Stevens, the 
fastest man around these parts, 
Washington College has two offen- 
sive threats. 



Blue Hen's strength but the Sho'men 
should rule favorites in pre-game 
betting. 

Johns Hopkins, always an interest- 
ing battle, will be the second league 
game of the season, Delaware being 
the first. Bud Tannenbaum, high 
scorer for the Jays, will lead the of- 
fensive against the Maroons. 

Dumschott To Break Terp Jinx 

A week from tonight, the Pentagon 
will again attempt to break the Terp 
jinx on Washington College. For 
five years in succession, Washington 
College has not won a single basket- 
ball or baseball game from Maryland. 
Last year, when the Terp quint had 
lost its first 21 games straight, their 
first victory came when they played 
the Sho'men. 

According to Coach "Dutch" Dum 



Lew Yerkes, with h'is speed and schott, his boys will end the jinx and 



stamina, and Bill Benjamin's excel- 
lent rebound work round out a team 
packed with possibilities. In re- 
serve, Jerry Voith, Bob Ruff, Norm 
Tarr, Val Lentz, Gil Connant, Frank 
Gibe, Jim Julianna, Harry Lore and| 
Carl Brutz all have a part in the 
team's success. 

Ex-Sho'men In The Service 

What are the ex-Washington Col- 
lege stars doing in the military ser- 
vice? Andy Anderson, Jim Steele, 
John Stack, George Pinto, Marlin 
Storm, Leon Horowitz, Joe McLain, 
Ed McMahon, Addis Copple, Bill Col- 
lins, Ed Buck, Bill Buckingham, Jim 
Bush, Charlie Geissler, and Charley 
Smith are all in some branch of mil- 
itary service ranging from buck pri- 
vates to air corps pilots. 

J. Addis Copple, now stationed at 
Aberdeen in an Officer's Training Di- 
vision, would have been given a thor- 
ough try-out with the Pittsburg Pir- 
ates this year. Too bad, Cop, for 
your chances to stick in the big time 
this year were pointing in one direc- 
tion. 



bring home the bacon. 



GIRLS' 

SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



Charlie Fetter 

Charley Fetter, '41, one of the few 
three-lettermen of Washington Col- 
lege, announced his engagement to 
Miss Franny Kreeger, '42, during the 
Christmas holidays. 



A spot m 

m OR TWO 

• • © 

OF SPORTS 



Athletic Director Tom Kibler and 
Fred "Dutch" Dumschott, basketbail 
coach, at Washington College did 
little "postman's holiday" celebrating 
over the Christmas recess. They saw 
several cage games including a dou- 
ble-header in Philadelphia in which 
Rice topped LaSalle and Temple tri- 
umphed over Southern California 
They rate the Rice five as one of the 
best seen in action in a long time. 



Joins Air Force 



Coach Ekaitis announced this week 
that there would be special boxing 
classes to be held in the gym every- 
day of the week between the hours of 
!:45 and 5:30 under his direct super- 
vision. 

All male students are invited to 
take advantage of this opportunity of 
learning the art of self defense. These 
classes are being conducted in con- 
junction with the present national 
program of making our youth physi- 
cally fit in case they are called for 
military service. The wrestling 
classes under the supervision of Jim 
Diacumukas, will also meet the same 
hour and days. 




CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber, Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone 5 



Stevens 



"Big" Jim Stevens, fleet Sho'man 
forward was accepted, this week, : 
the United States Naval Reserve Air 
Corps. 



The First 
National Bank 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chester town, Md. 



D O R F ' S 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 

High Street 



Some sport swrite is and authorities 
about the nation believe the rationing 
of autos and tires will be a boon to 
baseball. They argue that peopl 
forced to remain at home, will turn to 
the national pastime for amusement 
Many league and club official' 
throughout the country hope the pre 
dictions are correct. 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONN ETTS 
DEPT. STORE 



-oo— 



"Dumb Shots?" 

One of the Sho'men fans 
down town wants to know that 
if the Sho'men were called 
"Kiblermen" when Kibler was 
coaching, will they be called 
"Dumb Shots" now that Dum- 
schott is coaching. 



Tuesday night was a big night for 
the girls who go out for basketball. 
The first scrimmage of the present 
season was played by nearly all the 
girls. 

Miss Doris is trying to work out the 
teams to the best advantage for the 
girls and with all fairness in mind. 

Several of the teams have been 
broken up because of those girls who 
did not return, while some of the oth- 
er teams will remain the same. 

At the G. I. A. A., which met on 
Tuesday, it was decided that the last 
years' champion team, the present 
juniors, would not be broken up, as 
reported, but would remain the same 
as last year. 

The freshmen girls seem to be cat- 
ching on to the tricks of the game 
very quickly and it is possible that 
this freshman team may cause a little 
worry for some of the upperclassmen. 



Lefty Addis Copple, former Wash- 
ington College hurler whose baseball 
contract belongs to the Pittsburgh 
Pirates, is now in an officer's training 
school. Drafted as a private, Coppie 
was one of a number chosen from the 
camp where he was located for train- 
ing for commissions. 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Tydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



Choose 

Hochschild, Kohn & Co. 

for correct 

Campus and College Wear 



The Week's Court Schedule 



Tonight — Baltimore U He 

Tomorrow Night — Delaware Away 

Tuesday Johns Hopkins Away 

Friday — Maryland Away 



Meet Your Class Mates 

—at — 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



HADAWAY GROCERY 
Meats and Vegetables 

Phone 37 
Cross Street, Chestertown 



PAINT 

for EVERY need 

"Time-Tested Products" 

The GUdden Company 

21 N. Liberty Street 

Baltimore, Maryland. 



See 

OTIS 

For The HAIRCUT 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
— For— 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A complete line supplies plus all texts 
For all classes 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



1941 In Review 

(Continued from Page 1) 
lame of May 17 
Sho'men nine lose first league tilt 
to Loyola 11-8 causing them to drop 
third in League. 

ODK taps Dr. Buxton, Dave Barto- 
lini. Lloyd Davis, Bill Nagler, and Al- 
Lri Mooney: 

lay Kirby wins special election ov- 
Harry Lore for president of the 
gludcnt Council. Dave Bartolini is 
selected president of his class. Peg- 
jy Pitt is elected president of Reid 
Kail Council. 

Spielman retires as ELM editor. 
Culvert Jones assumes position set- 
"All-American" as goal for pap- 



Issue of May 24 
James Spielman is named as reci- 
ient of the Gold Pentagon awarded 
y Omicron Delta Kappa. 
Final examinations begin. 
Plans for June Week are complet- 
ed. Don Peeples is signed for June 



Issue of October 31 
Bartolini, Clark, Davis, Johnson, 
Jones, Kirby, Lore, Mooney, and 

Smith named to Who's Who in Amer- 
ican Colleges and Universities. 

Dean Livingood discloses that 
smooching was reason for closing of 
library stacks. 

Sororities pledge twenty-four girls. 

Basketball practice begins. 



Issue of September 19 

ELM issues first twelve-page pap- 
er. 

Three hundred three students reg- 
ister. 

Coleman and Kline added to facul- 
ty. 

New cut system is put into immed- 
iate use. Unlimited cuts are award- 
ed for 2.25 index. 



neral 



Issue of September 26 
Campus leaders divided in ■ 
f cut system. Men give 
>k.y. 

'Over 300 years of democracy will 

not be overthrown" says Dr. Mead in 

■■ . ■!<; the 160th academic year. 

Minor Steele, Majorie Starr, and 

Rufus Johnson awarded faculty 

scholarship. 



Issue of October 3 
Final registration placed at 322. 
J. "Reds" Burke speaks at assem- 

y- 

Chief Newton discovers rusty cyl- 
inder, part of 31-year-old tradition. 



Issue of October 10 
First pep rally is held before Blue 
Jay game. Sho'men picked to win 

cord throng 
Homecoming. 



re anticipated for 



6-0, 



Issue of October 17 

Sho'men win over Hopkins, 
Homecoming features pajama pa- 
rade, bonfire and dances as team 
meets Randolph-Macon. 

Sorority statistics are given for 
benefit of freshmen. 

ELM plans fashion show. 



Issue of October 24 

Co-eds exhibit latest college fash- 
ions in ELM fashion show. 

Theta Chi's, and Zcta's lead college 
in scholarship for the month. 

Mr. Coleman closes the stacks to 
the students. 

College dance orchestra is formed 
by Francis Mead. 



Issue of November 7 
Faculty Committee on Student 
Activities gives permission to ELM to 
lonsor All-College Night. 

Jim Svcc named temporary chair* 
ian of Freshman Class. 

Don Smith announces that '42 Pe- 
asus will be informal. 



As Jap Bombers Saw Manila Target 







This striking aerial view of Manila was made from an altitude 
comparable to that at which bombers operate. In flat defiance of Inter- 
nationa) law tbe Japs bombed Manila after it had been declared an 
"open" or undefended city. Gen. Douglas MacArthur, commander of 
V. S. forces in the Philippines, baa called for retaliatory measures 
against the Japanese "at tbe proper time." 



Issue of November 14 

Football squad petitions coach on 
behalf of Ray Kirby. 

Over 200 items of art are exhibit- 
ed in college library to celebrate Na- 
tional Art Week. 

Sho'men tie Ursinus 0-0. 

Thanksgiving holidays begin. 

Issue of November 28 

All-College Night is held. Minor 
Steele and Dave Bartolini elected Mr. 

d Miss Washington. 

Washington College tops all col- 
leges in inter-fraternity scholarship. 

Freshmen defeat Sophomores 7-6 

traditional grid battle. 

Sho'men lose to Delaware 18-6. 



Issue of December 5 
Washington Players open their sea- 
son with "Smilin' Through." Discov- 
new star in Joan Johnston. 




Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Phone 132W 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

Service 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 



WILLIAM'S 
Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



▼ 

Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

A 



All-College Night termed a tre- 
mendous success.by the student body. 

Y, W. C. A. sponsors an exhibit of 
100 Christmas cards. 



Issue of December 12 

Washington College holds special! 
war assembly. Dr. Mead and Coach 
Kibler speak. 

Mayor orders practice blackout fo 
Chestertown. 

Cagers open season in armory 
against Salisbury. 

Yerkes, Dudderar and Kirby named 
to All-Maryland berths. Yerkes nam 
ed captain by unanimous count. 



College completes blackout in for- 
ty seconds. 

Lew Yerkes and Al Dudderar men 
tioned for Little All-American team. 

Pentagon wins over Salisbury then 
loses three straight on Pennsylvania 
tour - . 



Issue of December 19 
ODK creates extra-curricular 
,'ard for leadership. 



MACK'S 

RADIO 

SHOP 
Kent News Building 



CHESTERTOWN 

BANK 

OF 

MARYLAND 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 


Everything Needed 


for 


Building 



Gill's 

Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 




Intra* Murals 



With the season half over, the two 
best teams in the tournament, as yet, 
have not met each other. The Soph- 
omores look to be the strongest with 
such players as Munyan, Lynch, Sin- 
clair, Nowak, Pletts, and Freeman 
but the Lambda Chi's also have a 
formidable squad composed of Nag- 
Clark, Smith, Gorman, Taylor 
and Maguire and should give the 
Sophs quite a battle. 

In previous games the Sophomores 
have been running away with all op- 
position while the Lambdas have suf- 
fered one defeat at the hands of the 
Freshmen. In some of the games 
played this week the Sophs romped 
over the seniors by the score of 47 to 
16 while the K. A.'s had an easy time 
(Continued on Page 6) 



KENT COUNTY 

FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Phone 173 



CUMBERLAND COAL 
COMPANY 

Producers Wholesalers 
Retailers 

"Stohol" Stokers 

217 E. Redwood St. 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



LIGHT.. 



POWER 



From 



Chestertown 
Electric Light 
and Power Co. 



. . . Phone 333 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



Fulton Grand 
Laundry Co. 

Finer Grade Launderers '• 
Baltimore, Md. 



C0RKHILL 
FRANKS 

ARE GOOD 
ANYTIME 

Every Time! 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



For those little things 
you are always needing 
in your room and for 
dress — 

Stop in at — 

FOX'S 

5c to $1.00 Store 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 1942 



Students Are Mickey And Judy At New Lyceum 

Above National 
I. Q. Average 



Livingood Reveals Average I 

Q. At Washington College 

Is Between 115 And 120 



The intrlliccnt quotient of the av- 
erage Washington College student i* 
between 115 and 120, psychologi 
tests given by Dr. Livingood to th< 
college classes reveal. 

In addition, these tests show thai 
the average Washington College 
freshman is above the average for th< 
colleges of the United States, 

The present program of psycholo- 
gical tests for all the classes has been 
in effect for the past years, Dr. Liv- 
ingood informed. Complete files for 
tho past ten graduating classes are 
kept by the administration. 

On the basis of the general psy- 
chological examination given to all 
four classes this fall, the median 
gross scores for the respective class- 
es were as follows: Seniors 62, Jun- 
iors 59.6, Sophomores 60 and Fresh- 
men 55,3. The average gross score 
for the college is 59.2, or an average 
intelligence quotient score between 
115 and 120, according to Dr. Livin- 
good. 

The American Council Psychologi- 
cal Examination given each year lo 
freshmen generally finds Washington 
College above the average for the col- 
leges of the United States, Norms for 
this test are given to participating 
colleges each May with the code num- 
ber of the college. Last year the 
mean score for all colleges was 
103.55, whereas W. C. freshmen scor 
ed 104.68 on the gross scores. Norms 
for the present Freshman Class will 
not be available until May, 1942. 
Examination of a table of class 




Where 
Were You? 



Sinclear Lewis in class . . . Th« 
Lleweilyn-Graber combination fc^ 
them all guessing . . . The latest *,. 
bulletin to come to Rcid Hall is that 
Maguire is still on the campus. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



Mickey Ruoncy and Judy Garland star in "Babes On Broadway", 
featured at the New Lyceum Theatre on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. 



NORTHEAST 
^CORNER 



(Continued from Page 2) 
of raising the general physical tone of 
college men by an immediately in- 
creased program of physical educa- 
tion. Opportunities for voluntary 
participation are already being given 
everywhere, and compulsory measures 
will be taken if at all necessary. 

Strong recommendations were 
made also for the wider study of the 
geography of the world; its resources 
and its economic conflicts, and for 
coui^es to clarify the issues of the 
present war and increase the under 
scores since their entrance shows that! standing of the fundamentals of 



the medium gross score of each class 
tends to increase from year to year 
due to the elimination of porrer stu- 
dents and due to improved work hab- 
its. The practice element plays lit- 
tle or no part in improvement since 
the construction of the tests provides 
for the practice element. 

Dr. Livingood stated that psycholo- 
gical examination test scores of stu- 
dents tend to remain relatively con- 
stant, particularly during the last 
three years, if the freshman test it- 
disregarded as largely a practice 
test. "A study made of the present 
senior class shows that the average 
variation of scores for all four years 
is a plus or minus 3.57. Comparing 
the scores for the last two years the 
average variation is plus or minus 
1.8. Using sixty-six members of the 
senior class whose records are com- 
plete in the comparison of scores for 
junior and senior years, eight mem- 
bers of the class had identical scores, 
twelve varied one point, seven varied 
three points and ten members varied 
four points. 

Fifty-six per- cent of the class did 
not vary more than four points 
their psychological examination 
scores for the final two years. The 
fact that scores tend to remain rela- 
tively constant would indicate that 
these examinations have considerable 
value in estimating intelligence, par- 
ticularly if a sufficiently large num- 
ber of tests are given to compensate 
for variable factors. 

Sixty-four per cent of the seniors 
have inquired to learn their intelli- 
gence quotients, Dr. Livingood as- 
serted. Before results ore given, 
each senior is asked to estimate his 
intelligence quotient. The majority 
of students are modest and underes- 
timate, the Dean said. Of the group 
who inquired, sixty-two per cent were 
able to estimate within five points of 
the average I, Q. for the four year 
It would appear that most students 
have a good general idea of thei: 
ability even befole they learn psy- ^ 
chological examination results. 



American cit: 

The cooper 

Civilian Defe 



senship 

of the colleges in 
as also urged. 
-Gilbert W. Mead. 



-on— 



A daughter was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. E. Clarke Fontaine on Decern 
ber 31, 1941. 



On behalf of the entire stu- 
dent body, the ELM wishes to 
express sympathy to Jim Criss 
on the loss of his father and to 
Jim Juliana on the loss of his 
sister. 



(Continued from Page 2) 
there.' Ask Doc if Dutch has a tem- 
per. 

Carney came in for supper Sunday 
Night . . . Now that the kids skate 
.town at the club, Val Lentz has plen-l 
ty of chance to keep up his social life 
with the high school . . . Fran Harris, 
vanted everyone to be sure to see 
that ring on her third finger, left 
hand. Congratulations . . . 'Tis rum- 
>ied that our editor would like to vis- 
it our business manager more often 
— when his sister's home. 

Now that cold weather has set in, 
it's a bit more difficult for the boys to 
get up to the club house . . . Lucilla 
swears she'll quit Contemporary Lit 
if Doc Werner doesn't stop reading 



Sign Up For A 

Second Semester 

Correspondence Course 

in Shopping at 

mrrzLEK. bpqthers e 



Intra-Murals . . . 

(Continued from Page 5) 
defeating East Hall 21 to 15. In the 
final game of the day, the Day Stu- 
dents were no match for Lambda Chi 

d lost 23 to 6. 

Tuesday's games produced a thrill- 
in the East Hall and West Hall 
game with East Hall finally coming 
out on top 16 to 14. In the other 
game of the day the Day Students de- 
feated the Juniors 23 to 19. 

As an added attraction, there will 
be two intra-mural games preceding 
the Varsity game Friday night. These 
games will find the Lambda Chi team 
playing the Freshmen and the Kappa 
Alpha team playing Theti Chi. These 
games should prove very interesting. 



Mary Jeanne Strong was hostess at 
a shower given in the honor of Mar- 
garet Anne Brice during the Christ- 
mas holidays.- 



Charles Dimmling & Co. 

Quality Meats and Poultry 

Stores and Institutions 

Supplied 

"We are not afraid to boast 
When it comes to tender roast" 

602 S. Broadway, 
Baltimore, Md. 



\\\\\\N\\\\\\\\%\WSW\\UX\\«WVWM\S\\\H\\W\\\\ 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



/ 



MON. - TUES. - WED., JAN. 12 - 13 - 14 

America's Terrific Twosome In Their 
Newest Hit and Their Best Yet. 

MICKEY ROONEY - JUDY GARLAND 

— in — 

"BABES ON BROADWAY" 

For fun, for music, for spectacular enter- 
tainment this one tops all the rest. 

THUR. - FRI. - SAT., JAN. 15 - 16 - 17 
— Tops Everything In Thrills — 

ERROL FLYNN - FRED MacMURRAY 

— in — 

"DIVE BOMBER" 

— Filmed In Technicolor — 

Here come Uncle Sam's dive bombing 
squadrons. The planes, the men, the new 
equipment the whole world is talking 
about. 



—NEXT WEEK- 
GARY COOPER as "SERGEANT YORK" 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

LGGCl S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 




No Cramming Necessary! 

For swell flavor and 

real chewing fun -the 

answer is delicious 

Wrigley's Spearmint Gum 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 




ALM1U 



••••• 

"V" 

•••*• 



Vol XLI. No. 15. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1942 



Price Five Cents 



College Announces Special War Measures; 
Spring Recess Cut, Activities Are Curbed, 
1 8-Hour Load, Extra Sessions Scheduled 



Figure In "History Of Crises" Lectures 



Decisions Were Reached At Special Meeting Of College 

Emergency Committee ; Dr. Mead Makes Announcement 

In Special Assembly Of Students At Noon Today 




In order to provide for students going to extended summer 
school or who expect to have defense industry jobs for the sum- 
mer, the second semester will be shortened and Commencement 
will be advanced by two weeks. The announcement was made 
in assembly by Dr. Mead at noon today. It was also announced 
that the average student load will be 18 hours. A few new 
courses have been created to provide a greater selection but, 
principally, there will be a modification within the courses al- 
ready, given. These decisions were made by the College 
Emergency Committee at a special meeting yesterday. 

Dr. Mead announced that it would be possible to shorten 
the term by shortening Spring Vacation and the examination 
period and by holding extra sessions of the regularly scheduled 



Dr. Mead 



ngood 



Above are pictured three of the speakers figuring in the "History of the Crises" series 
lectures being sponsored by the Historical Society. The series, which contains nine lec- 
tures on all the various phases of the crises, will begin in February and will be given in the 
auditorium at dates to be announced later. The general public will be invited to attend. 



Victory Book Tea 
Here On Tuesday 

Mis. Jones, Chairman of the Vic- 
lory Book Campaign, announced that 
would be held from 3 to 5 Tues- 
day in the Museum Room of the 
Ibvary. At that time, students will 
1,1 •■ ked to donate all types of books 
for men in the armed forces. 

All kinds of books are needed." 
[wording to the appeal, which was is- 
;uli| by Mrs. J. S. W. Jones, chairman 
of the campaign in Kent. "Our men 
many books, millions of them, to 
help keep up their morale, to aid 
Ihem in their technical training, tc 
imuse and divert them in their leis- 
u ve moments. 



Alpha Chis Sponsor Card Party 

To Aid British Children's Relief 



Among the new courses being offered are two in the Biolo- 
gy Department. For those expecting to go into defense indus- 
try, a 3-hour course in methods of Laboratory Technique will be 
given. Also will be a 1-hour course in Entomology. 

In the Physics Department, with sufficient demands, Dr. 
Coop will offer a course in Applied Electricity which was not 
scheduled for the coming semester. This course offers oppor- 
tunities in all methods of electric signalling. 

To meet the problems of particular situations, adaption of 
the material will be made in English, History and Government. 
Many of the one and two-hour courses are being made into 3- 
hour courses. 

Dr. Mead also announced that Physical Education will be 
required of all male members of the Junior, Sophomore and 
Freshman Classes next semester. In the following school year, 
it will be required of all male students. 



The call from the Alpha Chis is to 
"Come play cards for defense to- 
night." The first effort on the cam- 
pus to raise money for national de- 
fense will be under the sponsorship 
of Alpha Chi Omega at 8 o'clock to- 
night, Friday, in Hodson Hall. 

The tastes of all should be satisfied 
as the evening affords not only 

I Bridge and Five Hundred, but also 
Rummy and Monopoly. Since the 
latter two games were not included in 

I the original plans, and so as not to 
decrease the donation for national de- 
fense, no prizes will be offered for 



the latter two games. 

The money received from the card 
party will be divided between the 
American Red Cross and the Ameri- 
can Hostels for Bomb Shocked Brit- 
ish Children. 

The patronesses of the sorority i 
have shown great cooperation. Mrs. 
R. Barrel, Mrs. Charles Kingley andj 
Mrs. Frank Simpers have donated a 
part of the refreshments. 



According to the U. S. Census Bur- 
eau it requires 17 billion tin cans an- 
nually to supply the demand in the 
United States. 



Dr. Mead Favors Mascot Adoption 



I am very much interested in the 
Movement sponsored by the ELM for 
the selection of an official mascot or 
''totem" for the College, and I hope 
if will be carried forward to a suc- 
l ' tul conclusion. The lack of such 
'mbol has been felt often, and 
some talk of remedying the situation 
,l occasionally been indulged, but 
never with an opportunity such as 

">w presents itself. 

The "totem" is older than civiliza- 
tion, and at least as widespread. The 
application of the idea to American 
colleges is almost universal. For the 
convenience of the general public, the 

Ports writers and the news editors. 
"lis has been so spread that some of 
the designations are familiar to ev- 
'lie, as the Yale Bulldog, the 
Princeton Tiger, the Brown Bear 



and, in our more immediate territory,! 
of course, the Terrapin of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Even the Blue 
Hen of Delaware has an appeal to 
public imagination. 

Fifteen years ago, in the days of 
the greatest basketball five of our his- 
tory, the term "Flying Pentagon" 
was devised, applied at times to 
Washington College in general. It 
did not take with the public as a gen- 
eral designation. It is too esoteric 
in symbolism, and it is difficult to get 
excited over a geometrical figure, ev- 
en with its wings. 

The geographical designation, 
Shoremen (often Sho'men) is a fav- 
orite with some news writers, but it 
cannot be visualized as a proper 
symbol, as a "totem" should. 

There seem to be two general class- 
es of totems in collegiate use. There 



are those with definite regional char- 
acteristics like the Terrapin, or the 
Wisconsin Badger, the Pitt Panther, 1 
or the Texas "Longhorns." Some 
are as distinctly recognized without 
special regional reasons, like the 
Army mule (army grey, possibly), or 
the Navy goat. Some develop from 
a name, as Allegheny College (the 
'Gators) despite the fact that there' 
are no alligators near Allegheny Col- 
lege. 

Of course there are popular team 
names which are historic rather than 
depending upon a visible symbol. ' 
Such are "The Generals" of Wash- 
ington and Lee, "The Cavaliers" of 
Virginia, and others. We have in- 
deed a good campus symbol in the 
Washington elm, but you cannot name 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Extra-Curricular Activities Curtailed 

Dean's Office, January 15. — Eighteen semester hours is the 
new minimum work load of students with average indices "set 
by the faculty at their January meeting Monday night. This 
one-semester hour increase, which applies to freshmen as well, 
is one of the means adoptedTo accelerate the scholastic pro- 
gram. 

In addition to this, three other rulings were made. The 
faculty decided that physical education will be required of all 
male students in the freshman, sophomore and junior classes, 
and it was strongly recommended but optional for senior men. 

Two other rulings, which go into effect immediately, were 
made by the Faculty Activities Committee. They not only pre- 
vent the inauguration of any new activities on the campus this 
year, but reduce the time now devoted to extra-curricular or- 
ganizations as well. 

"The present emergency demands that Washington College 
take steps in accord with the action of other colleges in revising 
the present program, curricular and extra-curricular, to meet 
the needs of our present emergency," Dr. Livingood said. 

On Thursday, January 9, therefore two faculty committees 
met to consider steps to be taken in having the College program 
conform with the present trends. A representative faculty 
committee consisting of the officers of the Administration and 
representatives of the several divisions of instruction met to 
consider provisions looking toward an accelerated program. 
Their two recommendations, concerning the eighteen hour min- 
imum and the new physical education program, were passed by 
the faculty Monday evening. 

The Faculty Activities Committee recommended that all 
extra-curricular organizations be asked to examine their pro- 
grams and reduce the time devoted to the various extra-curricu- 
lar fields, and that no new activities be inaugurated for the re- 
mainder of the present college year. 

"From the above action looking toward an accelerated pro- 
gram for all students plus additional requirements in physical 
education it is evident that no new activities, such as the propos- 
ed operetta, could be initited at this time the Faculty and admin- 
istration continue to believe in the value of a well-rounded ex- 
tra-curricular program as a very valuable supplement to the 
academic program," Dr. Livingood explained. "During the ex- 
isting emergency, however, increased attention must be devoted 
to the academic program with the probability of general accel- 
eration of work in the entire college, in addition to increased 
work in some departments. In this program I know we sha^I 
have the student support for the emergency." 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OP WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 



1933-Crowds Gather To Hear . 



Editorial Staff 

Associate Editor . ..... Frances Kreeger 

Associate 



Editor Mary Landon Russell 



Sports Editor 



John Kardash 



Business Staff 



Business Manager 



Rufus C. Johnson 



Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



Member 

Associated Golle6iale Press 

Distributor of 

Golle6iateDi6est 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Coltrst Publiihen Rtpraeniathe 

420 MADISON AVE. NEW YORK, N.Y 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1942 



fli 



re- 

Therefore, 
announced 



Washington College Takes Steps 

The students of Washington College will begin to feel the 
first real effects of the war beginning next semester when sev- 
eral changes adopted by the facuUy and administration will go 
into effect. 

Male students will feel the results more than the women 
when they will be asked to extend their physical education 
courses to four years, rather than two in addition to increasing 
their average load to eighteen hours. By thes'e means, the Col 
lege hopes to produce finished students who are physically 
in less time. 

To cooperate with the government in these ways will 
quire undivided attention upon the task at h, 
the Faculty Committee on Student Activities uas •wuwoi 
that permission will not be granted for the inauguration of new ! 
activities. This does not mean that the usual dances will not be 
held nor does it mean that extra-curricular activities will be 
banned completely. It merely means that students will be ask- 
ed to reduce their present extra-curricular activities to a mini- 
mum. 

In order that Senior men may finish college as soon as pos- 
sible, the Faculty and Administration has found it advisable to] 
eliminate Spring Recess in order that Commencement may be ' 
moved up one week. In the place of the usual spring vacation, 
students will be given several days during the Easter time. It 
is also quite possible that Daylight Saving Time be used in the | 
near future. 

One of the most important parts of this accelerated pro- 
gram is the complete understanding and cooperation of the Stu-j 
dent Body. They must realize that the country is in a state of! 
national emergency and that they are as much a part of the de-' 
f ense mechanism of the country as are the men and women in 
uniform. They must realize that there will be certain hard- 
ships but they must also realize that members of the Faculty 
and Administration and those at home will be suffering similar 
hardships at the same time. 

As was said in assembly last week, we must remember that 
we are all in the army now. We shall do the task immediately 
before us and we shall do it to the best of our ability until that 
time when we are transferred or called to other duty. 



-The Editor's Desk- 



The publication of the examination 
schedule in this week's paper brings 
to our mind the unpleasant task of 
completing about four, term-papers. 
A three-semester year maye have its 
advantages but we hope it can't hap- 
pen here . . . Comes time when one 
simply must buckle down. A social 
calendar with not a single entry looks 
a bit hopeless — but there are those 
who wish they had examinations to 
take . . . With this issue, tiie ELM 
completes just half of its scheduled 
papers. The Associated Collegiate 
Press has just collected the files and 
application blanks for classification 
which will be released in April. The 
time between these two dates will be 
an anxious one for the editor and bus- 
iness manager. 

Rumor has it that there will be 
no Spring Recess this year and 
there are all indications that this 
might be true. However, as of 
Wednesday at noon, there had been 
no official announcement from the 
President's Office to that effect . . . 
The YMCA DID refuse to abandon 
its key for the new ODK extra-cur- 
ricular activities key just as we had 



anticipated in last week's ELM. 
Just what turn this will bring in the 
course of events remains in the 
hands of Chairman Rufus Johnson 
and the other members of ODK . . . 
Registrar Howell and Business 
Manager Johns refuse to comment 
on the coming enrollment but it is 
our theory that not more than ten 
students now enrolled will be miss- 
ing in February. Of course, this 
does not include some few Fresh- 
men. 
The other day, we became familiar 
with poi {Hawaiian for paste). It 
seems as though they eat the stuff ov- 
er there on the Islands. You eat it 
with your fingers, using either one or 
two fingers according to the size of 
the mouth. According to Eiko, they 
also eat raw fish. Oh well, we guess 
they're happy . . . We see by the pap 
crs that Goueher College expects to 
move into its new buildings by next 
Fall. Dormitories are being built 
first. The Baltimore U. BALOO if 
running editorials to persuade the ad- 
ministration of that school to buy the 
old Goueher buildings. Perhaps they 
can get a basketball team from Gou- 
eher, too. 








. F. D.RAt Washington College 




THIS 'n' THAT or The Reason Why' 



Once in every editor's life (and 
he's lucky if it only happens once) 
there comes what may be genedally 
termed "an editor's nightmare." It 
may be a breakdown of machinery. It 
may be a late news break that caus- 
es him to break down his whole pap- 
er and then it may be the failure of 
:iis staff to provide him with the nec- 
essary material to fill his paper. 

The latter is just what has happen- 
ed to the editor of the ELM this week. 
Out of a staff of nineteen members, 
less than half of them turned in copy 
which necessitates this long thesis on 
absolutely nothing. 

As a matter of fact, even Dr. Mead 
failed to turn in his "Northeast Cor- 
ner" this week. But with all these 
special Faculty and Administrative 
meetings, we can easily see how it 
could happen that he didn't have time 
to write it. However, we cannot see 
reasons why the whole staff should 
fall down. 



Speaking of newspapers reminds us 
of the play that was given in assem- 
bly yesterday. Even in the daylight 
it seemed that the Players did their- 
selves proud. Lloyd Davis was at his 
best as Daniel Webster, especially 
when it came time to kiss the bride. 
We wondered at the time if that sec- 
ond kiss was in the script. 

Out California way, at Los Angeles 
City College, blackouts are a common 
thing. We can just imagine what a 
surprise blackout would be at Wash- 
ington College. Along about eight 
o'clock, the siren would blow and it 
would take at least a half hour for 
most of the college students to real- 
ize that it was a blackout, if they 
heard it at all. Inside of an hour, 
perhaps the lads in the fraternity 
houses and the dormitories would be 
able to leave the campus below Reid 
Hall long enough to dash across the 
street and turn out the lights. 



Of course, it the Reid Hall drawiag 
room, there would be no trouble, 
seems as though there is an eternal 
blackout down there and just ma^ 
some of the Council members 
sick for words" — just like tn e > 
wouldn't do the same thing if tne ' 
weren't invested with that Strang 1 
power that goes with Council men* 
hers. 

We could go on and give some re* 
lowdown on what would happen in ' 
surprise blackout but it might pro* 1 
a bit embarrassing to some. Tn» 
would be "plainly obvious." 
Tolles, please note. 

Well, in about ten minutes, w< 
written all this and we admit 
haven't said a darn thing but it r^ 
ly fills up space. One might call * 
the Editor's Desk extended but ff e 
rather you just forget you ever re* 
it. Anything in this paper that )o& 
funny is just there to fill up space. 



Sport The^^TOm Secti 



ion 



fRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM CHESTERTOWN, MD, 



PAGE THREE 



Kardash's 
Corner 



With 40 seconds to go, and the 

src 39-36 against them, "Moose" 
jlcNilT sank a long shot from mid- 
t and Frank Samele dropped in 
the K iime winning toss in one of the 
beat games of the Bees-Maroon riv- 
alry. In a nip and tuck battle, the 
Sho'men, unwitting spirit and determ- 
ination, eked out a breath-taking vic- 
tory, 40-39, in 1939, the Maroons, 
likewise, vanquished a strong and 
favorite Bee five by one point, 41-40. 

Conch Fred Dumschott's confidence 
his player* was particularly not- 

^able. He staled, before the en- 
counter, in the dressing room. "I 
want you boys to be on the go every 
(c. Keep moving and play like 
■ in it. If you get tired, there 
ire plenty of other boys who can 
llep in there until you're rested." 
And following this brief oration, the 
Maroon players displayed a brand of 
ketball which onlookers won't for- 

[ for quite a while. 

Then on Saturday night, Delaware 
upset the Maroons 37-30 with an ef- 
'ective zone defense. For the first 
fine this season, the Sho'men en- 
tountered a zone defense; nnd also, 
he initial time, that they have played 
tin tuch a small court. These two 
actors definitely enabled the Blue 
lens to subdue their arch foe. But, 
t probably will be a different story 
vhen the Delaware boys trek down to 
Jhestertown and endeavor to repeat 
heir previous performance. Take 
leetl, Blue Hens! 

order for the fast-moving attack 
di the Sho'men to function properly, 

■ions court is necessary. No 

ithcr team in the league can equal 

he potential speed possessed by the 

iho' quint. A fast break, the figure 

and offside plays with the idea of 

nlinuing moving the ball is the bas- 
* of Coach Dumschott's strategy. 
Wilh such capable performers as Mc- 
Wff, Samele,* Gibe, Yerkes, Stevens, 
Voith and Benjamin, this style of 

y should result in success. But, as 

ifue in all sports, any team, re- 
[irdless of their strength, experienc- 
; ups and downs. Washington 
-ollege should definitely finish in the 
!'■!■. of the Mason-Dixon Loop 
Jarring injuries or other serious hin- 
ces. 

ue Ridge College, according to 
recent reports, has dropped out of the 
Uason-Dixon Conference. The rea- 
ptts for this drastic action was due 
!o Hie shortage of players and the se- 
Sctive service board which has been 
draining many other boys engaged in 
pieties. Thus, Blue Ridge faces 
foe possibility of having to abandon 
'II sports, spring and winter. 

Rhyme of the week: 
The Maroons and Bee were battling 
it out, 

And the Maroons needed two shots, 
Then, there rang out tremendous 
shouts, 

For the Bees were stung by two 
Dumb Shots! 

Predictions: Shor'men to lose a 
: °uph one to Maryland but subdue 
:h e Mounts. 



Maroons Tangle With Mounts Tomorrow 
At Armory; Favored In 3rd League Game 



Flying Dutchmen Will Be Fav 

ored Over Mount St. Mary's 

Here Tomorrow 



The Flying Dutchmen will attempt 
to break a two-game losing streak 
and a jinx at the same time tonight 
when they meet Maryland at College 
Park in a non-league contest. Mary- 
land is a member of the Southern 
Conference. The Maroons, aided by 
a large floor, will be able to employ 
all their speed and aggressiveness 
against the Terps. Although Mary- 
land will be the favorite, Coach 
"Dutch" Dnmschott points to the 
fact that Baltimore U. was also plac- 
ed in the favored list. 

Tomorrow night, Saturday, the 
Sho'men will return to the armory 
floor where they will play Mt. St. 
Mary's in their third league tilt. The 
Mountaineers are one of the two 
teams below Washington in the lea- 
gue standing, having lost three 
games. It will be a comparative 
breather after the Maryland tilt this 
evening. 

On Thursday, the Dutchmen will 
give the Baltimore Bees a return 
match at Baltimore, Even after hav- 
ing defeated the Bees by the close 
margin of one point last week, the 
Baltimore lads will get the nod on 
their home court. 



Miss Bell Names 
Tentative Teams 
For Basketball 



Girls Find Disappointments 

And Rewards In Opening 

Of Basketball Season 



Mason-Dixon Conference 

(At of Tuesday, Jan. 13) 

r **m W L Pet 

Loyola 4 1.000 

f^eitern Maryland 2 1.000 

'dolph-Macoo 1 1.000 

Delaware 1 1.000 

C "tholi c U. 4 1 .800 

J °b n8 Hopkins 4 1 .800 

American U. 1 2 .333 

G alludet 1 3 .250 



"Smart Shots" or 

"Flying Dutchmen?" 

The Washington Courtmen 
seemed to prove in the Balti- 
more University game that the 
name of "Dumb Shots" that 
was bestowed upon them by a 
spectator was not fitting. Bet- 
ter it should have been "Smart 
Shots." Now, at another sug- 
gestion which the ELM has 
picked up, the locals should be 
called the "Flying Dutchmen" 
after Coach "Dutch" Dum- 
schott. 



Dutchmen Lose 
First Two Tilts 
Of Conference 



Wins Over Baltimore; Loses To 

Delaware And Blue Jays 

In League Battles 



In the girls' intra-mural basketball 
teams, many teams have been weak- 
ened by severe losses while others 
are strengthened by new finds. Al- 
though it is impossible to pick each 
team definitely at this time, Miss 
Bell, Director, has made the follow- 
ing selections. These are incom- 
plete : 

Freshman Red Team — Ann Boiling, 
Alice Sutherland, Mariana Everngam, 
Eleanor Newton, Peggy Gilland, and 
Betty Nash. 

Freshman White Team — Harriet 
Olson, Marie Thornton, Joan John- 
ston, Ruth Broadwater, Charlotte 
Hignutt, and Vera Goodwin with Dor- 
othy Lewis as a substitute. 

Sophomore Blue Team — Betty Hill, 
Laura Raiuey, Pat Frary, Mary Lu | 
Truslow and Dorothy Riedy. 

Sophomore White Team — Pete 
Hammond, Sally Waesche, Betty Loh- 
multer, lima Rogers, Jean Phillips, 
and Dola Sylvester. 

Junior Army Team — Lois Stevens, 
Hilda Hotchkiss, Edith Bishop, Jane 
Lyon, Jean Wood, and Ann Fender- 
son with Babe Harris as a reserve. 

Junior Navy Team — Helen Culver, 
Virginia Cooper, Naomi Russell, El- 
len Peters, Betty Doekhorn, and 
Phyllis Peters. 

Senior "A" Team — Frances Kree- j 
ger, Peggy Pitt, Alice Johanns, Vir- : 
ginia Hoopes, Kitty Newton, andi 
Mary Nardi. 

Senior "B" Team — Mary Liz 
Humphries, Minor Steele, Mary Kint- 1 
ner, Lannie Russell, Maria Petry and 
Ellen Bordley. 

Bridgewater 2 .000 

Washington College 2 .000 

Mt. St. Mary's 3 .000 

i Towson O 4 .000 



The Blue Jay courtmen of Johns 
Hopkins nosed out the Sho'men in a 
close 45-42 contest at Homewood 
Tuesday night. The Jays, paced by 
Bud Tannenbaum and Phil Knitz who 
scored 13 and 12 points respectively, 
were out in front throughout the 
game. Loose guarding on the part 
of the Sho'men permitted the Hop- 
kins men to toss in outside shots re- 
peatedly. 

Following a close 40-39 victory ov- 
er Baltimore U., the Sho'men were 
defeated by Delaware's Blue Hens, 
37-30. Delaware, with a big team on 
a very small court, employed a zone 
defense which the Sho'men found im- 
pregnable. 

"Moose" McNiff and Frank Sa- 
mele, Sho'men guard and forward re- 
spectively, provided a Frank Merri- 
well finish that gave the 40-39 vic- 
tory to the Sho'men over Baltimore 
U. The Maroons, three points behind 
with less than 30 seconds to play, 
took the ball from outside and Moose 
McNiff swished a two-pointer 
through from mid-court. Guarding 
close from the basket, Lew Yerkes 
took the ball from the Bee forward, 
passed to Frank Gibe, passed to 
Frank Samele who dropped the sec- 
ond basket for the one point lead. 



A Sports Editorial 

by Frank Macielag 

A month or so ago, quite a few 
of the fellows around the campus 
petitioned George Ekaitis to con- 
duct boxing classes. They prom- 
ised to support these classes and 
had 20 or 25 fellows willing to 
form the nucleus of this enter- 
prise. 

These classes were started this 
past Monday and a disappointing 
group of 9 fellows showed up, but 
was increased to 13 when a few 
found out that Coach Ekaitis's 
main plan was to deal with funda- 
mentals instead of actual boxing. 

Coach Ekaitis expressed his 
opinion that it only proves that the 
male students of Washington Col- 
lege are soft and afraid of bloody 
hoses and cut lips and that they 
are only hurting themselves by 
staying away from these classes. 

In the next few years, while this 
national emergency will hold the 
destiny of all males of college age, 
it is the duty of each and everyone 
to make himself physically fit for 
the rigors of military service and 
the ability to withstand hardships. 
The people of the U. S. have the 
best spirit of any country in the 
world but that alone cannot win the 
war. We need men who can face 
the enemy fearlessly and have the 
stamina to withhold attacks. 

All this leads to one thing, do 
your part, take advantage of the 
opportunity to make yourself 
physically fit. You are welcome to 
enroll by simply making your pres- 
ence known in the class. 



Fulton Grand 
Laundry Co. 

Finer Grade Launderers 
Baltimore, Md. 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 

. . . phone 14 



Blue Ridge Drops Court Card 
Because Of Player Shortage 



Blue Ridge College announced 
Sunday that it would drop the re- 
mainder of its basketball schedule 
due to a shortage of players. After 
playing the first four games on their 
card, the Blue Ridge coaches found 
it impossible to continue the cage 
season without more reserves. 



Charles Dimmling & Co. 

Quality Meats and Poultry 

Stores and Institutions 

Supplied 

"We are not afraid to boast 
When it comes to tender roast" 

602 S. Broadway, 
Baltimore, Md. 



T 
Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

A 




GLENN MILLER, New Dance King, 

now broadcasting over Coatt-to- 

Coast C. B. S. Network, three timet 

weekly, for Chesterfield. 



The average silk worm cocoon is 
made up of 300,000 turns of silk fi- 
ber. The silk worm spins this at the 
rate of about 65 turns a minute. 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



WILLIAM'S 
Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



Gill's 

Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1942 



"Devil and Daniel Webster" Seen 
As The Best Of Assembly Series 



Davis, Mead, Parks, Cooper 

Have Lead Roles In 

One Act Play 



by Joan Johnston 

Yesterday' morning the assembly 
program of "The Devil and Daniel 
Webster", by Stephen Vincent Ben- 
et, with Lloyd Davis, Frank Mead, 
Rudy Parks, and Virginia Cooper car- 
rying the leading roles, called up en- 
thusiastic reports from all sides. It 
was by far the best assembly program 
to date. 

Rudy Parks as Jabez Stone sold his 
soul to the devil in return for mater- 
ial advancement. On Jabez' wedding 
night the devil comes to claim his 
own. Jabez, racked with remorse 
and despair, is willing to give up 
when Daniel Webster, played by 
Lloyd Davis, intercedes announcing 
that he will defend him as his lawyer. 
Frank Mead as Mr. Scratch, the dev- 
il, summons twelve villains of Amer- 
ican history from the nether regions 
to act as the jurors. Webster pleads 
and wins the case for Jabez. 

Lloyd Davis easily dominated each 
of his scenes. From the dry, hum- 
orous asides to the cogent appeal to 
the jury Davis equally well ran the 
gamut. He caught the theme when 
he softly began his address. 

Webster realizes that he need not 
shout and bellow in oration; the un- 
tarnished simplicity of the true Amer- 
ican way of life speaks for itself. 
Striking is the quiet, eloquent plea 
delivered not only for Jabez' sake, 
but also for that of posterity, which 
must perpetuate American ideals. In 
the words of Webster, Benet says 
that freedom is the very essence of 
all that America stands for. An 
American must be free; unless he is, 
he is not an American. The jurors 
realize, though they have ignomini- 
ously failed, they too were once men 
— Americans. Swayed by that mem- 
ory, they acquit Jabez. 

Frank Mead was very effective, en- 
tering in mock humility, greedily 
leering at Jabez. Noteworthy was 
his speech before the curtain when he 
summoned up the dead rascals in 
Beliefs poetic style. 

Rudy Parks' initial appearance on 
the boards at Washington College 
earned comments of pleased surprise 
from several sources. He handled 
his role quite naturally, making the 
audience feel the plight of his situa- 
tion. 

Three points of emotion occurred 
when Virginia Cooper, Mary Stone, 
unhesitatingly evinced her faith in 
Jabez; when she uttered her beauti- 



NORTHEAST 
^CORNER 



(Continued from Page 1) 

a student body or a team for a tree. 
Imagine the sports writer saying, 
"The Elms scored again in the eigh- 
th, but were cut down 1-2-3 in the 
ninth." 

The best totem of course, bears a 
symbolic relation to the outstanding 
characteristics which the possessor 
desires to encourage in himself and 
his associates. The panther, the 
bear, the bulldog, the tiger, the bad- 
ger — all of these typify something to 
the bearers of the totem. If to that 
is added something which even faint- 
ly echos matters of local history, 
pride, or ancient tradition or usage, 
the immediate value of the symbol is 
increased. If it is a totem widely 
rcognized for some superior inher- 
ent qualities, so much the better still. 
And if the name is easily handled by 
headline writers and slogan makers, 
it is a further great advantage. 

If the choice falls on something 
which has these qualities, with some 
dramatic element and some applica- 
bility to the spirit and historic back- 
ground of Washington College, it 



ful little prayer; when the reassuring 
sound of her voice came to Jabez in 
the midst of his troubles. 

Walter Falardeau dispensed justice 
with the correct air of boreuom and 
sneering superiority. Bob Pierce 
and Anne Boiling with Mort Garrison 
afforded the comic element, staying in 
character every minute. 

A last word of praise must be hand- 
ed to the chorus, especially the omi- 
nous chanting of the jury, admirably 
trained in only nine days. 



MID- YEAR EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



No change in this schedu 
Please report all conflicts 



le will be permitted without the consent of the Registrar, 
to the Registrar. 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1942 
9 A.M.- 12 M. 

Biology 21 Room D-31 

Economics 7 Room 20 

English 3 (Dr. Werner) ___ Room 31 

English 7 Room 31 

French 5 Room 32 

German 5 Room 35 

History 1 Rooms 21, 22, 25 

History 17 Room 30 

Mathematics 7 Room 26 

1:15 P. M. - 4:15 P. M. 

German 3 Room 21 

Spanish 3 Room 25 



MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 1942 
9 A. M. . 12 M. 

Chemistry 5 Room 32 

College Problems __ Rooms 21, 25, 26 

Education 13 Room 34 

French 11 Room 24 

Government 27 Room 30 

Music 1 Room 22 

1:15 P. M. - 4:15 P. M. 

Art 3 Room 31 

Chemistry 1 Rooms 21, 25 

Chemistry 9 Room D-31 

Economics 13 Room 20 

French 9 Room 24 

Psychology 3 Room 34 



English 3 (Dr. Tolles) Room 21 

English 21 Room 22 

Government 29 Room 30 

History 11 Room 31 

Mathematics 1 (Dr. Jones) 

Room 25 

Mathematics 9 , Room 35 

1:15 P. M. - 4:15 P. M. 

Education 25 Room 22 

French 1 Room 24 

German 1 Rooms 31, 32 

Sociology 11 Room 20 

Spanish 1 Rooms 21, 25 

Spanish 7 Room 26 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1942 
9 A. M. - 12 M. 

Chemistry 7 Room D-31 

Economies 5 Room 20 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1942 
9 A. M. - 12 M. 

Education 3 Room 34 

English 1 (Dr. Werner) Room 25 

Government 21 Room 21 

History of Art 1 Room 31 

Physics 3 Room D-31 

1:15 P. M. - 4:15 P. M. 

Economic Geography Room 25 

English 15 Room 21 

Intermediate Algebra Room 26 

Latin 3 Room 24 

Plane Geometry Room 20 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1942 
9 A. M. - 12 M. 

Economics 1 Room 21 

Education 23 Room 22 

English 1 (Prof. Bradley) 

Room 34 



English 1 (Dr. Tolles) Rooms 25, 

English 25 Room 

Geology 1 Room D- 

Government 23 Room 

Physics 1 Room 

1:15 P. M. - 4:15 P. M. 

Biology 1 Rooms 20, 

Education 1 Room 

Education 11 Room 

Latin 1 Room D- 

Latin 5 Room 

Sociology 1 Room 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 1942 
9 A. M. - 12 M. 

Economics 15 Room 2D 

English 11 Room 80 

English 29 Room 2i 

History 3 Room 34 

Mathematics 1 (Dr. Robinson) 

Rooms 21, 22 

Mathematics 5 Ri»mi 25 

1:15 P. M. - 4:15 P. M. 

Biology 11 Room D-2: 

English 5 Ronm 24 

French 3 Ronm 25 

History 5 Rnom 31 

History 7 Roum 34 

Mathematics 3 ;. Room 26 

Physics 5 Room D-31 



1942 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 31 
9 A. M. - 12 M. 

Biology 3 Rooms 21, 2h 

Biology 5 Room D-31 



need not be something which is local- 
ly naturally prolific. If the student 
body, the teams, and the newsmen 
take it up, the general public will fol- 
low. 

There is much in this for us all to 
think about in looking forward to 
making the proper choice. If we 
choose badly, it will be forgotten 
through disuse. If we choose well, it 
will be for all time something to asso- 
ciate with Washington College in a 
powerful way. Its representation 
will then adorn our publications, our 
banners, our jerseys; and we will be 
but the first of long generations to 
whom its appearance will signify 
something intimately connected with 
the thoughts of college days and their 
associations. 

— Gilbert W. Mead. 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
— For — 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



PROUD . . . 
READY and . . . 
EAGER TO SERVE... 
— YOU— 

%l}t H>"<rpl)te fisher 

Route 213 



Choose 

Hochschild, Kohn & Co. 

for correct 

Campus and College Wear 



*V*Vt*V%SV\>«V»«%Vl»*%XX\X?«<CW«!»<«t««»SX««»«S3tStSS» 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., JAN. 19 - 20 - 21 

"Guaranteed To Give You Twice Your 
Money's Worth." 

GARY COOPER as 

"SERGEANT YORK" 

The picture Walter Winchell and every- 
body calls "One Of The Greatest Entertain- 
ments Of All Time." 

— Admission Prices — 

For This Engagement Only 

ADULTS 55c 

CHILDREN 28c 

THUR. - FRI. - SAT., JANUARY 22-23-24 
Warner Bros. Great Comedy Hit 

"NAVY BLUES" 

— with — 

ANN SHERIDAN - JACK OAKIE 

MARTHA RAYE - JACK HALEY 

— Plus That — 

CARGO OF CUTIES 

NAVY BLUES SEXTETTE 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A complete line supplies plus all texts 
For all classes 



How to Win Friends 

in one easy lesson 
Treat yourself and others to 
wholesome, delicious Wrigley's 
Spearmint Gum. Swell to chew. 
Helps keep breath sweet, teeth 
bright. The Flavor Lasts^ 




.vsvsvS 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 


ThefJ^Elm 


• •••• 

"V" 


Jl l&JB.^^ C=~ ^ -5> JH_6Jfll. AUB. A 


••••• 






Vol. XLI. No. 16. 


WASHINGTON COLLEGE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1942 


Price Five Cents 









Faculty Group Revises Semester Schedule; 
Draft Board Lists Places Of Registration 



Collegians Will 
Register At The 
Grammer School 



Kibler Makes Announcement 
For Local Draft Board 



The Selective Service Board for 
Kent County of which Coach J. 
Thomas Kibler is chairman, announc- 
jd places of registration in Kent 
County this week for the coming reg- 
atvation on February 14 and 16. 
ft'nphirigton College students who 
must register in these dates will do so 
the Chestertown Elementary 
School West High Street. 

The registration, the third for Se- 

tive Service, will include all men 

10 have attained their 20th birthday 
n or before December 31, 1941, and 

c not attained their 45th birthday 

February 16, 1942, and who have 
not heretofore registered. 

Male students of Washington Col 
lege who will register at these dates 
ber less than fifty per cent of the 
total male enrollment. 

According to J. Raymond Simpers, 
clerk to the local board, the registra- 
places will be open from 7 A. M 
to 9 P. M. on each of the days desig- 
nated. Registrants can appear at the 
place and at a time most convenient 

Other registration places in Kent 
County are Rock Hall High School 
Millington High School, Fairlee Ele- 
mentary School, Massey Elementary 
School, Kennedyville Elementary 
School, Worton Elementary School, 
Bctterton Elementary School, and 
Piney Neck Elementary School. 

No announcement has been made 
by the Federal government as to reg- 
istration plans for men 18 and 19 
'ears of age. 



Council Issues Students Bewail 
Exam. Rules Evening Classes 
Fewer Holidays 



Council 
Guide 



Member To Act As 
Not As A Policeman 






Copies of the examination proced- 
ure were issued to all students by 
Student Government Association the 
week following the Christmas holi- 
days. The purpose of these sheets is 
stated in the opening paragraph; 

mely, "these regulations are to en- 
able you to keep your pledge under 
all circumstances." 

The sheet includes provisions for 
the monthly tests as well as the final 
examinations, but the latter is of 
more importance at this time. It is 
common knowledge that the majority 
of these sheets find their way to the 
waste basket. The general text of 
the regulation is, however, that the 
students will take alternate seats and 
will not change rooms unless with the 
approval of the instructor. No one 
is to take blue books other than those 
issued by the instructor to his place 
or any text-books not specifically al- 
lowed by the professor. The in- 
structor or a Student Council member 
will be in each room, not as "a police- 
man, but as a consultant." Anyone 
noting cheating in the examinations 
must report it to the Student Coun- 
cil. 



Condensed Curricular Pushes 

Commencement To May 25 

Term Begins Tuesday 



NQW CoilVSQS Second Semester Will Begin 

Add Up To 33 

Science, History And Education 
Among New Courses Added 



Gym Required 
Of All In '42 



Gym Classes May Be Increased 
To 5 Hours Next Year 



Greek Girls Give 
For Service Men 



Sweaters, Books, Money Are 
Among Things Given 



Since the war has come to our own 
shores, the sororities on the campus 
have been inspired to do work for na- 
tional defense. The Alpha Chis have 
recently given a card party, through 
which they made nearly forty dol- 
The profits have been sent in 
to national office as the chapters do- 
nation to the national project. It 
Was decided upon at a convention that 
the fraternity should raise money to 
equip hostels for bomb-shocked Brit- 
ish children. Among other things, 
the Alpha Chis are also saving tinsel 
and all are knitting sweaters for the 
Red Cross. 

The Zetas are knitting for the Red 
Cross and they have just turned in to 
the Red Cross seven dollars and a 
half, which was made selling chances 
on a cake. 

The Alpha Omicron Pis have just 
completed a Victory book campaign 
r Chestertown and these books are 
to be sent to the sailors and various 
army camps. These girls are also 
knitting for the Red Cross. 



The Physical Education depart- 
ment headed by Coach Kibler an- 
nounced that a few changes would 
go into effect starting next semester. 
The speeding up of scholastic work 
will automatically force the Athletic 
setup to be revised to meet the situa- 
tion. 

Starting next year, all male 
students will be required to take 
Physical Education for three hours 
a week; this may be changed to five 
at a later date. The only ones to b« 
exempt from this will be those who 
participate in a varsity sport and sen- 
iors. Coach Kibler explained that, 
"we need to be physically fit and I'm 
going to do everything in my power 
to see that this is done." 

Since the Scholastic work is being 
speeded up. it will mean that the base 
ball team will be the first to suffei 
by it. The schedule will have to be 
revised and shortened two full weeks 
As far as other sports are concerned 
changes will be made according to the 
situation. 

The gym classes will be more rigid 
with emphasis being placed on body 
building exercises. There will be an 
attempt to have all male students 
take gym at precisely the same hour 
but this is only in the tentative stage. 
There is still time to enroll in the 
special boxing and wrestling classes 
being conducted under the supervision 
of Coach Ekaitis. 



Evening classes, a thing never con- 
sidered by the students here, have 
been initiated into the Washington 
College curricular for next semester, 
according to Dr. Mead. 

Since the second semester is being 
shortened by one week, it has been 
necessary to fit that work into the 
schedule in some way. Dr. Mead 
said that it had not yet been decided 
as to whether all of the classes would 
be held in the evening or three-fifteen 
classes would be conducted. 

However many classes the course is 
held a week, that number must be 
made up during the term. According 
to the letter posted by Dr. Mead on 
the bulletin board, mid-semester ex- 
aminations will be held next term, 
doing away with the monthly blue- 
books. With this plan more yellow- 
sheets will be given by the professors, 
in all probability, according to Dr. 
Mead. 

The calendar for the next semester 
has been condensed not only by the 
elimination of one week of classes but 
also by the shortening of the holv 
days. Rather than the two days us- 
ually given between semesters, only 
one will be allowed this year; Spring 
vacation has been cut altogether and 
replaced with three days at Easter,- 
Good Friday, Saturday, and Easter 
Sunday. With this plan commence- 
ment will be held on the twenty-fifth 
of May. 

oo 



Sport Cards Cut 
After May 9th 

All spring sports scheduled after 
May 9 will be dropped according to 
an announcement from the Athletic 
Department yesterday. In additi 
the complete tennis schedule will be 
dropped. These decisions were made 
at a meeting of the Athletic Board 
Wednesday. Coach Tom Kibler pre- 
sided. 

This action was carried out upon 
the recommendation of the Admini- 
stration. With the new Commence 
ment date of May 25, of necessity, the 
examination scheduled has been ad 
vanced to the Middle of May. Ath 
letic contests during or after this 
time would be impossible. 



Three courses — one English, one 
physics and a hygiene course — will be 
accelerated next semester, according 
to information from the registrar's 
office. 

In addition, thirty-three new cours- 

, which were not given last semes- 
ter, will be offered next term. Of 
these latter, only three are science 
courses, and four mathematics, the 
large majority being history, govern- 

;nt and education subjects. 

Contemporary Literature, given by 
Dr. Warner, will be increased from a 
two-to-three-hour course, and will 
continue as such regularly. Applied 
Electricity, under Dr. Coop, has been 
evised, and two double laboratory 
periods a week will be held instead 
of one, if enough students want the 
course. Hygiene, which will be 
taught by Dr. Kline, will be a two- 
hour course rather than a one-hour 
one, as formerly. 

Dr. Corrington will offer a -one- 
hour course in entomology or herpet- 
ology, depending upon which is de- 
manded, and also a four-hour course 
n Laboratory Technique. 

In the economics department, new 
courses are Money and Banking, 
Transportation, Advertising, and Sta- 
tistics. 

Five new courses will be offered in 
the education department: Principles 
of Sedondary School Teaching, The 
High School, Education Measure- 
ment, Extra-Curricular Activities in 
the High School, and Teaching Sci- 
ence. 

Only two different language cours- 
es are being offered: Civilization and 
Culture of the French Nation and 
German Conversation and Composi- 
tion. 



On Tuesday, February 3 
Under New Plans 

Emergency Committee Saves 
Two Weeks On Revised Cal- 
endar And Extra Classes 



In line with the general prac- 
tice which has developed in 
colleges and universities to- 
ward an acceleration of the col- 
lege year and an ultimate short- 
ening of the college course for 
those who require such an ac- 
celeration, the Emergency 
Committee of the Washington 
College Faculty has drawn up 
a revised schedule for the com- 
ing semester which opens on 
February 3. 

By the shortening of holidays and 
a concentration of work throughout 
the semester, College students will 
save, approximately, two weeks from 
their academic schedule this spring 
advancing the date of graduation of 
the present senior class to Monday, 
May 25. This will make possible the 
earlier entrance into summer jobs of 
those who expect to work and will 
provide a vacation of, approximately, 
four weeks before the opening of the 
majority of the summer sessions held 
in this part of the country. 

The College has not yet announced 
its plans for a possible summer ses- 
sion. The generally accepted pro- 
gram of acceleration advises attend- 



400 Books Given 
For Men In Army 

200 People Attend Book Tea 
Held In Bunting Library 



College Clocks Will Be 

Moved Up An Hoar Feb. 9 



Dr. Mead announced this week that 
the College would set up its clocks one 
hour beginning Sunday night, Febru- 
ary 9, in accordance with the day- 
light-saving time legislation signed by 
the President on January 20. The 
nation will go on daylight-saving time 
at 2 A. M., E. S. T., Monday, Febru- J Connors, Virginia Cooper, Ellen Pet 
ary 9. | ers and Laura Rainey. 



The "Victory Book Tea" held in 
Bunting Library on Tuesday after- 
noon was very successful. This tea 
was given by the library staff and the 
board of the Chestertown library for 
the Victory book campaign. The 
books, and they number 400, will be 
sent to sailors and army camps all 
over the country. One hundred of 
these books were contributed by 
Rock Hall. It is estimated that 
about 200 people attended the tea. 

Mrs. Gilbert Mead and Miss Steu- 
art poured for the tea, and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Jones was chairman. Serving 
wgre: Minor Steele, Margaret Ann 
Dukes, Louise Hammond, Eleanor 
White, Grace Stouffer, Eleanor Har- 
nishfeger, Betty Nash, Dorothy Riedy, 
Dian Hubbard, Gretchen Smith, Joan 



The calendar for the second 
semester at Washington College 
will be as follows: 

February 3 — -Tuesday Class- 
es begin. 

February 21 — Saturday, 
Washington's Birthday Holi- 
day. 

March 26 - April 2 — Mid- 
Semester "Blue Books." 

April 2 — Thursday, 5:00 P. 
M., Easter Holiday begins. 

April 6 — Monday, 8:00 A. 
M., Classes resume. 

May 18-22 — Final exam- 
inations. 

May 24 Baccalaureate. 

May 25 — Monday, Com- 
mencement. 



ance of a student at a 12 weeks sum- 
mer course running from the third 
week in June to the third week in 
September where it is immediately 
followed by the fall semester. 

One week has been saved by the 
shortening of vacations and a concen- 
trating of the examination period. 
The work of the other week will be 
covered by an arrangement schedul- 
ing the necessary extra periods at in- 
tervals during the semester. 

It is recommended that, instead of 
monthly "blue books", the Faculty 
give but one "blue book" in each 
course, that to be during the week 
marking the middle of the semester. 
A more frequent scheduling of "yel- 
low sheets" will be expected than is 
now the custom of some departments. 



PACE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 



194; 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor i Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



Member 

Associated GoUe6iate Press 

Distributor of 

GoiIe6ideDi6est 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 



Co/Use PubUiba 
420 Madison Ave. 
chicago * 80etob ■ los 



RepreiertUtliit 
New York. N. Y. 

his * srni Fnineisco 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1942 



The ELM Is Calling Yoa 



.0? what ?«TTy 
r 7, (3iW5 ~m*£ 

THINK TLL lt , 

ASK eoi"ro(>-^°« e > 

_-£ 3>B oft 




7 



e^sfe' 



The Best Team In The State 

Although the Shoremen, Dutchmen, Dumb-Shots, Maroons, 
whatever they may be called, have lost their only three league 
games played, they still deserve the complete support of the 
fans. Although they were definitely the "underdogs" in the 
Baltimore U. game, they took the bit in their teeth and played 
the one time best team in Maryland to a standstill. Washing- 
ton College has the best basketball team in the state now, de- 
spite records. 

Despite examinations, had you seen "the boys" play their 
hearts out against Baltimore University, you would do your part 
.o cheer them on against Western Maryland here tomorrow 
night. Each of the five players was outstanding. Benjamin 
snared five consecutive rebounds. It seemed impossible for 
Pamele to miss an outside shot. Gibe's guarding was the best. 
The feeding and passing of McNiff and Stevens would make any 
coach envious of "Dutch" Dumschott. 

"Dutch" and the boys deserve your support. Come out 
and cheer as they beat Western Maryland tomorrow night. 



Freshmen Men — .75 Or Bast! 

As the first semester draws to a close both the fraternities 
and the freshmen are looking forward to pledge week. As us- 
ual, there are a number of freshmen interested in fraternities 
who have low scholastic ratings. Many of them are considered 
fine material by the fraternities. 

It will be necessary, however, for these boys to make at 
least a .75 index to be pledged to a fraternity. And in order to 
be initiated into active membership a 1.00 index is required 
These facts should be carefully considered by freshmen inter- 
ested in fraternities when they prepare for their final examina- 
tions: After the first semester the job of getting an index gets 
harder and harder, so "hit the books" now. 



Don't Cheat Yourself 

Each year as the time for examinations rolls around, the 
Student Council distributes copies of the Examination Proced 
ure to all students. Most of us consider them a waste of paper, 
and practice our basketball shots by throwing them at the waste 
paper basket. 

No doubt, all upperclassmen feel that they know the rules 
by route, but if they were to reread them, they would probably 
find one or two points they had forgotten. "These regulations 
are to enable you to keep your pledge under all circumstances." 
This should make us all fee! that the Student Council and facul- 
ty are trying to help rather than police us; yet every year some 
few balk and think it smart to "cheat right under the Prof.'s 
nose." Really very little is gained by cribbing, — the principal 
one being that you lose people's respect and make them angry 
when you pull their marks down. None of us is old enough to 
be truly tolerant. We will agree that by cheating in exams 
you are only cheating yourself, but we can't realize the truth of 
this enough to pity rather than scorn the cribber. 

The idealistic dream of all college professors is a student 
body devoid of cribbers, but a few never seem able to accept the 
responsibility of the Honor System. 

Moral? Why cheat; it only casts reflection on your fam- 
ily and makes everyone dislike you ! 



In cooperation with the Faculty Committee on Student 
Activities to reduce extra-curricular activities to a minimum, the 
ELM is calling for 15 volunteers to its staff. By enlarging the 
staff, the same amount of work may be spread over a greater 
service, thus causing less work for all. * 

Students from all classes will be accepted. There is a 
special need for sports, feature, and editorial writers. No ex- 
perience is necessary. If you wish to join, please communicate 
with the editor of the ELM immediately. 



Where 
Were You? 



Chuck Nairn To Head Y. M. C. A. 



The Council had an old problem on 
its hands this week. But it was new 
this year. Ask Irma and Sally what 
the little notices that they got said 
. , . The library evidently is not in- 
clusive to good English. Frank says 
that "Think is a mirage." . . . Donald 
Pletts requires his carrot a day, and 
finds that other people like the car- 
rots as much as he does . . . Bill Ben- 
nett had a hard time at the Delaware 
game trying to find the gym. Finally 
had to ask if they had a college at 
Newark. And by the way, Rufe is 
mighty handy in a fight, as he creates 
quite a breeze leaving. 

Laura and Sally had a very de- 
lightful Sunday evening . . . Pickles 
knew that he was riding for a fall but 
it was worse than he expected. Also 
had to break down and buy a pack of 
cigarettes, his first since Christmas 
. . . The faculty has discussed the 
possibility of a summer session but 
the final results are still pending , . . 
Calvert is making no bones about the 
fact that he is on the loose again. No 
holds barred ... J. V. Brutz wants a 
date with Hedy Lamaar or someone 
just like her. Any applications? . . . 
Mac, during a moment of profound 
reflection, states that we should knit 
one and Pearl Harbor. 

Pete is getting rather hot under the 
collar. Don't worry, they were only 
talking about school work . . . Much 
to the astonishment of all, Lucilla 
was room-campused this week, and 
what's more, we hear ((reliable 
source) that she can be quoted 
saying "damn." Teh! Teh. . 
Another point of interest is that the 
b'hoys are settling down to the good 
old-fashioned rushing again . . . Dr. 
Tolles, when asked what he was doing 
Friday night, thought that he was be- 
ing approached for a date. Just 
another ticket campaign. 



Examinations Bring 

Cramming And Gabbing 



Scattered Notes And Unmade 
Beds Add To Disorder 



Charles B. Nairn was elected as 
President of the YMCA at the weekly 
meeting. To assist him will be Elroy 
Boyer, as vice-president, Jack Smith 
as secretary, and Harry Roe as treas- 
urer. 

Pete Shannaman was elected as 
librarian and Braach Warfield as ser- 
geant-at-arnis. The organization 



voted to send two delegates to the 
Student Christian Annual Conference 
to be held in Washington on Febru- 
ary 5 and 6. Chuck Nairn and Harry 
Roe were selected as the delegates 
with Jack Smith as alternate. A de 
eision on the "Y" banquet was with- 
held until the next meeting. 



Document Is Submitted 



At a special meeting, Wednesday, 
January 21, the Historical Society 
adopted a new constitution. The do- 
cument was drawn up by President 
Calvert Jones and will be submitted 
to tbe Student Council for approval. 



Just as sure as time itself the hour 
is drawing nearer. That eventful 
day is coming! Last minute prepara- 
tions are being made under the mid- 
night oil. Bleary eyes search out 
each illusive fact. Scattered notes 
are gathered and rewritten, and hast- 
ily last books are read for reports. 
But it is no use, even now the Angel 
is writing in the book. 

Cram sessions, scholastic gab- 
feasts, midnight oil burning — all 
these come to haunt us. Tiny voices 
whisper as you lay down your weary 
head in the early morning. Formu- 
las, history dates, novel characters all 
rise up to haunt us. David Copper- 
field and George Washington shake 
their finger and laugh. 

Stumbling excursions to Bennetts, 
black coffee, aspirin, and No — Doz. 
Smoke filled rooms, littered desks and 
scattered notes. Coke cups over- 
flowing the waste can onto the al- 
ready littered floor. Full ash trays 
crumpled papers all heaped in profus- 
ion. 

Unmade bed-clothes in a pile — 
shoes dropped hurriedly anywhere on 
the floor add to the confusion. Lost 
notebooks, borrowed text-books, worn 
down pencils, chewed erasers, empty 
fountain pens, only aid in exaspera- 
tion. 

Last minute glances at notes, wor- 
ried expressions, packs of cigarettes, 
well-sharpened pencils and off we go 
reciting tables — glances around to see 
the professor last minute assurances 
from worried acquaintances. Sweat- 
ing hands — rumpled hair — hours of 
tenseness, curses and self reproach 
At last its over and on to the next 
one. 

Where's that guy who said school- 
days are the happiest. He must nev- 
er have taken an exam. 



Alumni Dance Off 



The Executive Committee of the 
Baltimore Chapter of the Washington 
College Alumni decided not to have a 
dance following the Loyola game this 
year as has been the custom for thc- 
past several years. Usually a num- 
ber of students attend after seeing 
the game. The strenuous times wa: 
the reason given by the Committee 
for not having it. 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



NOTICE TO 
BALTIMORE U. 

Quoted from last week's "Editor", 
Desk": "The Baltimore U. BALOO i, 
running editorials to persuade tho a& 
ministration of that school to huy (h, 
old Goucher Buildings. Pi'ihap* 
they can get a basketball team fron 
Goucher, too." After Wednesday 
night's game, we certainly won't tsq 
that back. The boys really looVe/ 

good and from now on the sc ;n 

going to show it. A gardenia shouh 
go to lanky Bill Benjamin. Fi 
times consecutively we saw him sniin 
the ball from the backboard. W» 
could spend our whole column tctting 
how good each of the boys was. 

Speaking of the Baltimore 
game reminds us of the fracw 
that almost happened. Oberhaui 
of Baltimore went down on the 
hardwood with Gibe. Both came 
up swinging. No tempers were 
lost. It was just the excitement 
of the game. It certainly didn't 
take the stands long to get to 
the floor nor did it take the reffi 
and the cops long to straighten 
the boys out. Both continued 
the game. "Dutch" only used 
two subs — Voith and Ruff, Both 
gave good accounts of them- 
selves. 

Among the boys of yesteryears 01 
er to the game were Wils Sheurhol 
and Mike Kardash. Both are marriej 
now and from the weight they kv 
gained, it looks like married life 
agreeing with them. Chuck Collin 
was at the game too. To mentio 
all the Washington grads there wout 
take a lot of space but we could te 
they were interested in the 
from the yelling they were doing. W 
imagine it helped the boys a lot. 
cidentally, Big Jim Stevens got on 
of those foul shots in the end of tl 
game and, believe it or not — he mad 
it. 

FOR THE BENEFIT 
OF A FEW 

For the benefit of a few people wb 
neither read the bulletin board n« 
go to assembly, the ELM is printin 
stories of the latest development 
from the Administrative Offices, 
course, printing this is also an 
vantage to our readers outside 
College. We, who have gotten 
nickname of "Scoop" because we nil 
er can get one. are still hoping thJ 
something will happen on a Fri 
morning and we can put it in the pal 
er before its gets on either the bolll 
tin board or in the assembly. An] 
way, the ELM still gets the first rigH 
to the examination schedule. 

Under this same head come' 
this advice about examination!. 
There are several things to re- 
member at this particular time 
of year. Especially the Freib- 
men boys should try doubly hard 
to get those indexes. The Inter- 
Fraternity Council has a strange 
rule that the frats can't pledge* 
Frosh who hasn't a .75 ind«- 
Every year thts cuts out m» B * 
boys. Don't let it happen to 
you. About two years, ■'"' 
mid-years, several of the beam- 
ing faces were missing from «" 
campus — and not because the* 
flunked out or quit. The Stu- 
dent Council had stepped '»• 
The Council has a printed sheet 
of rules to follow when taki°I 
exams. Best to follow them. 
Beginning a week from this to 
ing Monday, time will set back 1 
hour and Washington students 
get up an hour earlier and go t0 , 
an hour earlier — except they *'" 
if you know what we mean. 1* 
(Continued on Page 4) 



I. 



i ! 



Sport Tlse^SS^Iim Section 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM CHESTERTOWN, MD, 



PAGE THREE 



Kardash's 
Corner 



Coach Fred Dumsehott, in a vain 
endeavor to chalk up a league win, 
das changed the Sho' cagers style of 
p|ay. He plans to utilize a "bucket 
miin" with the two forwards cutting 
shmi'ly from both sides. The guards 
who will remain just inside the cen- 
ter line, will feed the ball to the piv- 
olman. Whether this strategy will 
work remains to he seen, but, it most 
certainly won't make matters worse. 

In the last three games, the Sho'- 
nitii have played a sloppy brand of 
basketball. Their passing has been 
tic, and the shooting and floor 
work has been faulty. Particularly, 
Ihe inability to drop foul shots has 
the maroons chances of victory. 
In fact, against Maryland and Mt. St. 
Mnry's, the maroons passed in a mere 
J foul shots out of 25 free tosses. Not 
mowing when to shoot, also, has cost 
lie locals many scoring chances, cs- 
illy in the Maryland game. And 
finally, the Sho'men have definitely to 

uain a winning spirit and a deter- 
mination to fight. 

Loyola's Greyhounds are riding 

gh these days, having a record of 6 

ins and no_losses, The Greyhounds 
liave trounced nearly all its foes, ex- 
cepting Western Maryland, whom 
they barely subdued in an overtime 
period 39-38. Maybe, the layoff dur- 
ing the next two weeks will cool the 
Greyhounds considerably, who, just 
now, are red hot. At least, that's 
; the other Mason-Dixon quints 
hope, particularly the Sho'men who 
face Lefty Reitz's powerful five for 
the first time on February 7. 

Western Maryland, according to all 
reports, is even stronger than last 
year. That's hard to believe, be- 
cause the Green and Gold cagers cop- 
ped the league honors with a surpris- 
ing upset of Loyola. In Irv Biasi, 
Kaplan and Ed Mogowski, the Terps 
possess three capable players. Biasi, 
fast and shifty, is also always a scor- 
ing; threat and Mogowski, sophomore 
star, is among the leaders in the 
State scoring race. The Sho'men 
will have quite a task toppling the 
Terps on Saturday night, January 24, 
in a home game. 

Maryland has two fine players in 
Dnn Sheurholz and Ernie Travis, 
both who mainly accounted for their 
team's victory over the locals. Dun 
Sheurholz, brother of Wilson, former 
ex-Washington College star court per- 
former and three-letter man, is not 
quite as adept as his brother at the 
game, but he still has two more years 
of college competition. Don is the 
key man in the Terrapin attack, his 
hall-handling and rapid-fire passing 
set up most of the Terp plays. Ernie 
Travis, tall Terrapin center, handles 
himself very well and his scoring abil- 
ity was demonstrated in the final per- 
iod of Maroon contest. In less than 
five minutes, he had amassed a total 
of 7 points, which sparked the Terra- 
Pins to come from behind and nose 
out the hapless Maroons. 

The Sho'men, in order to compete 
in the Mason-Dixon playoffs, will cer- 
tainly have to snap out of its dol- 
drums. Whether the last trio of 
(fames have been the reasons for this 
slump is hard to tell. But, more 
significant, is the fact, that they h: 
( o face the first three teams of the 
league during the second half. Loy- 
ola, Western Maryland, and Catholic 
^ ., are yet to be played, and Sh> 
fans aren't contemplating too much 
success for the locals. 



Shoremen Tie Bees, 41-41 In Second Tilt; 
Engage W. Md. At Armory On Saturday 



The Shoremen broke their losing 
streak Wednesday night when they 
tied a strong Baltimore U. quint 
41-41 in a most unusual game. Wash- 
ington lead the Bees 20-13 at half- 
time and maintained this lead until 
the last minutes of the play. This 
game will give the locals more confi- 
dence when they meet Western Mary- 
land here tomorrow night. The Ter- 
rors are members of the Mason-Dixon 
League. 

Storekeeper Errs 

With a minute to play, the Shore- 
men were ahead 40-38. Here, the 
scoreUeeper stopped the game and 
changed the scoreboard to 40-39. 
stating that this was the official score. 
After this, each team dropped in a 
f i :e i throw making the score 41-40, 
still in favor of the Sho'men. A sec- 
ond later, the Bees scored a field go_al 
putting them ahead 42-41 when the 
final whistle blew. 

The crowd left and the teams dress- 
ed, all believing the Bees had won. 
Newsmen, getting the lineups for the 
morning papers, discovered the error 
and the official score was changed to 
a 41-41 tie. With both teams dress- 
ed, it was impossible to play an extra 
period. 

Samele High Scorer 

Frank Samele, one of Ijhe league's 
highest scorers, was high scorer for 
Washington with 16. Winitski was 
high scorer for the Bees with 11. 
Washington's lineup included Samele, 
Stevens, Benjamin, McNiff, and Gibe. 
Voith and Ruff were substitutes. 



Among State's Scoring Leaders 




INTRA - MURAL BASKETBALL 
STANDINGS 
JANUARY 20 

Fraternity League 

W L Pc. 

Kappa Alpha 8 3 .727 

Lambda Chi 8 3 .727 

Theta Chi 5 4 .555 

Day Students 3 8 .272 

Class League 

Freshmen 9 1 .900 

Sophomores 8 2 .800 

Seniors 1 8 5 .615 

Juniors 1 10 .090 

Hall League 

West Hall 5 5 .500 

Middle Hall 4 7 .363 

East Hall 3 6 .333 

Cain Hall 2 8 .200 



MAROON'S RECORD TO DATE 



Washington 
Washington 
Washington 
Washington 
Washington 
Washington 
Washington 
Washington 
Washington 

Totals 



56 — Salisbury 
33 — LaSalle 
31 — Moravian 
22 — Villanova 
40 — Baltimore U. 
3 — Delaware 
42 — Hopkins 
25 — Maryland 
41 — Mounts 

32Q ' : 



The day is always his who works in 
it with sincerity and great aims. 
Emerson. 



A. S. TURNER & SONS 

The Firestone Store 

—SPORTING GOODS — 

Tennis Racquets, Tennis Balls, Footballs, Basketballs, 

Flashlight Batteries, Electric Light Bulbs 

FILL UP WITH GOOD GULF GASOLINE HERE 

High Street 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., JAN. 26-27-28 

The Grand And Glorious Hit That The 
Whole World Loves. 

"ONE FOOT IN HEAVEN" 

— with — 

FREDRIC MARCH - MARTHA SCOTT 

The book was swell but the picture tops 

it by miles. The story of a man who had 

"One Foot In Heaven" and the other one in 

Hot Water. 



THUR. - FRI. - SAT., JANUARY 29-30-31 
BIG DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

"INTERNATIONAL SQUADRON" 

— with — 
RONALD REGAN 
The first big story of the RAF's "Foreign 
Legion." 

_PI US _ 

A New Western Feature Thriller 

CHARLES STARRETT 

— in — 

"THE MEDICO OF PAINTED SPRINGS" 




Charles Dimmling & Co. 

Quality Meats and Poultry 

Stores and Institutions 

Supplied 



"We are : 
When it c 



>t afraid to boast 
mes to tender roast" 



602 S. Broadway, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Choose 

Hochschild, Kohn & Co, 

for correct 

Campus and College Wear 




Have fun -be friendly 

Treat yourself and 

others to fresh-tasting 

Wrigley's Spearmint Gum 

The Flavor Lasts 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 



1943 



With The 



Greeks 



Alpha Chi Omega 

Peggy Wolcott, '44, accepted a bid 
from Alpha Chi Omega yesterday. 

Over thirty dollars was made 
through the card party which the sor- 
ority held last Friday night. The 
money will be sent as the group's do- 
nation to its national project, — 
equipping hostels for British bomb- 
shocked children and the American 
Red Cross. 



Zcta Tail Alpha 

Ruth Smith, '43, was initiated into 
Zeta Tau Alpha yesterday after- 
noon. 



Kappa Alpha 

Charlie Fetter, '41, returned to the 
campus last week before leaving for 
Alabama as an Army aviation cadet. 
He entertained the fraternity and a 
few friends Thursday night at Gills. 



Lambda Chi Alpha 
The members of the fraternity team 
journeyed to Drexel Institute over 
the week-end of January 10-11. Play- 
ing a good brand of ball they defeat- 
ed the Lambda Chi team by a score 
of 32-12. Later a buffet supper and 
house dance was enjoyed by all. 

Basil C. Clark has been accepted 
in the Class V-7, United States Nav- 
al Reserve. After graduation he will 
nttend a Midshipman School either on 
(lie Prairie State in New York or at 
Northwestern U. 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



BAR 


N E 


T T ' 


S 


BARB 


E R 


SHOP 


lESPUpstairs 


Opposite 


Court 


House 









PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



"History Of The Crises" Series 
To Be Presented By Historians 



As their part in national defense, 
the College Historical Society has 
dopted a plan to promote a series of 
lectures by college authorities on the 
various phases of the "History of the 
Crises." The program will begin in 
February. The general public will 
be urged to attend. 



A Statement Of Editorial 
Policy 

Because of much public dis- 
cussion, it has become neces- 
sary to issue a statement of 
editorial policy concerning the 
column "With The Greeks." 
Since Greek news is not written 
by ELM reporters but by mem- 
bers of the respective organiza- 
tions, this news will be publish- 
ed as and when it is received, 
in so far as is possible. 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builders 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campus Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



(Continued from Page 2) 
dark enough at seven one day this 
week. If we have to get up an hour 
earlier, it seems as though flashlights 
will be needed to find Hodson Hall. 
We sincerely hope everyone appreci- 
ates the fact that there are no un- 
necessary pictures in this week's 
ELM. We heard a lot of discussion 
about it last week and we agree that 
it was justified. Enough of this chat- 
ter. So long and thirty. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



See 

OTIS 

For The HAIRCUT 



Read tho ELM 



MACK'S 

RADIO 

SHOP 
Kent News Building 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration" 
Phone 48 



Meet Your Class Mates 

— at— 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



PITTSBURGH PAINTS 

"Smooth As Glass'* 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass 
Company 

Baltimore, Maryland 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

Service 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 



WILLIAM'S 
Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Phone 132W 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



WONG LEE 

CHINESE 

LAUNDRY 

317 Cannon St. 

Chestertown, Md. 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 



phone 14 



Did You Know 

That Hutzler's Gives 

In-Town Service To 

Out-of-Town Customers? 

Write and try the efficient 
shopping service of 

HUTZLER BPQTHER5 € 

Baltimore, Md. 



Gill's 

Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 



T 
Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

A 



"THE HOUSE OF HITS" 

CHURCHILL 

Two Show. Every Night, 7 and 9 P. M. — Matinee Every Saturda, 

SAT., MON., TUES., WED., JANUARY 24, 26, 27, 28 

"I've Never Really Wanted Any- 
thing I didn't/Get— Somehow!" 



i 



The story of a 
who feared no one . 
but herself . . . who 
knew no love but the 
lust for power! A 
role that brings you 
the REAL Bette Davis 
... at her greatest! 




1 'Samuel Goldwyn 

,' ■■'■ \ .,- ' presents^ " ■' - 

BlTTE DAVIS 

LittleFoxes 



tTERESA WRIGHT ^ RICHAfiD CARLSON 



From the Broadway Success by 

LILLIAN HELLMAN 

Directed by WILLIAM WYLER 

Diitributad fey RKO Radio Pidur«i 



THURSDAY - FRIDAY, 



JANUARY 29 - 30 







WrmF^W 




Lupe'a on the 
Loose Again 
. , and Leon's in His 
Second Childhood 

. . as "Fiii" from France 
arrives to brighten up theii 
slap-happy home-Frenchy, 
frisky, tuniul f. 



CHARLES "Buddy" ROGErVzASU PITTS 



ProdiK-d by CLIFF REID • Directed by LESLIE GOODWINS 

Orioinal Screen Play by Jerry Cady and Charle* E- Rober" 



DON'T FORGET 

'REMEMBER THE DAY" 



Instructors Vote Unanimously 
For Addition Of Semester Here 




Vol. XLI. No. 17. 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1942 



Price Five Cents 



Fraternity Presidents To Issue Bids Soon 




Dave Bartolini 



Kappa Alpha 

Established at Washington Col- 
!ge, 1936. 

Initiation Fee, $45.00; Pledge 
lues, $0.75 per month; Active Dues, 
.00 per month. 

President, David Bartolini; Vice- 
resident, Philip Souder; Secretary, 
tufus Johnson. 

Class of 1942; David Bartolini, E. 
Ibert Dudderar, Wilburt T. Patter- 
on, A. Rayfield Kirby, Philip B. Sou- 
ler, J. Calvert Jones, Jr., Rufus C. 
ohnson, William W. Paca, John Kar- 
ash. 

Class of 1942: Edwin R. Boyer, J. 
iGonard Parris, Harold O. Martin, 
r.. Walter Clark Brandt, S. Omar 
aekson, Jr., Peter J. DePalma. 

Class of 1944: Norman E. Sharper, 
ames N. Juliana, Herbert J. Mor- 
!an, Jr., Judson T. Williams, Jr., 

auk Macielag. 




68 Per Cent Of Students 
Would Probably Attend 



Pan-Hell Council 
Selects Orchestra 



Lew Lortz Features Goodman, 
And Dorsey Arrangements 



Lambda Chi 

Established at Washington College 
from the local Phi Sigma Tau in 1937. 

Expenses: Pledge Fee, $1.00; Ini- 
tiation, $40.00; Yearly Dues, $20.00. 

Local Officers: High Alpha, Basil 
C. Clark; High Beta, Donald W. 
Smith; High Gamma, Charles B. 
Nairn. 

\ Class of 1942: Lawrence S. Bricc, 
Robert E. Carter, Basil C. Clark, Rob- 
ert N. Corley, Robert K. Crane, 
; Thomas W. Eliason, Mortimer Garri- 
son, John A. Harris, Atlee C. Kepler, 
Oliver W. Littleton, Henry F. Mc- 
guire, William M. Nagler, Donald W 
Smith, John W. Smith. 

Class of 1S43: Michael A. Alteri, J 
Calvin Carney, Andrew R. Gorman, 
[Austin R. Murphy, Charles B. Nairn ; 
Francis Taylor. 

Class of 1944: Theodore Kuvze 
Rudolph M. Parks, Charles E. Rother- 
mel, Robert A. Ruff, John R. Smith 
M. Gaylord Steele. 



Lloyd Davis 



Theta Chi 

Established at Washington Col- 
lege, 1940. 

President, Lloyd Davis; Vice-Pres- 
ident, James Diacumakos; Secretary, 
Elroy Boyer. 

Expenses: Pledge Fee, $5.00; Ini- 
tiation Fee, $40.00; Yearly Dues, 
$30.00. 

Class of 1942-: Lloyd Davis, Harry 
Lore, James Diacumakos, Ernest 
Larrimore, Edgar Wood, Francis 
Mead. 

Class of 1943: Albert Mooney, Nel- 
son Kaylor, Southey Miles, Harry 
Slade, Elroy Boyer, Paul Ruark, Mar- 
tin Warther, William Roe. 

Class of 1944: Harry Roe, Frank 
Gibe, D. Gilbert Conant, Jr., Gene 
Johnson, James Metcalfe, Frank Ev- 
ans. 



Six New Students 
Enroll This Term 



Four Registrants Are Balti- 
more an s: Two Transfers 



Six students have registered this 
peek in Dr. Howell's office as fresh 
Four of them are from Balti- 
tooi'e, one from Brooklyn, and one 
rom Church Hill. 

Of the four from Baltimore, three 
'f them graduated from City College 
u $t this week, the fourth having 
rarisferred from Franklin and Mar- 
jiall where he took his first semes^ 
;er 's work. 

Uurence T. Gwyn, J. William Lew- 
's, and Fred W. Schroeter are the 
City College graduates; the other Bal- 
'fiore man is Blanchard D. Carney, 

Murray Natanson is the student 
:r °m Brooklyn; he studied at Brook- 
1") College during the first semester 



where he took preparatory and col- 
lege courses. 

The sixth registrant, W. Edwin 
Crouch, from Church Hill, is a trans- 
fer from Western Maryland College, 
where he completed a semester's work. 



Miss Mattie Gives 
Extra For Studes 



Girls Oust Men 
As Cage Kef s 

The boys have been ousted as um- 
pires at the girls' basketball games. 
The Board of Managers decided at 
its regular meeting that girls taking 
Educational 12 should have the prac- 
tical experience. 

It was decided, too, that because of 
the condensed program the schedule 
should be cut. Instead of a second 
round of games, only those winning 
the greater number of games will 
play off for the championship. 

Candy will be sold by the Board at 
the games. 



The Pan-hellenic Council is import- 
ing Lew Lortz and his thirteen piece 
jrchestra from Baltimore for their an- 
nual inter-sorority dance March 7. 
This band is very popular in Balti- 
more and has played at proms at 
Western Maryland and University of 
Maryland. 

The orchestra is comparatively 
new. Its personel being drawn from 
other Baltimore orchestras. The out- 
standing men in the band are Dewitt 
Finster, considered one of Baltimore's 
best trumpet players, Frank Michetti, 
tenor sax player, Al Exler, featured 
alto sax, and Peper Asner, the drum- 
mer, who recently joined the band af- 
ter playing a theatre circuit on the 
coast for the past two years. Ginger 
Rhodes is their promising young vo- 
calist. 

Lew Lortz and his orchestra will 
suit everybody's taste for he is known 
for his "sweet and swing" arrange 
ments. His arrangements are based 
on those of Jimmie Lunsford, Jimmy 
Dorsey, Benny Goodman, Charlie 
Barnet, and Tommy Dorsey. besides 
original arrangements by his own ar 
ranger, A. D. Mueller, whose song 
"I'll Be With You Where You Are 1 
is the band's theme. 



Washington Men 
Enlist In Service 

Navy Public Relations Board 
Announces Enlistments 



Board Of Governors Must Give 

Final Decision On Issue; 

Expected To Okay Plan 



Summer school will, in all proba- 
bility, be held at Washington College 
beginning this year. The Faculty 
approved of the plan unanimously at 
the meeting held Monday night, and 
it will be presented to the Board of 
Visitors and Governors when it con- 
venes sometime during the latter part 
of this month. 

According to the student poll taken 
here last week through form letters, 
68 per cent of the student body said 
they would possibly, or very probably 
enroll if such a term were instituted. 
The faculty has expressed its willing- 
ness "to serve this extra duty with- 
out added compensation if ,the neces- 
sity is evident financially. 

Board Expected To Approve 

The Board of Visitors and Gover- 
nors is expected to pass the measure 
at its next meeting which will prob- 
ably be held about the end of this 
month. Whether the Board will hold 
a special meeting to discuss the issue 
has not been decided. Since the stu- 
dent poll's testamony of the support 
the summer session would receive, and 
since the faculty has expressed its 
willingness to cut the costs as far as 
possible for the student, the measure 
will, in all probability, be passed by 
the Board. 

One Plan Suggested 

One plan that has been suggested 
is to hold two six-weeks sessions. This 
would allow the student to complete 
a year's course in one summer. How- 
ever, the question must meet with the 
approval of the Board of Visitors and 
Governors before any definite plans 
can be made. 



One Of Few Schools To Issue 
Duplicate Mark Records 

It is strongly indicated that fresh- 
men will be admitted to summer 
school, although nothing final will be 
known until the board's meeting this 
month, was the statement by Dr. 
Howell. 

Duplicate copies have been made 
of each student's marks, so that both 
the student and his parenis receive 
the fatal news at the earliest possible 
moment. This is quite a service to 
the students that Miss Mattie is per- 
forming, and is not done at numerous 
other colleges, where marks are sent 
to either the parents or to the stir 
dents, but not to both. 



The Navy has accepted ten of the 
graduates and former students of 
Washington College since the new 
speed-up program has been put into 
effect. 

The training schools at the USS 
Prairie State, at Northwestern Uni- 
versity, and at Annapolis have grad- 
uated eight former students. On 
January 16, H. C. (Cottie) Coleman, 
Jr., and Bill Shrewsbury were given 
commissions after having been grad- 
uated from the course at The Prairie 
State, while George Erety Grieb re- 
ceived his upon graduation from the 
unit at Northwestern University. Oth- 
ers who had already received their 
commissions are Harry Hicks, Phil 
Hickman, Eddie Buck, Tommy 
Critchlow (non-grad), and Fred 
Peyser. Though all were commis- 
sioned in the Naval Reserve, they will 
serve on active duty. 

From the Public Relations Officers 
of the Naval Air Stations at Anacos- 
tia and Jacksonville, word has been 
sent that George Pinto, ex-'42, and 
Don Fraser, '41, have joined that 
branch of the service. George Pin- 
to "was awarded his coveted Navy 
wings and a commission as Ensign in 
the Naval Reserve after successfully 
completing a training course at the 
huge Naval Air Station in Jackson- 
ville, Florida." Don Fraser has com- 
pleted his preliminary flight training 
at the Naval Reserve Aviation Base 
at Anacostia. 



Players Decide To 
Reduce Play List 

May Production Will Be Held 
For Summer Session 



The Washington Players will carry 
on through the summer session, by a 
unanimous vote of the members. 

At the regular meeting held Wed- 
nesday evening, President Henry Ma- 
guire presented a plan suggested by 
Dr. Tolles whereby the club would 
cancel its spring play and would con- 
1 tinue through the summer session. 
This club is the first to plan a pro- 
gram for the summer session. 

The play originally scheduled for 
May will be presented during the 
summer but will be included on the 
season tickets sold this year. 

"The Night of January 16" was 
tentatively selected for the March 
production of the group, but at the 
Wednesday meeting it was decided to 
leave the selection up to the play 
committee. In all probability the 
play selected will be a comedy. 

A new constitution was presented 
to the group in lieu of the old one 
which has been lost in the past two 
years. A committee was appointed 
to revise and amend it according to 
the needs of the organization. It 
will b« presented at the next meeting. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, i m, 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 
OP WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 
Established 1782 
Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and' alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in lengthy 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



Member 

Associated Collegiate Press 

Distributor of 

Gplleftiate Di6est 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Colle&c Publishers Representative 
AZO Madison Ave. New York. N. Y 

CHICAGO ' BOStON ■ LOS UnOELES ■ S»B FhaNCISCO 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1942 



Choosing A Fraternity 

Sometime in the near future a large group of freshmen 
boys will be expected to make the very important decision of 
selecting their fraternity. According to Hoyle, in undertaking 
this ordeal one should first consider what the fraternity can do 
for him and what he feels he can do for the fraternity. This is 
a standard part of all fraternity sales talk and should be shoved 
aside with a grain of salt. There are numerous more important 
things to consider in making your selection. A candidate 
: hould endeavor to select the group for which he is socially fit- 
led. This is best accomplished by visiting all the houses and 
entering into the life thereabouts. You should look into the 
future and select those you would like to spend your remaining 
college days with. Thus it is evident that your choice of friends 
should be regarded seriously. The prospective pledge should 
not be swayed by promises of campus offices or by the apparent 
strength of the respective fraternities on the Hill. In choosing 
your fraternity be sensible, forget most of the ballyhoo spread 
by the fraternity men and make your choice after serious and 
careful consideration. 



THIS WEEK'S- 



PERSONALITY 



-ON THE CAMPUS 



To begin our series of articles on 
outstanding personalities on the cam- 
pus, we have chosen a man who is un- 
doubtedly the one to lead the parade. 
Rufus Clay Johnson is the only man 
on the campus to belong to both hon- 
orary societies, O micron Delta Kap- 
pa and Sigma Sigma Omicvon. His 
third Greek letter organization is 
Kappa Alpha Fraternity. 

Way back in 1921, Rufe, as he is 
called by his friends, was born in Sal- 
isbury, Maryland. He has lived in 
the same home on up through the 
ages. He got his start at Wicomico 
High School where he was president 
of his class for three years. It seems 
as though he went out for the presi- 
dential positions for he was also pres- 
ident of the science club and cotillion 
club as well as being a member of the 
student council and basketball mana- 
ger for two years. 

When Rufe put on shoes for the 
first time and came up to the civiliza- 
tion of Chestertown, he continued to 
be a leader. At present, he is the 
Business Manager of the ELM and one 
of the best. As a matter of fact, 
this is his second year in that posi- 
tion and as far as we know, he is the 
only man to be Business Manager for 




EDITOR'S 
DESK 



v^f 



Rufus Clay Johnson 



two years. Along with all the work 
of this job, Rufe has been manager 
and president of the debate club as 
well as serving in the capacity of vice- 
president of Omicron Delta Kappa 
and the Interfratcrnity Council. He 
(Continued on Page 3) 



WHERE WERE YOU 



Let's Dance 

Every year sees fewer and fewer dances on the campus. 
There used to be at least two formal dances during the first 
semester. This year there was one, if we're not mistaken. 

Some will argue that with the speeding up of the second 
semester, we should cut the number of dances; particularly 
since the request from the faculty that extra-curricular activi- 
ties be curtailed. However, it seems that during times of ex- 
traordinary tenseness and activity there should be more pleas- 
ant diversion. 

And what better could there be than dances, — formal or 
informal. Since the Panhellenic and Inter-fraternity Dances, 
are scheduled for the Spring, it would seem our argument is de- 
feated. There could certainly be more informals; they need 
not be elaborate affairs, — most of the girls are always talking 
about saddle-shoe dances. All-college Night was a great suc- 
cess, and it was only fifty cents per couple. What better way 
to spend a Saturday evening? 



Second semester started as per us- 
ual — w ith Council meetings — plus 
everyone holding his breath till the 
storm blew over. Lots of changes in 
schedules are at least going to pre- 
ent any boredom from setting m 
very soon; night classes will be fun, 
I think! 

Donald Pletts has found out that 
to get a ticket to Maine, you must 
put in an application a week ahead 
of time — they don't know where it 
Also — since when have shirts 
been known to jump? 

'Sam's" room-mate — to date, has 
spoken twenty-seven words altogeth- 
Sam counted them. Not like 
one of the "mob" to say the least. 

Mrs. Lawrence was pondering the 
advisability of placing a Ram's head 



Eagle Or Chesapeake Bay Dog 
Suggested By Frosh As Totem 



"They're unanimously for a mas- 
cot," said Dr. Werner. 

"Yes, but what kind of a mascot?" 
your reporter asked. He Ijad heard 
that a theme on the subject of a mas- 
cot for Washington College had been 
part of the final exam in English 1 
and decided to find out what bright 
ideas the freshmen had. 

"There was a class discussion con- 
cerning possible subjects when the 
theme topic was announced at the fin 
al class meeting. Ruth Broad watei 
suggested the American Eagle, and 
Cherashore the Chesapeake Bay Re 
triever, and some one suggested r 
hatchet, and there were other ideas 
too." 

"In the exam themes ten favored 
the eagle and three the retriever 
Towner thought that our agricultural 
countryside should be considered and 
suggested Muleskinners. Lyle John- 



ston wanted a St. Bernard to be nam- 
ed George, and a fox terrier called 
Washington. He thought that they 
would supplement each other. Neither 
Mariana Everngam nor Joan Connors 
had a definite suggestion, although 
both thought that there were advant 
s in having a mascot and that 
some decision should be reached." 

"Three wild ducks in flight seemed 
a good symbol to Burrows, because of 
its local tie-up. Other ideas included 
Hall's Red-Raiders, Marie Merriken's 
selection of the moose, Dorothy Rein- 
dollar's jaguar, Isabel Lowery's elm, 
and Vivian Dinger's trotting horse." 

Your reporter found that most of 
these freshmen favored having a vote 
in assembly, if there was sufficient 
general interest, and felt that Editor 
Jones and The Elm deserved credit 
for bringing the topic into discussion. 



the dining hall door — Jone's 



Between semesters was lots of fun 
and Sunday dinner was in the form of 
a banquet — all very well done. 

Reid Hall was shaking on its foun- 
dations Tuesday night when the fresh- 
men gals decided that they need a 
change of roommates. Is everybody 
happy? 

That brings up the matter of in- 
dices — or would it be better to drop 
it before we start? Let's drop it. 

Having done some heavy concen- 
trating — it seems that there have 
been no formal dances all the past se- 
mester — and this semester they all 
come at once. Nice arrangement, 
ain't it? 

Whenever the waiters ask Frank 
Samele what he wants, he blushes. 



LIL' ABNER- 



»y ALCAPP 




1 



;■ 



THIS YOUNGER 
GENERATION 

One of the things that unprea, 
us the most when we first came tott 
Washington College Campus in fffl 
was the fact that everyone spoke, ft 
ginning the first day, every In -hi. 
spoke to every uppev-classmnn whetl 
er he knew him or not and, of couti 
the upper-classmen spoke to U 
Freshmen. 

With the class that came in ii 
1940, there was a noticeable 
lack of this friendly spirit. Som. 
mention was made of it in th> 
ELM. As they, the pretty 
Sophomores, became more ■,. 
miliar with the customs of WC, 
they got into the swing of thin 
and spoke. 

It seems as though the pr. 
Freshman Class has gotten into I 
^anie bad habit. Seniors and oth 
upper-classmen go out of their 
to speak and most of the time tfc 
aren't even recognized by the Fr« 
Of course, there are some few 1 
have the habit. Perhaps the 
Freshmen classes before this onew 
wrong. 

OUT OF THE 
MAILBOX 

Saturdway, wo received 
from Jimmy Dougherty, late of \ 
fame and now of Navy fame. Jii 
stationed at Newport, Rhode Islan 
and likes it. Believe it or not, ther 
a fellow there shorter than he i: 
cidentally, Jim Spielman sent t 
card last week informing us that 
was taking the Naval Reserve Tra 
ing course at New York. 

Seems as though Miss Elei 
Healey, correspondent for 
GOLD BUG of Western Mary- 
land College was quite amaz 
at the article in the ELM stall 
that average I. Q. of the Shoi 
men was between 115 and 12 
Also saw in the GOLD BUG 
where a high school acq 1 
ance, Frank Tarbutton of Si 
Iersville (pop. 267) was u 
mously elected president of tfit 
WMC Student Government Al- 
sociation. Congrats Frank! 
Never a day passes now that 
don't receive several letters from I 
various branches of the armed to\ 
cs. Of most recent interest 
two letters, one of which stated tl 
George Pinto, ex-'42, had received I 
Navy wings, and the other annoM 
ing that Don Frasier, '41, has b* 
sent to New Orleans for further W 
ing after completing his prelii 
flight training at the Naval R«« r 
Aviation Base at Anacostia. 
CHESTERTOWN GETS 
POWDER PLANT 

A new corporation, headed by 
Scott Beck, Sr., accepted bids 
week for the construction of a f 4 
der plant in Chestertown. The pi 
will be a branch of the Triumph I 
plosive Company of Elkton and ■ 
be located at the race track, 
corporation announced that it *"■ 
employ about 500 girls and 
start production about March. " 
think what Saturday nights will 
then. 

Mr. L. Bates Russell, Sr. 
named as the recipient of Cfcw 
tertown's Outstanding Cit« 
ship Award this week. ' 
Russell, editor of the ENTE*' 
PRISE has been the publi.her*' 
the ELM for many y« Tt 
Through his many kind act*, #• 
Russell has endeared himielf ' 
ELM staffi. 

Washington College student 
well as everyone else in the tin" 1 
States, will lose an hour's sleep *' 
(Continued on Page 3) 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



With The= 



Greeks 



Theta Chi 
Nelson Sohl, ex-'42, and James O. 
gush, '41, are now stationed at Max- 
veil Field, Montgomery, Alabama, in 
the U. S. Air Corps. 

J. Ernest Shockley, '40, George 
Gn'eb, '40, Robert Everett, '40, 
Chuck Collins, '40, and Reed Hart- 
nett, '41, returned to the campus for 
[lie week-end. Brother Grieb is now 
i Ensign in the United States Naval 
eserves. 

A new rug has been purchased and 
ventian blinds have been installed 
the game rooms. A new suite of 
furniture has been ordered and is ex- 
pected to arrive soon. 

Lloyd R. Davis, '42 and Marty 
ffni'ther, '43, have applied for the 
V-7 Branch of the Naval Reserve 
They were both sworn in during the 
between semester holiday. 



Alpha Chi Omega 

Peggy Wollcott was formally pledg- 
ed to the chapter yesterday afternoon 

Initiation will be held next Friday 
evening. Saturday the chapter will en- 
tertain its new initates at its regular 
banquet. 



Zeta Tau Alpha 
Phyllis Peters and Ami Fenderson 

will return to the campus on Monday. 

They have been attending a Y. W. C. 

A, convention in Washington. 
Monday night at the regular meet- 
ig the chapter will serve refresh- 
ents in honor of Ruth Smith's re- 
nt initiation. 



FOJ^ICTORY 



BUY 

UNITED 

STATES 
DEFENSE 

SONDS 
STAMPS 




WAR NEEDS MONEY! 

It will cost money to defeat our 
enemy stressors. Your govern- 
ment calls on you to help now. 

Buy Defense Bonds or Stamps 
today. Make every pay day Bond 
Day by participating in the Pay- 
toll Savings Plan. 

Bonds cost $18.75 and up. 
Stamps are 10i, 2S( and up. 

The help of every individual is 
needed. 

Do your part by buying your 
•hare every pay day. 



For those little things 
you are always needing 

in your room and for 

dress — 



Stop in at — 



FOX'S 

5c to $1.00 Store 



Personality , 



{Continued from Page 2) 
also served a term on the Student 
Council. 

Along with all his extra-curricular 
work, Rufe has been outstanding in 
that he has maintained a high schol- 
astic average. The fact that he is a 
member of Sigma Sigma Omicron ver- 
ifies this and, in addition, he is the 
holder of a Distinguished Scholar- 
ship and the Visitors and Governors 
scholarship. 

Never let it be said that Rufe is all 
work and no play because he plays 
'round plenty. Over Reid Hall way, 
it's the friendly little Neighbor that 
commands his attention and way down 
Salisbury way, it's coon hunting. In- 
cidentally, Rufe is recognized down 
there as a very fine coon hunter. 

Early this fall, Rufe was elected 
to Who's Who Among Students in 
American Colleges and Universities. 
As for a future, he is undecided. 
Some day, he's going to flip a coin 
to see .whether he'll be a hovse doctor 
or a lawyer. The latter seems most 
probable to win. No matter which 
does win, you can bet your bottom 
dollar Rufe will continue to love to 
argue and be stubborn. 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



(Continued from Page 2) 
day when Daylight Saving time goes 
into effect. Forgetting to set your 
clock won't be any excuse for missing 
an eight o'clock class. 

We are glad to see that some- 
one reads our column. This 
faithful correspondent always 
closes letters — so long and thir- 
ty. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



THE 


FITCH 


DUSTDOWN CO. 


Janitor 


Supplies 


Baltimore 


Maryland 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 








T 


BE MY VALENTINE! 


Ask her with a gift from 


Remember 


Hutzler's, Dan Cupid's 
headquarters. 




Give her a frivolous 


BILL 


gadget or a sensible neces- 


BENNETT'S 


sity from 


A 


HUTZLER BP0THERS © 




Baltimore, Md. 







SCHUMACHER & SE1LER, 

INC. 

Wholesalers of 

Plumbing - Heating Materials 

Baltimore, Maryland 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



Dr. W. H. Moyer 

CHIROPRACTOR 
X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Fydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 



phone 14 



For that 


"Esquire look" . . . 


buy your clothes 


. . . and furnishings at 


Leed S in Baltimore 


15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration" 
Phone 48 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., FEB. 9-10-11 
—TWO GARBOS IN ONE PICTURE- 
GRETA GARBO - MELVYN DOUGLAS 



"TWO-FACED WOMAN" " 

with CONSTANCE BENNETT 

and ROLAND YOUNG 

Teamed for the first time since "Ninotch- 
ka." GARBO and DOUGLAS bring you 
twice the love, laughs and sparkle. 



THUR. - FRI. - SAT., FEB. 12 - 13 - 14 

The author of "The Thin Man" has a new 
story and its his very best. 

HUMPHREY BOGART - MARY ASTOR 
— in — 

"THE MALTESE FALCON" 

A brand new mystery hit from Warner 
Brothers and it is a picture with a real 
"wallop". 

— Selected Short Subjects Each Night — 





No Cramming Necessary! 

For swell flavor and 

real chewing fun -the 

answer is delicious 

Wrigley's Spearmint Gum 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, lto 



Pentagon Ties For 
8th Spot In League 



The Flying Dutchmen jumped from 
eleventh to a tie for eiyhth place ; n 
the Mason-Dixon Conference Wed- 
nesday night by virtue of a 43-33 
trouncing of Catholic University on 
the latter's floor. The Shoremen 
took an early lead which they main- 
tained throughout the game. Score 
at half-time was 16-10. 

The Maroons got off to a slow start. 
Sloppy dribbling, bad passes, and fre- 
quent fouls marred the game. Mc- 
Niff dropped the first two-pointer for 
the Shoremen after three minutes 
while it took nine minutes for Scanlon 
of Catholic U. to sink their initial tal- 
ly. 

Samele and McNiff were outstand- 
ing for the locals scoring 18 and 11 
points respectively. Tall Dick Scan- 
lon lead his team in scoring with 10 
points. 

The Dutchmen will attempt to con- 
tinue their winning streak -tomorrow 
night by defeating Loyola, league 
leaders, at Evergreen. 



Washington G F T 

Samele, f 5 8-11 18 

Yerkes, f 0-1 

Juliana, f 0-0 

Benjamin, c 0-1 

Lentz, c 0-0 

Voith, c 1 1-2 3 

McNiff, g 5 1-2 11 

Gibe, g 1 0-0 2 

Stevens, g 3 3-5 9 




Totals 15 13-22 43 



Catholic U. G F T 

Rice, f 3 1-2 7 

O'Brien, f 3 2-5 8 

Limanek, f 0-2 

Scanlon, e 1 4 2-4 10 

Sullivan, c 0-0 

Panago, g 1 0-1 2 

Cherelo, g 1 1-2 3 

Con-ado, g 2-2 2 

Baltrukonis, g 1-1 1 

Mercak, g 1 0-0 2 



Totals 13 8-20 33 



Maroons Beat Towson By 30 Points 



Washington G F T 

Snmele, f 4 2-2 10 

Yerkes, f 8 1-2 17 

Juliana, f 1 0-0 2 

Huff, f 1 0-0 2 

Lire, f 0-0 

ilenjamin, c 3 0-0 6 

Voith, c 1 0-2 2 

McNiff, e 3 3 " 8 9 

Gibe, g 1 1-1 3 

Stevens, g 4 0-1 8 

Lentz, g - 0-0 

Tare, 1 1-0 3 



Totals 27 8-16 6' 



Towson G F T 

Thompson, 1 3 3-8 

Wheeler, f 1 0-2 2 

Brilliant, £ 0-0 

Spellman, c _' 0-0 

Nines, g 8 0-0 16 

Krieger, g 1 3-9 5 

Chilcoat, g 1 3-9 5 

Pulse, g 0-0 



Totals 13 6-19 32 



Secret study, secret thought, is, af- 
ter all, the mightiest agent in human 
affairs. — Channing. 



SCHEDULE FOR EVENING CLASSES 



CLASSES MEETING AT: 



:00 a. m. — Tuesday 
Thursday 

Saturday 



9:00 a. m. — Monday 

Wednesday 

Friday 



9:00 a. m. — Tuesday 
Thursday 
Saturday 



11:00 a. m. — Monday 

Wednesday 

Friday 



11.00 a. m. — Tuesday 
Saturday 
1:15 p. m. — Thursday 



8:00 a. m. — Monday 

Wednesday 
Friday 



2:15 p. m. 



-Tuesday 
Thursday 



, m. — Monday 

Wednesday 
Friday ^ 



-Tuesday 

Thursday 
Saturday 



WILL MEET AT: 



7:00 p. m. — February 9 
February 11 
February 13 



7:00 p. m. — February 16 
February 18 
February 20 



7:00 p. m. — February 23 
February 25 
February 27 



7:00 p. m. — March 2 
March 4 

March 6 



7:00 p. m. — March 9 
March 11 
March 13 



7:00 p. m. — March 16 
March 18 
March 20 



7:00 p. m. — March 23 
March 25 



7:00 p. m. — April 6 
April 8 
April 10 



1:15 p. m. — Monday* 

Wednesday* 
Friday* 



2:15 p. m. 



—Monday* 
Wednesday* 
Friday* 



7:00 p. m. — April 13 
April 15 
April 17 



7:00 p. m. — April 20 
April 22 
April 24 



7:00 p. m. — Ap/il 27 
April 29 
May 1 



'Asterisk indicates "non-lab." period. 

Note: Education 12 will meet on May 4, 6 at 7 to 8 p. m. Laboratory 

classes will extend regular laboratory periods to cover extra 

work required. 



Coach Fred Dumschott's cagers, 
with seven Mason-Dixon league tilts 
remaining, face an arduous task in or- 
der to gain a play-off berth. This 
week, the Sho'men face the loop 
leader, Loyola's Green and Gray in 
the initial test between these two 
teams. Coach Emil Reitz's boys are 
setting a hot pace and have incurred 
but one defeat against nine wins. 
Earlier in the week, the Maroons will 
oppose Catholic U. on the latter's 
court. The Catholics are in the up- 
per bracket and are considerably 
strengthened over last year's aggre- 
gation. 

Following these two tussles, the 
Sho'men will endeavor to reap wins 
over the league's cream of the crop. 
They will face Mount St. Mary's, Del- 
aware, Western Md.. Catholic U., and 
Loyola in that order for the final 
"coup d'etat", so to speak. Whether 
the Sho'men have the stuff to over- 
come such formidable foes in so short 
period of time should provided add- 
ed interest to the Mason-Dixon Loop 
fans. Undoubtedly, the odds are 
against the locals, but the way things 
have happened thus far, the impossi- 
ble is liable to occur. Mound St. 
Mary's, for instance, after a slow 
start, and apparently headed no- 
where, inaugurated a spurt which 
bounced them into fourth place. The 
Mountaineers toppled over the Sho'- 
men 44-41, upset a favored Western 
Maryland quint 46-39, and trounced 
Johns Hopkins, 51-31. Now the 
Emmitsburgers have designs on third 
place and\can gain that spot by oust- 
ing Western Maryland's Terrors. 

The Maroons' recent victory over 
Towson Teachers, 62-32, should not 
be taken as an indication that the lo- 
cals are on the upgrade. What it did 
demonstrate, however, is the fact that 
if the Sho'men have ambitions lo 
drive toward the playoffs, they most 
definitely have to begin playing the 
brand of basketball which they are 
capable of. Thus far this season, the 
locals have been an "in and out" 
team. Whether the reasons for their 
interesting games with Baltimore U. 
were the fact that the Bees just 
weren't right those nights or that the 
Maroons are a nemesis to the Bees, 
is hard to tell. But, regardless of 
the past, Sho' followers would cer- 
tainly welcome a reversal of form 
and to witness better basketball 
games. 

In the high-scoring parade, which 
now finds seven men in the "100" 
class, are two Washington College 
players. Frank Samele, Maroons' 
dead-eye forward, is in the fourth 
spot with a total of 113 points and 
Jim Stevens, other Maroon speedster 
forward, is in tenth slot with 88 
points. It's baffling for Sho' fans to 
predict who really is going to score 
for the locals. Throughout the sea- 
son, no one individual has scored con- 
sistently. The brunt of the Maroon 
attack (?) lies in McNiff, Samele, 
Stevens, and Yerkees. But the fun- 
ny thing is that in attempting to 
prognosticate a high-scorer, the un- 
predictable captures the honor. 

Ernie Travis, tall Terrapin center, 
leads the parade with a grand total 
of 184 points. Travis has an aver 
age of 15.3 points per game which is 
sharpshooting in any league. Nat 
Witinisky and Paul Oberhaus, Balti- 
more U., are in the second and third 
positions, respectively, with 131 
and 130 poinjs apiece. Mogowski 
Western Md., 105; Thobe, Loyola 
103; Suffern, Western Md., 100; Har 
kins, Mounts, 98; and Cic Bock, Loy- 
ola, 92, round out the first ten scor- 
ers. 



GIRLS' 

SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



At the regular meeting of the G. 
I. A. A., which met on Monday, the 
board decided to no longer have the 
boys on the campus for referees, but 
instead the girls who are taking Edu- 
cation 12, will referee for practical 
experience. 

The basketball season will be short- 
ened by the elimination of the teams 
with lower averages, however it has 
not been decided when they will be 
eliminated. 

Since the basketball games are so 
well attended the board decided lo 
sell candy and chewing-gum to the 
eager by-standers. 

Games will begin Thursday night 
and will continue until some team is 
victorious, with two games scheduled 
every Tuesday and Trursday. 

You, Too, Should 
Have Stayed Here 

Now that school has officially re- 
opened, only rosy memories are held 
by those who stayed at college be- 
tween semesters. Saturday, the last 
few gallant students buckled under 
the strain of exams, and shoved off 
for home. 

By dinner time, there were only 
the basketball boys and about five 
tables of students. The dining hall 
looked as though a drought had swept 
it. But bold plans were made for 
Sunday dinner, and everyone was 
promised a surprise. 

The drenching curtain of rain part 



ed before an all but full moon gRfl 
ing the one or two lost clouds tv. 
searched the sky. Inside, a ball ibom 
active and vibrant that the nito 
passed up and down the floor i« 
one-sided basketball game, — We ti 
five men to their one. 

They said there were two tables. 
Sunday breakfast; some people u 
indomitable. But for most, tjj n 
was the first meal of the dny.w. 
bad more couldn't have been here 
enjoy it. Mrs. Lawrence was a mq 






gracious hostess, greeting her thi 
odd guests from behind the b; 
table. All the rectangular tn 
were pushed together to form a r 
lace tables cloths, cedar boughs, a u 
cadlies lent a festive air. A stci 
dinner more thun satisfied both tl 
gourmets and the gourmand: 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractor. - Buitderi 

Phono 305 - 288 — Camput Aw, 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 

Chestertown, Maryland 

Phone 132W 



Gill's 

Is 
Your 
Date 

Headquarters 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 



WONG LEE 

CHINESE 

LAUNDRY 

317 Cannon St. 

Chestertown, Md. 



C0RKHILL 
FRANKS 

ARE GOOD 
ANYTIME 

Every Time! 



PARENTS- 
while IN TOWN SPEND THE NIGHT AT 

THE SOPHIE FISHER INN 

Rooms With Private Bath Dining Room 

Route 213 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 




••••• 

"V" 

••••• 



r„l. XLI. No. 18. 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1942 



Price Five Cents 



Almost 50% Washington Men Will 
Register Here Saturday, Monday 



}micron Delta Kappa Takes 
Three Men In Tap Program 



Finds Winning Combine 



Busil C. Clark, S. Omar Jackson, 
■„ and A. Rayfield Kivby were tap- 
ed by the local circle of Omicron 
lcll;i Kappa, the national honor or- 
diization for men, at the assembly 
isterday. 

Harry Lore, president of the Alpha 
ircle, opened the program and 
deduced the several speakers. Hav- 
g concluded the tapping procedure 
nd the customary congratulatory re- 
arks, Lore presented Dr. Win ton 
Hies, faculty secretary of the Sucie- 
, as the feature speaker. 
"Leadership like charity begins at 
ime," Dr. Tolles began, "and every 
iuIct is a follower." Speaking on 
ne of the requirements for member- 
hip in this organization, he listed the 
ni'actei'istics of the true leader. 
rsl of all het noted that a true lead- 
is humble before the task he has 
i do. He realizes that he is not too 
nod for the job that lies ahead. 
Next Dr. Tolles mentioned that a 
ue leader is tolerant and that he 
Ids no social, racial, or fraternal 
ejudices. A third characteristic 
tributed to a leader is that he has 
sense of humor and makes work joy 
": i i followers. He has a distinct 
nse of balance. 

In conclusion, Dr. Tolles stated 
hiU the true leader possesses cour- 
1 and is determined to do his best 
all times under any and all condi- 
ons. 

The program was opened with 

ee student talks. The first speak- 

Lloyd Davis, briefly summarized 

founding of ODK at Washington 

Id Lee University on December 3, 

914, by J. Carl Fisher and its spread 



Studebaker Gives 
War Statement 



The latest statement from Dr. John 
W. Studebaker, United States Com- 
missioner of Education, addressed to 
students throughout the country, is as 
follows: 

Dr. John Ward Studebaker, United 
States Commissioner of Education, 
said, "Stay in school! Continue the 
normal course of your education. 
Await the call to specialized service in 
whatever capacity the government 
may direct. Become better trained 
to render service when the call comes. 
Certainly the problems to be solved j 
in the days ahead will call for every 
bit of trained intelligence and sacri- 
ficial service which this nation can 
muster. It would be short-sighted 
indeed, if in the emotional exalta- 
tion of the moment, you should inter- 
rupt your preparation for service." 




to over fifty universities and colleges 
in this country. David Bartolini ex- 
plained the purpose of the Society 
and the qualifications for member- 
ship. He said that ODK's aim is two- 
fold: to recognize men who have 
achieved prominence in college activ- 
ities, and to maintain a close union 
between the student body and the 
faculty. 

Rufus Johnson, as the third student 
speaker, discussed the activities of 
the circle on our own campus. Not 
only docs the ODK try to be of ser- 
vice, he said, but one of its main en- 
(Continued on Page 6) 



f You Think You're Absent-Minded 
Read This Story And Be Relieved 



Just when your reporter had be- 
" to think Washington College was 
nniune to the plague of absent-mind- 
professors, this one pops up. 
One day last week. Mr. Johns was 
oi'ig home from work and saw a loi.e 
ai- parked in back of Bill Smith. 
'hen he came to work the next moin- 
'?, the same car was there. He took 
he license number to see if the stu- 
e nt had registered his automobile. 
Dr. Livingood scanned his list of 
'gistrations and saw that no car was 
mistered with that license number. 
is first impulse was to have the car 
Wed downtown in accordance with 
te Administration's rule on automo- 
iles. 

He was only stopped by Miss Mat- 
lu who intervened on behalf of the 
"fortunate student who had been 
J ught. Upon second thought, Doc 
""oght he'd find out whose car it was 
n 'l have a talk with the lad. He 
a lled the sheriff. 
"Hello. Sheriff, this is Dr. Liviu- 
°od at Washington College. Would 
"u tell me under whose name the car 
Vl, h this license is registered." 
"I'll call you back in five minutes, 



Coach Dutch Dumschott believes he 
has at last hit upon the winning com- 
bination for the basketball team. He 
will put the boys to test tonight at 
Emmitsburg when the Dutchmen meet 
Mt. St. Mary's. 




Doc," was the reply. 

In precisely five minutes, the sher- 
iff called. "Hello, Doc. That car is 
registered under the name of F. G. 
Livingood." 



Inter-Class Plays 
Will Be Staged 
Today A Week 

Despite the holiday on Saturday, 
February 21, the class plays will be 
presented on Friday. It is believed 
that few of the students will go home, 
and a sizeable crowd is expected. 

"Objections Over-Ruled" will be 
dramatized by the Freshmen. There 
are three main characters, the boy 
who detests cheese, the girl who hates 
hounds, and Jane, who frankly _ ex- 
presses her ideas about the smooching 
of the other two. The cast: 

The girl — Ann Boiling. 

The boy — "Shorty" Pierce (a lover, 
by George). 

Janes — Ruth Johnson. 

These three characters have a mer- 
y dialogue and not until the end do 
hey clarify the plot. 

The Junior play, directed by Phyl- 
lis Peters, centers around a crime re- 
lorter — a part which Jean Messick is 
being persuaded to take — and a short, 
black-haired gangster, Mike Alteri. 
Bill Roe has a perfect part, a young 
cporter aiming "to set the world on 
■Me." Austin Murphy, dizzy Betty 
Dockhorn and Ellen Peters, new 
•'glamour girl" have supporting roles. 
Cal Carney will be stage manager. 

The Juniors still lack a person for 
the leading role — the hard, but fair, 
editor of the paper. Any one inter- 
ested in the part please see Phyllis 
Peters. 

A very serious play, "The Fallen 
Bough," has been selected by the 
Sophomores. As yet, the parts have 
not been assigned. The story con- 
cerns a young writer who has been 
permanently crippled by an automo- 
bile accident. He marries a very de- 
voted young lady whom he does not 
love. Later his first and real love re- 



Approximately fifty per cent 
of Washington College's men 
will register for military ser- 
vice tomorrow, Sunday, and 
Monday. J. Thomas Kibler, 
chairman of the Local Board, 
announced this week that Kent 
Countians would register at the 
Chestertown Elementary 
School. 

The registration this week- 
end and Monday will affect all 
those twenty-years-old and un- 
der thirty-six who have not reg- 
istered previously. 

The registration polls at the Ele- 
mentary School will be open from 
seven a. m. to nine p. m. 

No Change In Regulation 

A statement has been secured from 
the Selective Service authorities to 
the effect that no changes have been 
made in the regulations, and the sys- 
tem will be the same as in the two 
previous registrations. That means 
that all in Washington College may 
register here in Chestertown, but 
that their cards will be sent to their 
home Boards, if they so desire. 

All that is necessary is to be care- 
ful what is put down on the card as to 
home address. If "Washington Col 
lege" or "Chestertown" appears a: 
"home address", the card will remain 
here, Chestertown, and all future deal- 
ings will be with the Chestertown 
Board. 

Be Sure Of Home Address 

To have his future relations hand- 
led by the Board of his home com- 
munity, a man must be sure to put 
down his permanent home address. 
The card will automatically be sent 
to the Board supervising his neigh- 
borhood. 



Tarns Into Writer 




Coach J. Thomas Kibler is the 
guest editorialist on the ELM staff 
this week. Coach Kibler's editorial 
will be found on page five. 



Book Quoto Is 
Doubled With 
2104 Volumes 



Freskmen Elect President 
And Council Representative 



On Friday, February 6, the Fresh- 
man class met to hold elections in the 
assembly. Norman Tarr was elected 
President of the class and Roger Ber- 
ry was elected as the Freshman re- 
presentative on the Mens' Govern- 
ment Association. The elections 
were carried over until Tuesday 10, 
when Pete Shinnamon was elected as 
Vice-President and Joan Conners was 
elected Secretary-Treasurer of the 
class. 



More than doubling its quota, the 
Kent County Victory Book Campaign 
Committee has sent 2104 volumes tcv 
the armed forces, according to Mrs. 
J. S. W. Jones and has an additional 
one hundred volumes to send. 

The national campaign began on. 
January 12 when quotas were distri- 
buted to committee chairmen selected 
throughout the nation. By means of 
the tea held in the Bunting Library 
for which a volume was the price of 
admission and through other contri- 
butions by students, faculty mem- 
bers, and residents of Kent County, 
the 1000 volume quota was rapidly 
whittled away. 

Over 400 volumes had been collect- 
ed before the tea was given, and the 
quota had been completed by the ev- 
ening of that event. Books contin- 
ued to pour in right up to the end 
of the campaign on February 4, and 
contributions have been received ev- 
en since that time. 

These books, novels, biographies, 
text books, reading both light and 
heavy, will be distributed to the var- 
ious training camps. The success of 
the local committee, it is interesting 
to note, far surpasses the average for 
the nation as reported in the metro- 
politan press. 



Mr. Libbey, Assistant Librarian at 
Washington College is the author of 
"The Local Library — Its Own Re 
search Center", an article in the cur- 
rent issue of the Bulletin of the Maine 
Library Association. 



Change Of Time 
Creates Havoc 
With Meals Here 



turns to his life and he is faced with 
the problem of having to choose be- 
tween the two. 

The play is under the charges of 
Rudy Parks, Lee Lachmar and Betty 
Hill. 

As yet, the Seniors have done noth- 
ing toward presenting a play. There 
is an abundance of acting material 
in this class, and it is hoped that a 
play will be forthcoming. 

The Washington Players will spon- 
sor these one-act plays. Admission 
is twenty-five cents or by season tick- 



Wartime wasn't greeted with much 
enthusiasm on the Washington- Col- 
lege campus. It's difficult to be en- 
thusiastic about anything on an emp- 
ty stomach. 

The Negro cooks of the dining hall 
were a bit confused. Instead of set- 
ting their clocks ahead one hour, they 
set them back. They didn't arrive in 
time to get breakfast. They almost 
missed lunch. 

Bill Paca afforded a humourous 
note. Bill got up for breakfast for 
the first time of the year Monday on- 
ly to find that there was no breakfast. 
He hasn't been up that early since. 

Many of those who weren't asleep 
in their eight o'clock classes saw the 
sun come up for the first time. 

Those who told their time by the 
sun almost missed dinner. Those 
who had after-dinner dates got gyp- 
ped. 

On a whole, Washington College 
accepted Wartime smoothly. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13 



Thirty-One Men Pledge To Frais Yesterday 



29 Hour Silence Period Ends 
With Pledging Ceremonies 



After a twenty-nine hour silence 
period yesterday, the three fraterni- 
ties on the Washington College cam- 
pus gave hids to thirty-one men. 
Twenty-five bids were given to fresh- 
men and six were awarded to upper- 
classmen. Kappa Alpha pledged the 
greatest number of men with eleven 
while Theta Chi and Lambda Chi Al- 
pha each pledged ten. 

Lambda Chi Alpha and Theta Chi 
held their pledge ceremonies in their 
respective houses last night and fol- 
lowed them with smokers for the act- 
ive members, pledges and affiliates. 
After a pledge ceremony at the Theta 
Chi House, a banquet was held for 
their members and pledges at the 
Chestertown Restaurant. 

Lambda Chi Alpha will hold its 
banquet Sunday night at the Chester- 
town Restaurant while Kappa Alpha 
will hold its banquet at the Sophie 
Fisher Inn. 

The men pledged were as follows: 
Kappa Alpha 

Carl Brutz, William Hoban, Guy 
Learner, Valentine Lentz, William 
Loll, Robert Munyan, Albert Nowak, 
James Stevens, Norman Tarr, Fran- 
cis Tuopec, and Gerald Voith. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Francis Shinnamon, Terrence Bur- 
rows, Robert Pierce, Robert Hors- 
field, Walter Woodford, Branch War- 
field, Russell English, Harold Eng- 
lish, Jack McHale, and Paul Llewel- 
lyn. 

Theta Chi 

Roger Berry,' Lee Wilkinson, Ed- 
ward Bosc, Robert Grove, Turner 
Hastings, Warren Hodges, William 
Carver, John Hitchcock, Theodore 
Lytwyn, and William Prettyman. 



Will Be Featured At Inter-Sorority Dance 




Board Will Meet 
Week To Discuss 
Extra Session 



Pepper Asner, drummer for Lew Lortz's Orchestra which 
will play for the Inter-Sorority Dance, March 7, has recently 
joined the band after playing a theatre circuit on the east coast. 
In the short time he has been playing in Baltimore, he has made 
a reputation as being an ace drummer. He is featured on 
Krupa arrangements used by the orchestra. 



Board Will Probably Vote For 
Summer Session 



According to President Gilbert W. 
Mead, the Board of Visitors and Gov- 
ernors will meet at the College on 
February 21. It will be the Board's 
second meeting during the current 
school year. 

Dr. Mead will present the faculty's 
petition recommending inauguration 
of a summer session to the Board. The 
Board is expected to accept the re- 
commendation readily and give ord- 
ers for the installation of the summer 
session. 

Although the faculty petitioned un- 
animously for the addition of a sum- 
mer session, it is reported that no de 
finite plans have yet been made. The 
Faculty Emergency Committee, work- 
ing in cooperation with the Board and 
the Administration, will probably lay 
the final plans. 

At present, rumors which Dr. Mead 
has neither confirmed nor denied, 
have it that a student will be able to 
complete a full term's work in a sum 
mer and that high school seniors wil 
be admitted to the summer session. 



Nineteen Students Listed 
To Receive Unlimited Cm 

Nineteen students were nann 
the Honorary Dean's List this mo n f 
To make the Dean's List, a stud* 
must attain a semester grade of 2 
for which he is rewarded with unlii 
ited cuts. 

Those named were: 

Marjorie Starr, Robert Livings!, 
Alice Jolianns, Rufus Johnson, Atl, 
Kepler, Catherine Newton, jfflj 
Dorf, Robert Carter, Mortimer Gn r 
son, Robert Crane, James Diacun 
kos, Ernest Larmore, Virginia Cm 
er, Albert Mooney, Norma J e 
Wood, Omar Jackson, Robert 
and Leonard Parris. 



Naval Reservises Visit 
Campus This Wednesi 



On Wednesday, February 18, Lit 
tenant F. E. Chatard, USNR, 
Chief Yeoman William E. Mcdfoi 
will be on the campus to intcrvii 
and to sign up any prospective app 
cants in class V-7, U. S. Naval 
serve. 

Candidates are asked to have bii 
certificates on February 18. 



Faculty Allows 
Blue Print Class 
To Be Installed 



Course Will Meet Three Days 
A Week For Twelve Weeks 



Dr. Mead Will 
Lecture Here 



'Youth, Education And Th( 

Crises" Will Be Theme Of 

Mead's History Lecture 



The Curriculum Committee of the 
Faculty granted Warren J. Hodges 
the privilege of offering a course on 
blue print reading. The course, 
which will be offered three times a 
week for twelve weeks, will not be 
accepted by the college for gradua- 
tion. 

The following was the committee 
action; "That Mr. Warren J. Hodges 
be given the privilege of offering 
course in blue print reading without 
college credit. Individuals taking the 
course, and who have satisfied M: 
Hodges' requirements, will be certi- 
fied as to type of course, hours devot- 
ed to the course and grade. Any fin- 
ancial arrangements for tuition must 
be between Mr. Hodges and persons 
taking the course. The college of- 
fers to provide a classroom and make 
the necessary arrangements looking 
toward the organization of the 
course." 

Mr. Hodges took a year's course in 
blue print reading from the Balti- 
more City Board of Education. After 
this course, he practiced his profes- 
sion at Martin's in Baltimore. 

Hodges will hold a meeting Mon- 
day at 12:45 in Room 26 of William 
Smith Hall at whieh all those who are 
interested in taking the course will 
sign up. According to Mr. Hodges, 
tuition for the course will not exceed 
$5.00. 



"Youth, Education, and the Pres- 
ent Crisis" will be the topic of Pres- 
ident Gilbert W. Mead's lecture be- 
fore the Historical Society Wednes- 
day evening. The lecture, which is 
the second in "The Present Crisis" 
series being presented by the Histor- 
ical Society, will be given in the aud- 
itorium of William Smith Hall at S 
o'clock Wednesday evening. The en- 
tire student body is invited and urged 
to attend. 

Dr. Mead is expected to bring out 
all the important phases of this war 
in connection with the youth of Amer- 
ica and its educational system. 

The lectures of "The Present Cris- 
es" series will be given in the audi- 
torium every other Wednesday even- 
ing. All phases of the crisis will be 
dealt with. Some of the speakers 
are Dr. Fred G. Livingood, Dr. Esther 
M. Dole, Dr. H. 0. Werner, Dr. Win- 
ton Tolles and Professor Fred Dum- 
schott. 

Students who are interested in be- 
coming well informed on current 
events are urged to attend. 



ODK Plans Sale 
Of Stamps Here 

Stamps Will Be Sold Through 
Members Of ODK 



Harry Lore, president of ODK, an- 
nounced this week that that organ- 
ization would begin the sale of De- 
fense Stamps immediately. This will 
be done in accordance with ODK's 
policy of a service organization, 

Stamps will be sold "through the 
members of the fraternity. .With 
each ten or twenty-five cent stamp 
purchased, an album will be given 
free in which to keep the stamps. 
$18.75 worth of stamps may be trad- 
ed at the downtown post office for a 
$25 bond. 



Debate Club Will 
Hold Special Vote 

Withdrawal Of Phil Souder 
Necessitates Election 



Read the ELM 



On Monday night, the Debate Club 
will hold a special election to choose 
a candidate to replace President Phil 
Souder, who recently enlisted in the 
Navy. The member elected will 
serve until the regular annual elec- 
tions in May. 

The club also is faced with a seri- 
ous difficulty caused by the accelerat- 
ed education program in other schools. 
Many colleges with whom we have 
been debating in the past have sus- 
pended all inter-collegiate forensic 
activities for the duration of the war. 
It appears that the club must confine 
itself to church debates and practice 
debates in the club. If this is done, 
a supply of experienced members will 
be available for inter-collegiate com- 
petition when the war is over. 



For those little things 
you are always needing 
in your room and for 
dress — 

Stop in at — 

FOX'S 

5c to $1.00 Store 



Billions for Allied victory ... or 
for tribute to dictators? There is 
only one answer: Buy U. S. Defense 
Bonds and Stamps. 



Sports page photot are through the 
ourtesy of the Transscript. 



Choose 



Hochschild, Kohn & Co. 



for correct 



Campus and College Wear 




Washington College Teams 
Reach Out-Of-Town Contests 




Safely 



Via 



Red Star Motor Coaches, Inc. 





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



CHESTERTOWN, MD. 
Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
a nd alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Jports Editor John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. 0. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



Member 

Associated CbUe6iale Press 

Distributor of 

GoIle6iaie Di6est_ 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publiihers RepresetUalnie 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y 

Chicago ■ Boiioh ■ Los A no [Lit ■ sun fhimicigco 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1942 



Editorial 
Com me nt 

It's Not Just Another Honorary 

Yesterday morning, new men were tapped for membership 
in Omicron Delta Kappa. In so doing, the honorary fraternity 
conferred upon these campus leaders the highest honor an un 
dergraduate body can confer upon a member of the student 
body. 

By the very fact that these men were elected to member- 
ship in ODK is proof that they have excelled in one or more 
phases of campus life. They have been the leaders in their re 
spective fields and have reached the zenith by diligent applica- 
tion and hard work. They have not been merely a good stu- 
dent or an outstanding athlete; they have excelled in two or 
more fields. This shows their versatility as well as ability. To 
obtain this goal they have had to obtain two difficult things — 
the respect of fellow members of the student body and the un- 
animous vote of campus leaders. 

Upon the attainment of this goal, the future lies bright be- 
fore them. They will now have chance to offer suggestions and 
participate in programs that will make Washington College a 
stronger institution and a better place to live. As these men 
will soon find out, if they are not already aware of the fact, 
ODK is a service group that takes an active part in campus af- 
fairs. It cannot be too strongly emphasized that this leader- 
ship fraternity is not just another "honorary." It is an active 
working organization with definite ideals and purposes. The 
acquisition of this new material will make possible the continu- 
ance of these purposes. 

Further responsibility is now upon these campus leaders. 
They have shown their superiority in other activities and now 
have the opportunity to again evidence their excellence. It is 
Quite likely that they will take advantage of the great possibili- 
ties offered them. So to you, new members of Omicron Delta 
Kappa, congratulations, and may you ever live and practice the 
Weals and principles of ODK. 



College Men Face Water Shortage 

Much has been said in the past about the dress of the male 
students at the evening meal. Until recently, there was little or 
no excuse for not wearing a coat and tie to dinner. Now, how- 
ever, things have changed. Approximately one hundred and 
twenty boys are taking gym in the afternoon. Bathing facili- 
ties are not adequate to give all the boys a shower before din- 
ner. Furthermore, there is a distinct lack of hot water. In 
Middle Hall, for example, the plumbing system is so arranged 
that there is usually an over abundance of hot water in the wash 
'asins but, after six or eight men have used the showers, there is 
absolutely no heated water with which to bathe. 

By not wasting time and by cooperating, the boys might 
tind it possible for all to enjoy a bath in the brief time allotted 
between the gym period and dinner time. This "accelerated 
Program" will not, however, furnish hot water. It is hoped 
that this editorial will be noted by the proper authorities and 
that they find it possible to do something to remedy the situa- 
tion. 



THIS WEEK'S 



PERSONALITY 

ON THE CAMPUS 



The second outstanding personality 
on the campus this week is Lloyd 
Robert Davis. Lloyd's "devil may 
care" attitude and ever-ready wit has 
made him one of the college's best 
liked fellows, as well as a conscien- 
tious worker. 

Lloyd, or "Punchy" to you, first 
smiled on the woi'ld back on Ap: 
29, 1920, in the fair city of Philadel- 
phia. As is the usual procedure, he 
attended Barry Grammar and Holmes 
Junior High schools in his home town. 
He moved to Federalsburg, Mary- 
land and graduated from the Fed- 
eralsburg High School. At gradua- 
tion he was awarded the Character 
Medal and the Activities Medal, to say 
nothing of the most important award 
of all, a Meritorious Scholarship to 
Washington College. Thus began 
Lloyd's eventful college career. 

Lloyd started out with a "bang" 
and was appointed Chairman of the 
Freshman class and has held the 
Vice-Presidency of his class for four 
years. In dramatics he is an "ace" 
and was elected Vice-President of the 
Dramatic Club in his junior and sen- 
ior years. He is a member of Theta 
Chi and was secretary of his fratern- 
ity last year and president this year. 
Lloyd is also a member of ODK to 
which he was elected in 1941. Last 
but not least, he is Business Manager 
of the PEGASUS which ends his list 
of college achievements which placed 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 




Lloyd Davis 



him in "Who's Who Among Students 
in American Colleges and Universi- 
ties." 

"Happy-go lucky" Lloyd has an am- 
bition, surprising as it may seem, to 
become a personnel manager. At 
present, he expects to join V-7 in 
October. Until then, he'll continue 
playing Bridge, being everybody's 
friend, and taking care of Ginny. 



ran into Eddy 
Uncle Sam's 



Where 
Were You? 



Babe arrived at the game so early 
Tuesday night that she felt she was 
almost in time for last Saturday 
night's game. Peanut has been with- 
nolding military secrets, but from the 
sounds of it, it's just as well. 

Reid Hall and dates included had 
another fire drill Tuesday — they real- 
ly needed one Sunday night. Lloyd 

is quite a student now — nothing but different minds at the preliminary 
B's will suit him. (games. Note: Coach only made one 

The problem in psychology the oth- basket. 



er day concerned a telephone. Bill 
Paca is still peeved about breakfast 
Monday morning — the first time he 
has gone this year — and look what 

happened. 

"There comes a time ..." Corley. 

Freshman voting the same time as 
in former years. Don't people ever 
get tired of "politicing?" Note to 
Helen Marie Culver: "We know where 
you were." 

The step ladder Rufe was talking 
about acts like it came from Maslin'e 
Antique Shop. How do the boys like 
afternoon exercise? Makes you feel 
good, eh? 

Coach Ekaitis and Dave were of 





ELLEN 

HAMILTON 

and LINA 
MASON 

l\ BOTH MEMBERS OF KAe AT 
VERMONT, WERE THE FIRST 
WOMEN MEMBERS Of PHI BETA 
KAPPA/ 



Among 75,000,000 adults in 
the united states there are \% 
tmes as many complete illiter- 
ates as college graduates / 




ED 

DEVLIN 

TALKED FOR 
69 CONSECUTIVE 

HOURS TO 

FELLOW U.OF 

ALABAMA S1UDENTS 

DURING THE 1940 

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 



HO! HUM! IT'S 
TIME AGAIN 

Ho! Hum! It's time to write 
another column and with all the news 
that's broken this week, we can't 
think of a single thing to fill fifteen 
and a half column inches. The life 
of a newspaper editor is terrible at 
times like these. 

Fraternity bids came out yes- 
terday afternoon and there were 
lots of happy fellow*. Inci- 
dentally, there were lota of fel- 
lows who weren't so happy. 
Sometimes, that bit of unhap- 
pincss is the best medicine in 
the world. 

Along with fraternity bids, came 
the ODK tapping. The fellows who 
received that honor have something 
of which they can be justly proud. 
The high ideals of ODK should be the 
goal for every man of Washington 
College. 
WHO WAKES 
THE BUGLER 

Saturday night, 
Miller who is now 

army stationed at Fort Lee, Virginia. 
Eddy, who was chief trumpeter and 
leader of the Washington College or- 
chestra is now the bugler at that 
camp. We forgot to ask him who 
wakes up the bugler. 

Speaking of those in the armed 
forces, we get cards from them 
daily. In our files, we have the 
addresses of many of the Wash- 
ington College fellows. Nearly 
everyone of them from whom we 
have heard have complained of 
their lack of mail. If you would 
like to write, we would be glad to 
part with the addresses. 
The boys in the service may have 
their daily drilling but they haven't 
got anything on the students at 
Washington College. They have 
daily drills also — in the form of yel- 
low sheets. As one student com- 
plained — "Darned if you don't have 
to do your daily work now." Per- 
haps these yellow sheets will cut out 
that examination cramming. 
ACTIVITIES DURING 
SUMMER SESSION 

Several of the campus organiza- 
tions are considering extending their 
activities into the summer session. As 
a matter of fact, some of them have 
definitely scheduled events for this 
particular semester. It seems to U3 
that this is a bit out of order. 

The plan for the summer ses- 
sion, as we see it, calls for the 
completion of as much work at 
possible in the shortest length of 
time. The administration has 
already requested that extra- 
curricular schedules be cut to a 

now, it should be doubly neces- 
sary during a summer session. 
Some of the under classmen on the 
ELM are even considering running a 
paper during summer school. This to 
us is a physical impossibility. Staff 
will undoubtedly be smaller then they 
are now which would put an impos- 
sible load upon those interested. Be- 
sides, it seems financially impossible. 
We will be lucky to have a paper next 
fall. 

IT'S— SO LONG 
AND THIRTY 

Beginning with week after next's 
ELM, we will retire as an active editor 
and assume an advisory capacity for 
some six or eight weeks. A vacation 
uvill be a relief but a job. 

The idea of our resignation is 
to turn the paper over to the 
candidates for next year's editor- 
ship. They wilt be judged in 
(Continued on Page 5) 



Sport The 



^.k?" 



Section 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM CHESTERTOWN, MD., 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 194^ 



Kardash's 
Corner 



Dutchmen Tangle With Mounts Tonight; 
Are Favored Over Blue Hens Tomorrow 



In their last two efforts, the Sho'- 
men have showed signs of a new lease 
on life. Against Loyola, although 
sustaining a 55-43 defeat, the Ma- 
,,,,,,,:,' scoring attack was clicking for 
the first Lime this season. Coach 
Fred Dumschott's new combination 
sparked by Jim Stevens, at center, 
and Jerry Voith, at forward, kept the 
locals within range of the powerful 
Greyhounds throughout the game. 
The Green and Gray, however, led by 
Vic Bock had too many scoring guns 
for the fighting Sho'men. Bock tal- 
lied twenty-three points, several of 
the sensational variety. Barney 
Goldberg and Bernie Thobe also con- 
tributed to the downfall of the visitors 
with a display of sparkling basket- 
ball. 

Tuesday night against P. M. C. in 
a fast-moving contest all the way, the 
Sho'men defeated the Red and White 
Cadets, 50-47. Jim Stevens, flashy 
center, was "Johnny on the Spot" to 
the home rooters. Stevens, in fact, 
has been the sparkplug of the locals 
in recent games. His outside shoot- 
ing has been spectacular and his one 
hand shots have been difficult tosses 
which weren't sheer luck. Frank 
Samele, Maroons' tireless little for- 
ward, chalked up 13 points to bring 
his season's total around 150. 

Jerry Voith, Frosh star for the 
Sho'men, has been playing bang-up 
ball in his first collegiate campaign. 
In the Loyola game, Jerry was at his 
best, tossing in 13 points and hoiaing 
his own on defense, Jerry repeated 
in the P. M. C. tilt, coming through 
with three successive field goals which 
came at an opportune time. With 
three years of competition ahead of 
him, Jerry should develop into one of 
future stars of Sho'men quints. 

It is interesting to note that prev- 
ious to the Loyola game, inability to 
register free shots was largely re- 
sponsible for several local losses. But 
in the Loyola game, Lew Yerkes and 
Jerry Voith sank five foul shots 
apiece, and unquestionably these 
counters Were vital in changing the 
complexion of the game. If the lo- 
cals had missed the majority of these 
free tosses, it would have been a sad 
story. 

Having observed the leading bas- 
ketball teams in the Mason-Dixon cir- 
cuit, these players head the list of 
possible All-Maryland candidates. 
Bernie Thobe, Vic Bock and Barney 
Goldberg, Loyola; Harkins, Mounts; 
Bias!, Suffern, and Mogowski, West- 
ern Maryland; Tannebaum, Hopkins; 
McNiff, Samele, and Stevens, Wash- 
ington College. Of course, Witml- 
sky and Oberhaus, Baltimore U. and 
Travis, Maryland, are to be taken in- 
to consideration for All-Maryland ,•'-' 
lection. Off hand, at this point, Ber- 
nie Thobe and Ernie Travis, forwards; 
Vic Bock, center; Franny McNiff and 
Nat Witnitsky, guards would for 
formidable first team. Goldberg and 
Biasi, guards; Tannebaum, c 
Harkins and Stevens, forwards would 
be a strong second team. 

Sports Chatter: In the Greyhound 
game, the boys were "red hot" shoot- 
ing foul shots — it's about time! 

Jim "Rear Admiral" Stevens has 
been a hot potato from the outside — 
Junior is burning the cords! 

Laff of the Week: Carl "Jayvee" 
Biutz (Burts), after the Catholic U. 
tilt, quotes: "This is the worst team 
I've" ever played on." — What do you 
mean, George!! 



New Combination Expected To| 

Better Sho'men Position 

In Conference Race 



This Friday night the Sho'men, fol- 
lowing their 50-47 win over the P. M. 
C. Cadets, journey up to the Western 
end of the State to tackle the Moun- 
taineers. In their last meeting, the. 
Blue and White five upset the locals 
44-41. Playing on their home court, 
the Mounts are tough to beat and the 
Maroons will have to be at their best 
to emerge with a victory. Harkins, 
brilliant captain of the Mounts, will 
be the man to watch along with Jim 
Flood, husky Freshman. 

Then on the following night, the 
locals return to their home environ- 
ment to avenge a previous loss at the 
expense of Delaware. This time the 
Blue Hens will undoubtedly find the 
Maroons a tough bunch. The Blue 
Hens on a small court, laced the lo- 
cals, 37-30. This tilt concludes a 
strenuous week for the Sho'men who 
need to win these games to place 
among the eligible teams in the Mas- 
on-Dixon Loop Playoffs. 



Revised Pentagon 
Downs Cadets By- 
Three Points Here 



Mark Up Two Points For The Flying Dutchmen 



Stevens Replaces Benjamin At 

Center Positions; Adds To 

Scoring Power 

An improved Maroon team, paced 
by Jim (Sure-Shot) Stevens, return- 
ed to the "win column" by virtue of a 
50-47 victory over Pennsylvania Mil- 
itary College in a non-conference 
basketball game at the Armory, Mon- 
day night. Stevens, big gun of the 
game, scored 16 points. Samele gar- 
nered 13 points as did Miller, P. M. 
C. center. 

The game started out as a free- 
scoring affair, with each team tally- 
ing 13 points in the first five minutes. 
Washington slowly pulled out in 
front, to lead 31-24 at the half. P. 
M. C. then threatened by rolling the 
score to 31-29. Jerry Voith sank 
three under-tbe-basket shots to put 
the Maroons again ahead. In the 
closing minutes of the game, the visi- 
tors again threatened but fell short of 
victory. 
P. M. C. G F T 

Barton, f 2 2-2 6 

Wood, f 5 1-1 11 

G. Smith, f 1 4 1-2 9 

Burton, f 0-0 

Miller, c -, 4 5-11 13 

W. Smith, g 2 0-0 4 

Klein, g 2 0-0 4 

Morowski 0-0 

Paff, g 0-0 

Totals 19 9-16 47 

Washington G F T 

Samele, f 5 3-5 13 

Yerkes, f - 4 0-0 8 

Stevens, c 7 2-2 16 

Conant, c 0-0 

McNiff, g 1 0-0 2 

Voith, g 3 0-0 6 

Benjamin, g 2 1-2 5 

Gibe, g 0-0 

Totals 22 6-9 50 





In the two preliminary 
Lambda Chi eked out a 13-11 win o 

er Kappa Alpha and the Soptm ■. ■■ 

blasted the Freshmen 27-9. The in. 
ternity game was a real thriller in (lu- 
second half. K. A. lead 4--' 
half but Lambda Chi soon tool; a .-ub- 
stantial lead. Pete DePnlma sank 
two baskets and Herb Morpini swish- 
ed a long one to bring the score 
11-11. Basil Clark countereii with 
another long one to win the gamo. 
The Sophomores jumped into the lead 
against the Freshmen and wen' ncvoi 
threatened. The victors outsrored 
their opponents 21-7 in the second 
half. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



THE FITCH 
DUSTDOWN CO. 

Janitor Supplies 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Meet Your Class Mates 

— at— 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



Picture show.-; Jim Stevens just as he dropped the ball in 
the basket for a two-pointer for Washington College. Moose 
McNiff and Frank Samele (11) are waiting under the basket 
for the rebound that didn't come. Stevens was high scorer 
with 16 points when the College beat P. M. C. 50-47. 



Leon Henderson has ordered the 
price of gasoline frozen at the No 
vember 7, level. 



D O R F ' S 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 

High Street 



CHESTERTOWN 

BANK 

OF 

MARYLAND 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A complete line supplies plus all texts 
For all classes 




When Away From Home 

Why Not Still Enjoy 

A Home-Cooked 

Meal. 

Our prices are reason- 
able, and if the food or 
service is not satisfactory, 
please tell US. 

Open 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. 

Your Patronage 
Appreciated 

KENT 
GRILLE 

CHESTERTOWN 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



Loyola Breaks 
Sho' Winning 
Streak, 55-43 

Greyhound Big Guns Blast 

Improved Sho'men Quint 

In League Encounter 

Led by Vick Bock, who scored 23 
points from his forward position, 
Loyola College defeated Washington 
College, 55 to 43, Saturday night at 
Evergreen. A packed gymnasiun 
watched the Greyhounds and th' 
Shoremen wage an even battle in the 
first half, but then saw the home team 
puil steadily away in the second. The 
pace was furious all the way. 

Loyola, by its victory, retained first 
place in the Mason-Dixon conference 
and is undefeated in that league, 
piincipal assistants to Bock were 
Bcrnie Thobe, who registered 12 
points and Barney Goldberg who ac- 
counted for eight. But it was Vic 
whose great command of rebounds 
provided the telling" factor of the 

For Washington young Jerry Voith, 
low-headed son of the former Loyola 
player, not only was high-point man 
with 13, but played an excellent all- 
round game as well. Lou Yerkes and 
Frank Samele did very well from the 
free-throw line, each getting five out 
of six. 

Loyola broke into the lead on a 
foul shot by Goldberg and ran its lead 
to 5-0. Washington needed almost 
five minutes to find the range from 
the floor, but half way through the 
>d tied the count at 9-all and 
then went into a four-point lead. The 
Shoremen were not able to hold the 
upper hand very long. Goldberg 
made a set shot and then Tassee pass- 
ed to Thobe for a basket which tied 
the score again at 13-alI. 
Loyola G F T 

F. Bock, f 3 6 

Jock, f 11 1 23 

Nouss, f 10 2 

Thobe, c 5 2 12 

Price, c 

Goldberg, g 3 2 8 

McDonogh, g . 

Glusha'w, g 2 4 

McCulIum, g 



Be Strong 



A Sports Editorial 



Totals 25 5 55 



Washington 
Yerkes, f __ 
Samele, f _1 
Stevens, c _. 
lenjamin, c 
McNiff, g __ 

lentz, g 

Voith, g 

Gibe, c 



Totals , 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



Kent County Savings Bank 

Commercial and Savings 

Accounts 

Member Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 



WILLIAM'S 
Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



I have always contended that 
boys should be strong in body as 
well as in mind. They are like 
twins; they must be inseparable. 
The great need for strong men of 
our nation was brought to light by 
the selective service. As a nation, 
we have grown soft. Now we must 
harden our muscles, strengthen our 
fibres. For in this world of to-day, 
there is no place for a weak nation. 
Events of the recent past have 
proved this. It is shocking, to say 
the least, to learn that more than 
50% of the recent draftees were 
rejected because of physical unfit- 
ness. 

In these critical days, we men 
and women of Washington College 
must make many and many sacri- 
fices. We must prepare ourselves 
to be strong and fit. It is the duty 
of each and everyone of us, young 
and old, to take steps to insure that 



Ed. Note: Coach J. Thomas Kibler 
rved in the A. E. F. during the last 
war and was awarded the Distin- 
guished Service Cross. He reached 
the rank of Captain. 



our bodies will be strong and fit. 
We will be called upon during the 
coming months for many extra du- 
ties. We must be in condition 
mentally and physically for the ex- 
tra assignments. Behind every sol- 
dier or sailor there must be Amer- 
icans physically and mentally equip- 
ped to fight this battle to a finish. I 
urge every boy, every girl, every 
man, every woman to conscienti- 
ously give this matter of physical 
fitness their undivided attention 
and to start now to build their 
bodies stronger so that they can 
meet whatever task might come 
their way. I can assure each stu- 
dent of Washington College he will 
be given every opportunity to make 
his body stronger in his daily ath- 
letic program. 

In conclusion, let me urge one 
and all to start today. 

J. Thomas Kibler. 



J. 5. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



V silt on' s 
Funeral Home, Inc. 



• Phone 72 High St. • 



Graduates Back 
Coaches Words 
On Phy. Ed. 

Commence Today To Harden 

Selves For Future Tasks 

Coach Kibler Urges 



Several of the Washington College 
students who have enlisted in the 
armed forces bear testimony that the 
exercises under the direction of th' 
physical education department are of 
value to them and in some cases, al- 
most a necessity. 

According to a card to Coach 
George Ekaitis from Nelson "Jerry" 
Sohl, who is now a Flying Cadet, ex- 
ercises are the same as those used 
here in football. 

Jerry wrote. "Our physical instruc- 
tor is really tough but our exercises 
are the same as I learned during foot- 
ball — so I am not having any trouble 
with them or him." 

Charlie Fetter, who is at Maxwell 
Field, Alabama, said that many of the 
new flyers there are totally unprepar- 
ed because they lack previous physi- 
cal education. 

Coach Tom Kibler gave the ELM a 
part of Charlie's letter to print. 
"Coach, it's a tough job to change 
from a civilian to a soldier overnight, 
but it can be done. In the little time 
I've been here it has been apparent 
that the life of young Americans in 
the past ten years has left them total- 
ly unprepared for strenuous exercise. 
I only thank God that athletics be- 
came a part of my life at an early 
age. Some of the boys will really 
appreciate the training they received 
from you and the rest of the depart- 
ment at Washington when they get 
into this." 

According to Coaches Kibler and 
Ekaitis, these letters only bear proof 
of what they're attempting to teach 
Washington College students. 



OTIS 

For The HAIRCUT 



WONG LEE 

CHINESE 

LAUNDRY 

317 Cannon St. 

Chestertown, Md. 



I 

* 



Gill's 

Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



Sho'men Defeat 
Cath. U., 43-33 



Washington G F T 

Samele, f 5 8-11 18 

Yerkes, f 0-1 

Juliana, f 0-0 

Benjamin, c 0-1 

Lentz, c 0-0 

Voith, c 1 1-2 3 

McNiff, g 5 1-2 11 

Gibe, g 1 0-0 2 

Stevens, g 3 3-5 

Totals 15 13-22 43 

Catholic U. G F T 

Rice, f 3 1-2 7 

O'Brien, f 3 2-5 8 

Limanek, f 0-2 

Scanlon, c 4 2-4 10 

Sullivan, c 0-0 

Panago, g 1 0-1 2 

Cherelo, g * 1 1-2 3 

Corrado, g 2-2 2 

Baltrukonis, g «__ 1-1 1 

Mercak, g 1 0-0 2 

Totals 13 8-20 33 



Editor's Desk . , 



(Continued from Page 3) 
their work io cooperate with 
them. 

However, we will continue to write 
our column. So until next week, 
from one who knows enough to NOT 
argue with an automobile, so long and 
thirty. 



Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Phone 132W 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors . Buildcn 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campus Ave 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



C0RKHILL 
FRANKS 

ARE GOOD } 
ANYTIME ^ 

Every Time! 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
—For— 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

LBBU. S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MONDAY - TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16-17 
— Every Woman Has Her Weak Moment — 
ROSALIND RUSSELL - WALTER PIGEON 



"DESIGN FOR SCANDAL" 

She was hard-boiled on a Judge's bench 
— but on a park bench — OH, BABY. 

WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY, FEB. 18 - 19 
— Funniest Film In Years — 

"YOU'RE IN THE ARMY NOW" 

— with — 

JIMMY DURANTE - PHIL SILVERS 

JANE WYMAN 

THE NAVY BLUES SEXTETTE 

—Plus — 
LATEST NEWS OF THE DAY 



FRIDAY - SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20-21 

BIG DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM 

GRACIE ALLEN in 

"MR. AND MRS. NORTH" 

—Plus— 
JOHNNY MACK BROWN in 

"FIGHTING BILL FARGO" 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, l <u, 



At Hood College 




President Mead delivered the Mid- 
year Convocation address on Tuesday 
evening at the convocation opening 
the second semester at Hood College. 




On Thursday, February 5, the Sen- 
ior A team beat the Junior Army 
team with a final score of 25-7. The 
same night, the Freshman Red team 
defated the Sophomore Blue team 
7-23. 

The schedule for the rest of the 
season reads as follows: 

February 12 — Senior B vs. Sopho- 
more White; Junior Navy vs. Sopho- 
more White. 

February 17 — Senior A vs. Fresh- 
man White; Junior Army vs. Sopho- 
more White. 

February 19 — Senior A vs. Senior 
B; Sophomore White vs. Freshman 
White. 

February 24 — Junior Navy vs. 
Sophomore Blue; Freshman Red vs. 



Dr. W. H. Moyer 

CHIROPRACTOR 

X-ray Laboraloi-y 

201 Washington Ave. 



MACK'S 




RADIO 




SHOP 


Kent News 


Building 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

Service 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



Freshman White. 

February 26 — Junior Army vs. 
Freshman White; Sophomore White 
vs. Freshman Red. 

March 3 — Senior B vs. Freshman 
Red; Junior Navy vs. Junior Army. 

March 5 — Senior A vs. Freshman 
Red; Junior Army vs. Sophomore 
Blue. 

March 10 — Senior A vs. Junior 
Navy ; Sophomore White vs. Sopho- 
more Blue. 

March 12 — Junior Navy vs. Sopho- 
more White; Sophomore Blue vs. 
Freshman White. 

March 17 — Senior B vs. Junior 
Army; Junior Navy vs. Freshman 
Red. 

March 19 — Senior B vs. Junior 
Navy; Junior Army vs. Freshman 
Red. 

March 24 — Senior A vs. Sophomore 
Blue; Senior B vs. Freshman White. 

March 26 — Senior A vs. Sophomore 
White; Senior B vs. Sophomore Blue. 



0. D. K. Taps , 



{Continued from Page 1) 
deavors is to encourage service. 

After Johnson's speech the actual 
tapping ceremony took place. . Of the 
three who were tapped, Clark and 
Kirby are seniorsrand Jackson is a 
junior. 

Clark is president of the Lambda 
Chi Alpha froternity, belongs to the 
Historical Society, and is one of the 
mainstays on the tennis team. Jack- 
son is a student council representa- 
tive, holds membership in Kappa Al- 
pha fraternity, and has earned varsity 
letters in football and track. Kirby 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 

AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber. Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone 5 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 



COOPERS 



. phone 14 



FOR GOOD, CLEAN 
COAL— 
See— 



fabler's 

Coal Co. 



Distributors Of The 
Famous "Blue Coal" 




is president of the student council, a 
member of Kappa Alpha, and has 
earned varsity letters i nfootball and 
baseball. H.e has been twice named 
to All-Maryland football teams, and 
was co-captain of the College eleven 
this year. 

The next tapping ceremony is sche- 
duled for late April. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration" 
Phone 48 



BARNETT'S 

BARBER SHOP 

BSgPUpstairs Opposite Court 
House. 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



A. S. TURNER & SONS 

The Firestone Store 

—SPORTING GOODS— 

Tennis Racquets, Tennis Balls, Footballs, Basketballs, 

Flashlight Batteries, Electric Light Bulbs 

FILL UP WITH GOOD GULF GASOLINE HERE 

High Street 




Take Her 

Bowling 

Tonite ! 



Why not take her bowling on your date tonight? 
It is an enjoyable and inexpensive way to spend 
an evening, and in the clean, pleasant surround- 
ings of King Pin Alleys you can have a really 
fine time. Make bowling a recreation-habit — 
it will pay dividends in health and fun! 

Opens - Week Days 10 A. M 

Sundays 2 P. M. 

<■<•■> 
We Cater To The 
College Students 



KING PIN BOWLING ALLEY 

Phone 499 for Reservations 




Churchill 

"The Home Of Hit." 
CHURCH HILL . PHONE 2 391 



SAT., MON., TUES., WED 
FEBRUARY 14. 16, 17, 18 







Ass? 



THURS., FRI„ FEB. 19, 20 




RICHARD JEAN 

ARLENond PARKER 

POWER DIVE 




BEGINNING SATURDAY ' 



j;TYR0NE; POWER 
SON of FURY 

" JH« Siory or* 'hinipmih Bhiu 

■ GEjNE T.ERN0 

. GEORGErSSNrJERS • FRANCES F»W» 
1. McDDWALt . .•'■' 

RHYL RT-ZANOCK 



u 



(Seorge TKDlaebmgton'e Birtbfca^ B&itton 





* 



Vol. XLI. No. 19. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1942 



Price Five Cents 



President Mead Claims War 
Is Now Problem Of Strategy 

Washington Felt Education A Basis For Public Happiness 
And Freedom Held By The Individual 



"The present war is no longer a 
problem of war aims, but of war 
strategy. War aims are these : it is 
either our ways and our life, or their 
fonyg and their life. And we are de- 
termined that it will be ours. Our 
centuries of life as colonials and pi- 
oneers have given us something that 
will not be overthrown. We need the 
power and solidity of George Wash- 
ington, the fertility and mind of 
Thomas Jefferson; these great quali- 
ties of mind and spirit and their dis- 
cipline enabled them to establish our 
liberties. Are we great enough to 
iold them?" 

These were the words of Dr. Mead 
at this week's formal convocation. 
held annually the third Thursday in 
February in recognition of George 
rnshington's birthday. Dr. Mead 
dwelt on the great qualities of Wash- 
ington, and translated them logically 
into the present crisis. 

Dr. Mead quoted George Washing- 
ton in one of his public addresses: 
"Knowledge (education) is the short- 
est basis of public happiness, and is 
proportional to the amount of free- 
dom held by the individual." Dr. Mead 
went on to contrast the totalitarian-, 
istic way with the American way, cit- 
ing examples of maltreatment by the 
Germans and Italians in occupied 
lands. 

la his opening words, Dr. Mead 
reminded that the students of Wash- 
ington College have something more 
than any other collegian in the coun- 
try: "George Washington is in your 
blood." Washington is not just a 
textbook story, a shadowy or gigantic 
figure of history, but a real living 
person who thought thoughts which 
>e have inherited. 

The history of the request made by 
Dr. William Smith of George Wash- 
ington that the institution be allowed 
to use his name, and Washington's 
subsequent approval was then re- 
viewed. The founding of our col- 
lege was in a critical time. That war 
*as only the beginning of our trou- 
bles however, for the college has with- 
stood many wars since then. 

Dr. Mead then discussed our posi- 
tion in the present war. Everyone 
knows two things about the present 
conflict: totalitarian determination to 
rule the world its way, and the equal 
determination of democracies to re- 
War aims are now in the past; 
everything depends upon war strat- 
egy. 

If we get careless, we will lose 
our persona] liberties. We are not 
careful but we must be realistic. We 
do not forget Czechoslovakia, Pol- 
and, Norway, Belgium, and the host 
if others. We do not forget parted 
families, destroyed homes, or mass 
executions. But these are not our 

ays." 

Our duty in this present crisis is 
clear: we must justify ourselvfcs. 
first, Dr. Mead stated, we must 
achieve the conquest of discipline ov 
ourselves. Just as the totalitar- 
'anistic peoples have a strong feeling 
for world conquest and enslavement: 




Sciences Seed 
Most Courses 

Heaviest-demanded courses 
for summer school are in chem- 
istry, Spanish, and mathematics, 
according to statistics from the 
questionnaires filled out by 
students this past week. Prob- 
ably two years of education 
will be given in addition to 
these courses. Some adjust- 
ments will have to be made for 
advanced students, however, 
because as Dr. Livingood point- 
ed out, no faculty member will 
be able to offer more than two 
courses. 

It is expected that a consid- 
erable number of elementary 
teachers from the surrounding 
schools will attend summer 
school in order to fulfill their 
requirements for a bachelor of 
science certificate in education, 
to be given by the state. 



GusEisrr W. MeAD Ll.Z>, 



so must we have one for democracy 
and independence. 

The problems confronting us are 
no bigger than were those confront- 
ing Washington in his day; by their 
qualities of mind and spirit and by 
their discipline, those men were able 
to establish our liberties. It is up to 
us to maintain them — to justify our- 
selves. 



Dramatic Club 
Postpones Plays 

Sophomores Finish Rehearsals 
While Seniors Pick A Play 



Washington Elm 
Changes Hands 

Elm Tree Was Once Protected 
By Signs Banning Necking 



After taking a poll of who would 
go home since night classes were ad- 
vanced a night, Henry Mcguire, pres- 
ident of the Dramatic Club, decided 
to postpone the one-act plays one 
week. That is until Friday, Febru- 
ary 27. We hasten to correct the 
Sophomore's play. The name re- 
mains "The Fallen Bough," but, the 
writer is crippled on his wedding day 
by a bough which falls on him. His 
wife, a selfish, unfaithful wretch, act- 
ed by Betty Hill showers her affec- 
tions on a young doctor despite her 
sister's, Lee Lachmore, disapproval. 
When the writer is dying, a great 
physician. Rudy Parks, is called in. 
He, with the family doctor discloses 
the wickedness of Ann, the writer's 
wife. The play has a different end- 
ing for neither the hero nor the he- 
roine live happily ever after. 

The Juniors have found a character 
for the role of editor in their play, 
Don McClellan. Since Bill Roe is 
going to set the world on fire at 
Goucher's Cotillion that week-end, 
Jim Aycock will burn things up here 
in his place. 

When it was asked whether they 
had had any practice as yet the reply 
was "no rehearsal — one soon, maybe 
— it smells anyhow. 

The three characters of the fresh- 
t Continued on Page 6) 



What would be the student's con- 
sternation to some morning find a 
sign forbidding "necking under the 
Washington Elm" hung on its bran- 
ches. Yet once that very thing hap- 
pened. 

In 1928 Miss Ann Smith of the 
local D. A. R. secured a slip of the 
Elm tree that Mrs. James H. Dorsey 
of Baltimore owned. Hers in 
turn had been grown from a slip of 
the original tree under which Wash- 
ington took command of the Ameri- 
can forces, at Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. 

When the tree arrived, Miss Smith 
called Dr. Titsworth who was presi- 
dent of the college at the time and 
asked him to send someone down to 
get it. Dr. Titsworth told "Chief" 
Newton to take a couple of the men 
down with the truck to pick up the 
tree. They returned with a flower 
pot and one small shute. 

All the local dignitaries of the D. 
A. R. were present at the planting; it 
was quite an occasion. What must 
have been their surprise, and for some 
perhaps chagrin, when the next morn- 
ing they found that a fence had been 
built around the inoffensive specimen 
and its branches had been hung with 
signs such as "Woodman, spare this 
tree" and "No necking under this 
tree." 

By 1930 the tree had grown some- 
what and the students were begin- 
ning to think of it as a representa- 
tive symbol of the college. On Octo- 
ber 9, a ballot was circulated among 
the students during Chapel hour. 
Each ballot asked whether the student 
wished the name of the college week- 
ly changed and left a space for a sug- 
gestion. Three names were written 
on the blackboard opposite the origi- 
nal one of "The Collegian." Those 
suggested were — The Washington 
ELM, The Pentagon, and The Flying 
Pentagon. The Washington ELM won 
with a score of 177 votes as against 
(Continued on Page Six) 



Youth Today Are 
Better Prepared 

The Lost Generation Stands 
Amazed At Present Calm 



The youth of today are reacting to- 
ward the present situation with a 
calm quite amazing to the generation 
that went through the first World 
War. Dr. Mead, in his address to the 
Historical Society Wednesday even- 
ing explained how the conflict now 
was not such a "terrific shock" as was 
the one in Nineteen Seventeen. Dur- 
ing the last war there was no radio to 
inform the general public of current 
events; today one cannot listen to the 
radio for any reasonable period and 
escape the news. "Even Horace 
Heidt would be interrupted if some- 
thing of world-shattering importance 
happened." 

It was not until ten years after the 
close of the last war that Lindburg 
flew the Atlantic. Now pilots ferry 
planes back and forth across the 
ocean between meals. 

Dr. Mead expressed genuine hap- 
piness in the fact that the present 
generation has been reared during a 
period of depression. He has escap- 
ed that "unfortunate prosperity" 
which created the jazz age and the 
rah-rah boys. It is not like that one 
— "a lost generation." 

In conclusion, Dr. Mead predicted 
that there would not be "a lost gen- 
eration" after this war as the youth 
have been better prepared for it than 
were the youth of Nineteen Seventeen. 
He further suggested that the armed 
services soon might be drafting boys 
"out of uniform back into college and 
industry." 



Four Men Sign 
In U.S.N.R. V-7 

Lieutenant Chatard and Chief 
Yeoman Medford, U. S. N., signed up 
one student completely and three oth- 
ers all except parental consent, un- 
der the Navy V-7 plan Wednesday 
during their visit here. 

In addition, they held interviews 
with about two dozen more students, 
some of whom are very much inter- 
ested in the ordnance department. 

These officers formerly were in 
chaige of recruiting men from water- 
front towns, but have lately begun to 
visit colleges. Previous to their trip 
here, they attended Mount St. Mary's, 
where they met with about the same 
luck. 

Albert Mooney was completely 
signed up under the V-7 provision, 
and Michael Alteri, Paul Ruark, and 
John Williams, Jr., have completed 
everything except obtaining their 
parents' consent. 



THIS WEEK'S EDITOR 

The editor-in-chief of this 
week's issue of the ELM is 
Molly Blackwood who is a can- 
didate for the 1942-'43 editor- 
ship. Other candidates for the 
position are Jim Aycock, Leon- 
ard Parris and Phyllis Peters. 



Dr. G. W. Sutton 
Shows Paintings 

Science Society Will Hold 
Exhibit Next Week 



Forty-one original paintings by Dr. 
George M. Sutton, ornithologist of 
Cornell University, will be exhibited 
under the auspices of the Society of 
Sciences from Monday, February 23, 
through Saturday. March 14, in the 
Museum Room on the second floor of 
the Bunting Library, it was announc- 
ed today by James Diaeumakos, pres- 
ident of the Society. 

The water-eolors and oil on exhibit 
comprise an unusual one man show, 
for Dr. Sutton enjoys an internation- 
al reputation as a bird artist, explor- 
er, author, and lecturer. Certain of 
the paintings of arctic birds and ani- 
mals were made on Southampton Is- 
land at the mouth of Hudson Bay 
when, Dr. Sutton spent a year living 
with the Eskimos and making a bio- 
logical survey of that island. Other 
subjects include the famous pileated 
woodpecker of the Louisiana swamps, 
our own Baltimore oriole, and an in- 
teresting variety of wild ducks. 

Dr. Julian D. Corrington will speak 
on Dr. Sutton and his work at the 
next meeting of the Society of Sci- 
ences on Wednesday, March 4. This 
will be an open meeting to which all 
students are invited. 



ODK Key Wins 
Approval Here 

Final Plans Undertaken To 
Award Keys 



Plans for an ODK recognition kep 
will come up for discussion, probably 
at the next meeting of the organiza- 
tion. The Society of Sciences, the 
last of the clubs to vote on the mat- 
ter, approved the key at its meeting 
on Wednesday night. 

The purpose of the key is to re- 
ward all those students who are out- 
standing in extra-curricular activi- 
ties, "individual recognition will be 
made of the three major fields of stu- 
dent activities, — scholarship, ath- 
letics, and extra-curricular activities. 

Rufus Johnson, chairman of the 
committee in charge of the key has 
devised a list of the exact require- 
ments an applicant must pass to be- 
come eligible. The result has been a 
division of all extra-curricular activ- 
ities into five groups, publications, 
administration, music, drama and 
forensics, and organizations and so- 
cieties, two of which fields an appli- 
cant must participate in before be- 
ing able to apply. 

According to Johnson, one of the 
good features of this plan is that the 
award is available to all, upperclass- 
men and underclassmen, men and 
women. Heretofore, women students 
had only the Sigma Sigma Omieron 
key for scholarship as recognition of 
merit in any field. The maltese crops 
will become as standardized as the 
Varsity "W" and will be coveted as 
a symbol of outstanding work and 
leadership. 



The United States consumes about 
60 million pounds of black pepper a 
year the bulk of which comes from 
Malaya. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20 1., 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except' 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty! 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution) 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 



SPOTLIGHTING WASHINGTON— by Robert L. Swain, Jr., '37 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 

This Week's Editor . . • Molly Blackwood 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Guest Cartoonist Robert L. Swain, Jr. 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



Member 

Associated CbUe6iate Press 

Distributor of 

Cblle6iateDi6est 



National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 
4ZO Madison Ave New York. n.Y 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1942 



What Of Washington? 

The birthday we are celebrating this week-end should 
make us all stop and think. It means more than a two day hol- 
iday to break the long grind ahead of us all. It means that we 
are paying homage to a man who was faced with a problem very 
like our own, except that he did not have the great nation be- 
hind him that we have now. 

George Washington was a great part of that small army 
which was withstanding an attack on principles and rights 
which our forefathers felt were theirs. We are, or soon will be 
a small part of that great army which again is protecting our 
rights and our very existence. George Washington was con- 
fronted by great difficulties,— lack of equipment, shortage of 
food, no hospitalization or medical aid, an insufficient number 
of men. Though we have more to contend with than Washing- 
ton, we have more materials and men in proportion to our task. 

As Dr. Mead commented in his talk to the Historical Socie- 
ty, we have had a slower build up for the situation of today than 
did our fathers for the last war or our forefathers for the Revo- 
lution. 

Now that our very shores have been threatened, we should 
think more seriously than ever of George Washington and the 
democracy that he helped us to found and preserve. 







<SoL. TENCH TILGNAfAN. 
FAMOUS AS THE FIRST TO INFORM 
CONGRESS OF THE END OF THE 
REWLVr/0N> 
GAYE DR. SMITH 

msH/mroM 

RROAVSE OF 

SO GUINEAS 




K/ASHINGTON s 

rlEADGUMRTEKS AT NEWBUROH, N.Y.,-N(W A SHRINE. ..HERE WE 
GENERAL WROTE DR.WILLI/W SMITH H LETTER. GIY/I/O Hilt HIS PERSONAL 
CONSENT TO CRLL"THE COLLEGE AT CHESTER" BY HIS NAME-... 
WASHINGTON COLLEGE IS THE FIRST EOOCATIONM INSTITUTION AND THE n 
ONLY COLLEGE TO BE/IK tmSHINGTON^ NAME WITH HIS PERMI5V0N" 



Exclusive To The ELM. 

Robert L. Swain, Jr., '37, has graciously drawn this cartoon 
for the ELM commemorating Washington's birthday. Since 
Bob's graduation as a History major, he has been the cartoonist 
for the Wilmington Journal - Every Evening, and he has con- 
tributed work to other newspapers and magazines. He has 
compiled two historical pamphlets for Washington College. 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



US 



WE'RE IN THE 
DRAFT NOW!!* 

About fifty per cent of thosi 
ington College fellows who ha 
registered for military service 
viously have done so now, M, 
them registered with their home dn 
boards though the actual registrar 
took place here in Chestertown, 

Much to the surprise of » oni( 
few, they weren't even asked | e 
take a physical examination 
er Saturday or Monday. N« 
were they measured for 
form*. It seems as though 
felt they were slighted. 
The draft for twenty-yea 
have one advantage howevc: 
made so many more Ameri 
conscious. Not only that, 
made many of them realize to a j>re 
er extent that much of the rcspott 
bility for the preservation of Ai 
can ideals in their hands, 
they're singing these days, "We' 
the draft, now." 

GET TO THE 
BOTTOM OF IT 

The other day, after we wrote o 
column about the Freshmen failing 
speak, we were talking to Coa 
George Ekaitis. Coach has the n 
answer to this fault. The fault 
with the upper-classmen and not t 
freshmen. 

When Freshmen come to < 
lege, it is a new experience 
them and they naturally look to 
the upper-classmen for the ex- 
ample. It is obvious that if the 
upper-classman doesn't speak, 
the freshman is not going to take 
it upon himself to do so. 
And so it seems as though the i 
per-classmen have a constant duty 
which most of them are unaiva 
Freshmen are watching us consti 
ly. Using us as examples and iloi 
as we do. Perhaps it is a bit late 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Washington was not unfamiliar 
with Chestertown before his visit to 
accept an honorary degree of laws 
from our college, the only college 
bearing Washington's name with his 
permission. On many of his trips 
northward to Philadelphia and New 
York from his luxurious home. Mount 
Vernon, he crossed the Chesapeake 
Bay to Rock Hall in Kent County and 
continued to Chestertown. On these 
trips he stayed in an elegant two- 
story porched house, Widehall. You 
probably have noticed this mansion, 
now framed by willows, on the bank 
of the Chester to the left of the 
bridge. 

The only higher institution of 
learning in Chestertown then was the 
high school. A friend of Benjamin 
Franklin, Reverend William Smith, 
"father of colleges", came to Ches- 
tertown from the Academy of Phila- 
delphia and succeeded in raising the 
high school to a college in 1782. Of 
the many prominent men whom he 
interested in the enterprise was Gen- 
eral George Washington. Washing- 
ton contributed fifty guineas from 
which Dr. Smith purchased an air- 
pump and some optical instruments as 
the beginning of a philosophical ap- 
paratus. He also contributed his 
name and wrote to Dr. Smith, "I am 
much indebted for the honor confer- 
red on me by giving my name to the 
college at Chester." This struggling 
infant college did not allow Wash- 
ington to withdraw from them. He 
was made a member of the board of 
visitors and governors, June 24, 
1782. Although he remained a mem- 
ber of the board until his election to 



George Washington, The Benefactor Of Our College 



by Frances Goodwin 



presidency in 1789, he only attended 
one meeting and had little connection 
with the management of our college 
as proved by one of his letters answ- 
ering a citizen's request. It stated, 
"Not having any agency with the col- 
lege that bears my name — who wants 
an instructor in the French lang- 
uage — ". 

When Washington visited our col- 
lege in 1784, the students enacted a 
tragedy based upon the life of Gusta- 
vus Vasa, the deliverer of Sweden 
from Danish oppression. The play, 
given under the same elms now back- 
ed by the boys dorms, characterized 
liberty, heroism, and public spirit. 
"The latter part of which, calling the 
more immediate attention of the aud- 
ience to their favorite here, in whose 
presence it was spoken, drew tears of 
gratulation from every eye and re- 
peated bursts of applause from every 
heart." Some of the stirring lines of 
the last part spoken by William Hems- 
ley were: 



"To rouse the slumbering virtue of 
the free 

To fire the breast of deeds of pub- 
lic worth 

And call the impatient soul of 
glory forth — 



hope and fear 

We humbly dar'd to greet your can- 
did ear 

To bid heroic ages roll anew, 

And call the great Gustavus back 
to view. 

On awful grace, the mighty Chief 
appears 

From his deep Slumber of some 
Hundred Years — 

A Race of hardy northern Sons he 

led, 
Guiltless of Courts, untainted and 

unread; 
Whose inborn Spirits spurn'd the 

ignoble Fee, 
Whose Hands scorn'd Bondage — 

for their Hearts were free — 
How late did fell Oppression, o'er 

this Land, 
With more than Danish Fury raise 

her hand; 
When lo! a Hero of immortal 

Name 
From where Potowmack rolls his 

mighty stream, 
Arose the Champion of his Coun- 
try's Cause, 
The Friend of Mankind, Liberty 

and Laws. 



When the play ended, Dr. Smith, 
pointing to Washington, cried, "Be- 
hold the Gustavus of America." 

The first commencement of Wash- 
ington College is remembered for the 
For this, to night, with troubling graduation of four men, but the 



greatest commencement, that in 1789, 
is remembered for the presentation 
of an honorary degree of laws to a 
man commanding the strange title — 
"President of the United States." In 
his acceptance speech he expressed, 
"It affords me peculiar pleasure to 
know that the seat of learning under 
your direction hath attained to such 
proficiency in the sciences since the 
peace; and I sincerely pray the Great 
Author of the universe may smile up- 
on the institution and make it an ex- 
tensive blessing to this country." 

Washington who deserved and re- 
ceived these honors was really a typi- 
cal man living according to the style. 
He, "danced, played cards for small 
stakes, swore on occasions, made 
home brew," and like most men ad- 
mired a pretty face. Washington, 
the athlete, the expert horseman, the 
good sport, the duel surveyor and 
planter never went to college, but be- 
lieved in it as has been shown. He 
planned for a national university and 
even set aside a portion of his for- 
tune for its endowment. 

Let us look around our campus to- 
day in search of the many remem- 
brances of Washington. Down be- 
fore the boy's donatories is a young 
tree taken in 19 — as a seedling from 
the Washington Elm in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, under which Washing- 
ton took command of the Continental 



li 



Army in 1775. From William Si 
Hall, "at night a beacon light shin 
out from the cupola which is v 
for miles around, symbolizing 
friendly service and the intellect 
illumination which Washington Ci 
lege has given to the state." Wl" 
one's attention is drawn to the pres 
buildings, his curiosity is aroused 
bout the first ones of Washingt 
College. The first structure wai 
feet long, 53 feet high, and hous 
the lecture, dining, living and slee 
ing rooms of the men and thf 
schoolmasters. Forty-five years 1st 
it burned and not for fifteen y^ 
was a new building, Middle Ha 
erected. It was a "decade of stru 
gle" suffered by only one facul 
member, Richard Ringgold, the pf 
ident whose name is inscribed on t 
corner stone of Middle Hall. 
must not forget Reid Hall, the W> 
en's dormitory, remodelled in ' 
after the style of Mount Vernon. 
Another great man, like Presld' 
Washington, received an honon 
degree of law from Washington C 
lege — President Roosevelt in ^ 
Roosevelt on his journey to Ch< 



town followed the same route 



fffl 



ington had taken 144 years 



befo. 
He was seated at the commenced 
in an armchair, once the property 
the first president. In his embos-' 
leather folder containing his own 
ploma was a photastatic copy 
Washington's degree. 

Our college, the only college t 
ing Washington's name with his 
sent is proud to have had his supp 
in its founding and to have honoi 
him several times. 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



THIS WEEK'S- 



PERSONALITY 



ON THE CAMPUS 



Could the campus ever forget this 
week's personality, Dave Bartolini? 
Tall, dark, and rather rugged, and a 
conscientious worker, to say nothing 
of being crowned the first Mr. Wash- 
ington College. 

Dave is one of our Connecticut 
Iiovh — born in Waterbury, September 
7, 1915. When asked what grammai 
.uhool he attended, he said, "a little 
country school house with four class- 
es in one room" — the school had a 
name, a very high-sounding name of 
Buck's Hill Grammar School. H' 
boasts being graduated from tht 
"city" school though — Hopeville 
Grammar where he was president of 
Hie senior class. He was also presi- 
dent of his senior class at Crosby 
High, and at graduation he was 
awarded the American Legion Medal 
of Honor — a reward for scholarship 
and athletics. Dave received j 
pointment to the Naval Academy, but 
he prefers to skip the particulars why 
lie didn't follow it up. 

Dave's college career began four 
years later when he received a merit 
scholarship and an athletic scholar- 
ship to Washington. To continue his 
tiestiny of being president of somi 
thing or another, he was elected pre 
klent of his class and has held this 
nthce every year. As for sports he 
has participated in every branch, ev- 
en to ping-pong to a certain extent, 
and in his Sophomore year was elect- 
ed into the Varsity club of which he 
was president in his Senior year. Due 
tu a knee injury lie was forced to re- 



PAGE THREE 



Washington's Birthday Reminds 

The College Of Noble Heritage 

The Spirit Of George Washington Inspires All Graduates As 
They Leave The College Halls 




Dave Bartolii 



tire from active athletics and acted 
as assistant coach of football and bas^ 
ketball. Dave is president of his fra 
ternity, K. A. and is also a member ul 
0. D. K. It is plain to see why ht 
was selected for "Who's Who In 
American Colleges and Universities' 
this year. 

Dave's ambition is typical — to 
coach and teach but at present it 
looks like IA in the Army foh him. 
He's a born leader and who knows — 
maybe he'll be president of the U. S. 
At least we'll be able to say we knew 
him when — 



-- Where Were You? - 



We hope that everybody remem- 
bered to give up something for Lent 
— and then didn't forget what it was 
that they gave up! Storm was on 
the campus for a day this week. It 
seems like the army has a way with 
people! Gayle was back for a few 
'lays prior to leaving for training. 
Bob — why use lemon juice? Ever 
heard of a pencil? By-the-by, open 
your eyes when you come through a 
door. 

Reid Hall, in some measure receiv- 
ed its spring talk — all smooching is to 



be done before you reach the Hall — 
hear? Frank is still up to his usual 
tricks — jokes. 

We hear that Doc Jones is mixing 
pleasure with business in Math 6. 
Couldn't be spring fever, huh Wa? 

Reid Hall was a little chilly the 
other morning — seemed to be exces- 
sive ventilation through the front 
door — anybody know anything about 
it? 

And what's this about a new jive 
gang soon to draw its first breath and 
root it's first toot? 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



(Continued from Page 2) 
'he year but it is a good idea to keep 
in mind. 

THIS 'N' THAT 
HERE N' THERE 

The other day we tried to get a bus 
to take a group of enthusiasts to the 
Western Maryland game. From a 
student stand-point, the idea was 
good. A sufficient number of them 
wanted to go and cheer the team on. 
Student support might have made a 
difference in the game. 

However, we checked up with 
local authorities and found that 
it would cost at least seventy- 
five dollars to charter a bus to 
Westminster and then it would 
only accommodate about thirty 
passengers. Of course, it was 
out of the question. 
Perhaps in the future, if the Rot- 
a ry Club's attempt to secure train 



service for Chestertown is successful 
students will be able to attend many 
Of the "away" games at a reasonable 
cost. Then the students will be do- 
ing their honest duty toward the 
team. 

BY MOLLY 
BLACKWOOD 

This week's ELM is edited by one 
of the Junior contestants for next 
year's editorship — Molly Blackwood. 
Molly has done the job thoroughly 
and completely without aid from the 
Senior Board or editor. She is to be 
judged upon her work. 

Next week's ELM will also be 
edited by Molly so if you are 
one of those who wishes to see 
her next year's editor, give her 
your cooperation. The two weeks 
following Molly's reign will be 
given over to Jimmy Aycock. 
Our job on this paper now is pure- 
ly advisory and only as a correspond- 
ent. To be only a correspondent and 
to keep "hands off" the editing func- 
tions is a. very hard job. But it's the 
only fair way to determine who is the 
most capable of being editor. 

From one who ALWAYS has 
to make a telephone call twice to 
get an aniwer — so long and 
thirty. J. C. J. 



Why should Washington Colle; 
find February 22nd so significant? 
What connection is there between 
George Washington and our Alma 
Mater? 

To say that the Father of our 
Country received an honorary degree 
from Washington College as well as 
donated fifty guineas to the cause, 
would be nothing new. To state that 
this college was established in 1782 
and thus possesses the tenth oldest 
collegiate charter in the United 
States, is an exhausted assertion. To 
boast that this institution is the only 
school that has the honor of having 
received the personal consent of 
Washington to name the "College at 
Chester" for him, is also trite. These 
affirmations serve only to arouse 
from most of us a cynical, "So what?" 
So what? Well, those one hundred 
and sixty years of existence have left 
us with more than worn brick pave- 
ments and aged picturesque trees. 
Those years of struggle and decades 
of toil have given us something other 
than historical documents for our re- 
cords, or alluring statements for our 
catalog. Yes, that century and a 
half of progress has not only present- 
ed us with an outstanding alumni and 
a credible heritage. Something has 
grown out of such a history— some- 
thing that can not be touched tior 
photographed. It is the spirit — the 
Life of Washington College. 

It is this spirit that puts an invisi- 
ble yet definite stamp on each stu- 
dent. The spirit of Washington Col- 
lege, although intangible, is so much 
a part of each person in these Halls 
of Education that it is impossible to 
graduate without it. 

It is not by accident that Washing- 
ton College possesses such spirit. In 
a logical order of events, that result 
was inevitable. 

Why? Because along that rough 
road of years the ultimate goal of 
Washington College has been to hon- 
or the name that George Washington 
bore. To preserve and revere that 
great name has been the stimulating 
element by which our college has cul- 
tivated' such undying spirit and reach- 
ed such marked prominence. 

That endeavor to keep Washing- 
ton's name unmarred has been suc- 
cessful beyond a doubt. Such suc- 
cess is indeed honorable. To follow 



Meet Your Class Mates 

— at— 

LeCATES BROS. 

BARBER SHOP 

Cross Street 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



Dr. W. H. Moyer 

CHIROPRACTOR 
X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 



the example of a man as outstanding 
and noble as George Washington is 
extreme commendable. To have such 

a worthy ambition — and better yet 

to fulfill that ambition, is a valuable 
accomplishment. 

February 22nd is the birthday of 
this great man. Let's celebrate his 
two hundred and tenth birthday in 
appreciation of his gift. We are in a 
position not only to revere him be- 
cause he was the Father of our Coun- 
try but also because of a more per- 
sonal reason — he gave us a name, and 
consequently an extremely reputable 
purpose to strive for; because, 

"Just as Washington was foremost, 
Both in honor and peace and war, 
So our College is foremost ever, 
To honor the name that he bore." 



NOTE 

The cartoon on page 2 was made 
possible through the courtesy of 
the Engraving Department of the 
Wilmington Journal-Every Even- 
ing. 




When Away From Home 

Why Not Still Enjoy 

A Home-Cooked 

Meal. 

Our prices are reason- 
able, and if the food or 
service is not satisfactory, 
please tell US. 

Open 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. 

Your Patronage 
Appreciated 

KENT 
GRILLE 

CHESTERTOWN 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



The Washington College 
BOOKSTORE 

A complete line supplies plus all texts 
For all classes 




lake Her 

Bowling 

Tonite ! 



Why not take her bowling on your date tonight? 
It is an enjoyable and inexpensive way to spend 
an evening, and in the clean, pleasant surround- 
ings of King Pin Alleys you can have a really 
fine time- Make bowling a recreation-habit — 
it will pay dividends in health and fun! 

Opens - Week Days 10 A. M 

Sundays 2 P. M. 

<> ♦ <■ 
We Cater To The 
College Students 



KING PIN BOWLING ALLEY 

Phone 499 for Reservations 




Sport T]foe 



Kllii Section 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM CHESTERTOWN, MD., 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2n 



Kardash 's 
Corner 



Last Tuesday night in the new, 
spacious Gill Gym, home court of the 
Tenors, the Sho'men bowed lo West- 
ern Maryland, 44-40. Seeking their 
fourth consecutive win, the Maroons 
frowned on several glorious oppor- 
tunities for victory. With two min- 
utes remaining, the score 42-40, the 
locals missed three foul shots and 
three dribbling-into-the-basket shots. 
Then with a minute and a half to go, 
the Green and Gold Terrors fired 
three successive shots through the 
hoop to garner the win. 

It'i been customary for Westeri 
Maryland for the past two years t< 
repeat its recent effort. In 1940-41 
the Terrors nosed out the local* ir 
the two season games and in the ini 
tial playoff tilt, administered the fina 
blow to Sho' hopes. "if" the Ma 
roon shots had been dropping, ii 
would have been a different story 
Tuesday night. Frankie Samele, 
however, displayed a sensational 
brand of shooting, the little forward 
tossed in baskets from all angles for 
grand total of 20 points. 

Most likely, Maroon followers have 
their glances cast toward the coming 
playoffs, with the Sho'men looming 
as the "Darkhorse." Surging up- 
ward in the past several weeks with 
three successive wins over P. M. C, 
Mount St. Mary's and Delaware, re- 
spectively, the Sho'men possess a re- 
cord of four wins and six losses. Cath- 
olic U. and Loyola have yet to be 
played, but winning over the Grey- 
hounds will prove mighty difficult to 
do. Thus, the present season's re- 
cord for the Maroons will probably 
stand at five wins and seven 



Sho'men Meet Camp Lee Five Here; 
Visitors Predicted To Be Troublesoitii 



Service Outfit Has A Fine 

Record In Its Encounters 

With College Teams 



With the Mason-Dixon Loop wan- 
ing toward the playoffs, Loyola; 
Washington, Western Maryland, Mt. 
St. Mary's, Delaware and Hopkins, ac- 
cording to the wiseacres should be the 
final league standings. But, as in 
the American League, Loyola stands 
out like the Yankees and the rest of 
teams are lost, in the shuffle. Un- 
questionably, the Maroons have th< 
fastest offensive attack in the loo; 
with Loyola second. Western Mary 
land, beyond a doubt, has the slowest 
moving attack. 

Captain "Moose" McNiff has been 
the main factor in the recent Marc 
splurge. "Mac", in the Western 
Maryland tilt, snared rebounds from 
under both baskets and along with Sa- 
mele was sensational in the Mount St. 
Mary's and Delaware games. McNiff 
if he had his "Irish-Up" all the time, 
would be a "wiz2" on the court. He 
can shoot, dribble and pass compara- 
ble to any man in the State. 

It is interesting to note that the 
relative position of the teams in the 
final loop standings will mean quite a 
bit to gate attendance. The games 
will probably again be played at 
Homewood Gym, Baltimore. The 
first eight teams will be included in 
the struggle for the loop crown. One 
defeat drops a team out of the chase. 
Barring a stunning upset, similar to 
last year's loss at the hands of a fight- 
ing Western Maryland, Loyola should 
easily cop the gonfalon. 

SPORT BITS— "Moose" McNiff, af- 
ter having committed three fouls in 
the first half of the Western Mary- 
land game, played the whole second 
half cleanly — nice work, "Moose" . . . 
Frank Samele is "Boiling" over his 
last season's scoring record — He's 
an (n) ace! . . . Maroons were going 
like a house afire until the Terrors 
came along — An old flame never dies! 



The Pentagon had a three- 
game win streak as it faced Western 
Md. at Westminster lastTucsdaynight 
and in spite of the fact that the Ter- 
ors were heavy favorites to cut the 
ictory spree of the Shoremen short, 
Coach Fred Dumschott is well pleased 
vith the improvement of his cagers in 
recent games. 

The Dutchmen play for the home 
folks again tomorrow night when they 
oppose the strong Camp Lee five. The 
service outfit, composed almost en 
tirely of former collegiate cagers, ha 
had a fine record against college foe 
and will likely prove plenty of trou 
ble for the Shoremen. 

Largely responsible for Washing- 
ton's upward spurt in recent games 
has been the improved performanci 
of Jim Stevens. Always a potential 
star and flashing great form' in spots 
in almost every game, Stevens has 
been very inconsistent. Shifted to 
center and assigned to playing out- 
side on the offensive, Stevens has 
found himself and as he has improv- 
ed so has the rest of the team. 

Stevens is" a natural for outside 
play. He has a fine eye for the bas- 
ket at long range and if a guard is 
foolish enough to crowd him he can 
use his great speed to go by for a 
close-up crack at the basket. 

Also contributing in a large meas- 
ure to the Shoremen's improved play 
has been the insertion of young Jerry 
Voith into the starting lineup. Still 
a little crude and green the youngster, 
nevertheless, is a winner all the way, 
plays hard throughout and comes 
through in the tight spots. 

The combination of McNiff, Sa- 
mele, Yerkes, Voith and Stevens is 
the best the Sho'men has shown to 
date. 



Sho'men Atone 
Earlier Defeat 
To Blue Hens 



MACK'S 

RADIO 

SHOP 

Kent News Building 



The second Mason-Dixon Confer 
ence victory in as many nights was 
chalked up by Dutch Dumschott's cag- 
ers here on Saturday night at the ex- 
pense of the University of Delaware. 
The score was 50-40, and the win 
atoned for an earlier season loss at 
Newark to the Blue Hens. 

Delaware held a 6-2 lead soon af- 
ter the game started but Washington 
got started and was away to a 10 
point lead at one time, midway of the 
half. The letdown that has come to 
be a part of the Shoremen's play in 
the final minutes of the opening ses- 
sion enabled Delaware to creep up 
and finish the half only two points 
behind, 28-26. 

Washington took command again 
as the second half was underway and 
gradually added to its advantage, fin- 
ishing ten points ahead of their pen- 
insula rivals. 

Jim Stevens and Jerry Voith grab- 
bed the scoring honors but field goals 
by McNiff and Samele, at timely 
points in the game, were highly bene- 
ficial to the Washington cause. 



Dutchmen Beat Mt. St. Mary's By 
37-34 Score In League Victoi 



The Flying Pentagon led most ol 
the way last Friday night at Emmits- 
burg to turn the tables on Mt. St. 
Mary's and score an upset Mason- 



OTIS 

For The HAIRCUT 



C0RKHILL 
FRANKS 

ARE GOOD 
ANYTIME 

Every Time! 



For those little things 
you are always needing 
in your room and for 
dress — 

Stop in at — 

FOX'S 

5c to $1.00 Store 



For that 

"Esquire look" . . . 

buy your clothes 
. . . and furnishings at 

LeeCl S in Baltimore 

15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 




"Moose" McNiff 



Dixon Conference basketball victory 
The final score was 37-34. 

Washington jumped away to an 
early lead that reached a ten-point 
advantage as the first half waned. Mt. 



St. Mary's spurted and closed 
gap, finishing the period only f 
points in the ruck. 

The second half was a 
tuck battle with Mt. St. Mary's 
ing the better of the argument 
single counter, which left the 
staters three shy of catching 
Shoremen. 

The Washington five, impiovioj 
recent games, was the underdog 
the encounter because of an tti 
season win for the Mounts here 
the fact that the odds are all for 
home club on the miniature court 
Emmitsburg. 

Moose McNiff led the way for 
scorers on the Washington q^ 
with the point-getting being more 
enly distributed than usual. 



■l'i 



WONG LEE 

CHINESE 
LAUNDRY 

317 Cannon St. 
Chestertown, Md. 



Read the ELM 




Have fun -be friendly 

Treat yourself and 

others to fresh-tasting 

Wrigley's Spearmint Gum 

The Flavor Lasts 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE FIVE 



GIRLS' 

SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



The Sophomore Whites have coi 
((IJ f of the last two games as the win-. 
s, Thursday a week ago — no 
11: .-■. were played last night because 
of classes — they trounced the Senior 

train with an eight point lead at the 
Lj e of the game; the final score wiu 
Hill. Tuesday night, they secured 
Iheiv chances of pluying in the sec- 
ond round by defeating the Junior 
Army team. 

The Junior Navy team, on lost 
Thursday night, upheld their cham- 
pionship title in a 40-4 victory over 
the Freshman White team. Their 
iunter with the Freshman Red 
tenia should prove a more interesting 
one, as that team has the three for- 
wards who will be a threat to any up- 
|)t>j -classmen's varsity position. 

Tho Senior A team, which has a 
tood chance of winning the champion- 
ship honors this year, defeated the 
Freshman White team by 12 points on 
Tuesday night with a final score of 
10-4. 



Bill Nicholson 
Off To Camp 

Bill Nicholson was among the 23 
Chicago Cub players set to leave that 
ity this evening on the North West- 
ern Union Pacific streamliner, City 
of Los Angeles, on the first leg of the 
trip to Catalina Island for the Cub 
training period. 

A total of 40 players, the largest 
in cither major league, are scheduled 
to appear at the Wilmington docks on 




Friday morning to set sail on the 
Cabrillo, No. 3 ship in the Wrigley- 
Catalina fleet, for the 22 miles across 
the Pacific to the island training 
camp, 

The Cubs will train until March 13 
whoa they begin an exhibition tour 
fl games on 31 days, starting with 
the White Sox at Los Angeles and 
ending with the same club at Comis- 
key Park on April 12. 



Gibe Chalks Up Two Points For Sho'men 




Three former Washington College 
athletes, all in uniform, were in the 
stands as the Shoremen topped Dela- 
ware in basketball Saturday night. 
They were Lt. Joe McLain, who is at! 
Edgewood; Corporal Addis Copple,| 
who is at Aberdeen and Pvt. Bill Col- 1 
lins, who is at Fort Meade. 

J. Ernest Shockley, "40, has just 
received a commission as Ensign in 
the U. S. Naval Air Corp. He will bej 
called immediately for special train- 
in the photographic service. 



— Photo courtesy Transcript. 

Picture shows Gibe scoring to build up the Sho'men score 
in a 50-40 defeat of the Delaware team on the home court 
Saturday night. 



Blue And Drab 
Home On Leave 



Gibby Young, former Washington 
College athlete, is among the latest 
to answer the call of Uncle Sam. Gib- 
by, who has been in Elkton since 
graduation, first as a teacher, then as 

munitions worker, has signed up 
with the Marines and reported to 
Parris Island, South Carolina, for 
ic training. 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 



JONES & SATTERFIELD 

Paints, Hardware and 

Farm Machinery 

Chestertown Phone 51 



D O R F ' S 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 

High Street 



KENT COUNTY 

FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Phone 173 



THE FITCH 
DUSTDOWN CO. 

Janitor Supplies 

Baltimore, Maryland 



HAD AWAY GROCERY 
Meats and Vegetables 

Phone 37 
Cross Street, Chestertown 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



HOLT OIL COMPANY 

Tydol - Veedol Products 
Chestertown, Maryland 



SCHUMACHER & SEILER, 

INC. 

Wholesaler! of 

Plumbing - Heating Materials 

Baltimore, Maryland 



Fulton Grand 
Laundry Co. 

Finer Grade Launderers : 
Baltimore, Md. 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
— For — 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 





PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 


PAINT 

for EVERY need 

"Time- Tested Products" 

The Glidden Company 

21 N. Liberty Street 

Baltimore, Maryland. 




E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 


CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration" 
Phone 48 


LIGHT... 

...POWER 

From 

Chestertown 
Electric Light 
and Pc yer Co. 

. . . Phone 333 




The First 
National Bank 




CHESTERTOWN 

BANK 

OF 

MARYLAND 




' Patronize Our Advertisers 



A. S. TURNER & SONS 

The Firestone Store 

—SPORTING GOODS— 

Tennis Racquets, Tennis Balls, Footballs, Basketballs, 

Flashlight Batteries, Electric Light Bulbs 

FILL UP WITH GOOD GULF GASOLINE HERE 

High Street 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., FEB. 23-24-25 

— America's Most Heroic Adventure — 

ERROL FLYNN - OLIVIA DeHAVILLAND 

— in — 

"THEY DIED WITH THEIRBOOTSON" 

Thundering at you out of History's 
Heart. The fiercest chapter in the gallant 
fight for America's frontier. The story of 
Custer's gallant 7th Cavalry. 

THUR. - FRI. - SAT., FEBRUARY 26-27-28 

Beery's Best In A Picture To Thrill Every 
American 

WALLACE BEERY 
— in — 

"THE BUGLE SOUNDS" 

— with — 

MARJORIE MAIN 

LEWIS STONE - GEORGE BANCROFT 

Beery's in the Tank Corps now, in a 
mighty service drama. Filmed in co-oper- 
ation with the U. S. Army. 




PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20 



1°: 



The Mount Vernon Literary Socie- 
ty is an organization of long and hon- 
orable tradition. This year it cele- 
brates its D5th birthday. "This so- 
ciety was formed on the twenty-sixth 
day of April, eighteen hundred and 
forty-seven for the purpose of ad- 
vancing the literary achievements of 
the members and to give them more 
faith in themselves when called upon 
Euddenly to deliver an address . . . 
that he will be better able to cope 
with the many difficult problems of 
life which will be constantly present- 
ing themselves to him when he leaves 
hh Alma Mater to battle with the 
stormy billows of life." This was 
written by "a member" in October, 
1875. Among the founders was the 
father of the late Ezra Perkins, for- 
mer treasurer of the College, ac- 
cording to Doctor Jones. 

There is a gap in the written history 
existing from the time of founding 
till 1876. From 187G till 1901 the 
minute books of Mount Vernon have 
been preserved. The unknown his- 
torian who sorted the loose leaves,' 
numbered the books, etc., deserves a 
note of thanks from the Society. In- 
dicative of the difference of the books 
is the penmanship which grows from 
a fairly plain hand to a beautiful 
copper-plate script, then gradually 
slips back to the simple style. 



95 YEARS OLD 



Mt. Vernon Literary Society 



The history of the College in those 
year-, might well be traced through 
these minute books. In our more 
immediate acquaintance, we find the 
membership list for 1899 containing 
the names of G. A. Bunting, J. S. W. 
Jones, E. Perkins, and W. B. Usilton. 
Dr. Bunting was treasurer for the 
second session of 1889. Dr. Jones' 
name appears on the roster for 1886 
at the bottom of the list. No. 20 — 
J. S. William Jones, New Jersey" — 
and we can see from the record that 
he was not absent from any of the 
meetings. 

"The motion of Mr. Bounds (as to 
the time of adjournment for the se- 
mester) having been defeated, Mr. 
Bounds immediately resigned as a 
member of the society, and took his 
departure with the universal regret 

f all its members." A cryptic com- 
ment is penciled above "regret" — 

Get your platonic, Joe." Doc Jones 
was elected President of the society 



for the session beginning January 
15th, 1888. 

Another officer of the Society was 
the secretary in April in 1899 when 
the fourth minute book ran out. The 
name is D. G. Roe. Another inex- 
plicable note is penciled in the back 
of the book — (Roe to Vera). 
"My love for you will ever flow 
Like molasses down a potato row." 
Three Versions Of Constitution 
Three versions of the Constitution 
of the Society exist; the first is the 
constitution of 1874 — a second revis- 
ed constitution 1875 — third, a fur- 
ther revision dated 1883. Thes,e are 
formal constitutions carefully out- 
lining the duties and privileges of 
membership. As is the custom of 
any society there is a very interest- 
ing section devoted to fines. "For 
leaving seat without the permission 
of the president — 5 cents; for any 
noise or disorder which in the opin- 
ion of the president interrupts the 
society — 10 cents; for personal, in- 
sulting, profane, and indecent lang- 



uage in Society debate — not less than 
10 cents and not more than 50." 

The earliest constitution, that of 
1874, contained eighteen points for 
the conduct of the society. There 
may be some confusion of dates but it 
may be assumed that this is closer to 
the original organization. Point 
number nine reads "That any mem- 
ber seen spitting tobacco juice on the 
floor shall be fined 5 cents." This ar- 
ticle is not included in the 1875 con- 
stitution but was reinstated in 1883, 
in those days of modern conveniences, 
hot water, steam heat, et al; the du- 
ties of the janitor might prove inter- 
esting. The janitor, appointed by 
the president, shall keep the lights in 
order, and furnish water for the So- 
ciety during the session of its meet- 
ings." 

, Perhaps this was not all. The min- 
utes of the meeting presumably be- 
gun Dec. 31st, 1875, read as follows: 
"Society met and was v (all of these 
words crossed out and several blank 
lines left, then appears) — Happy 



New Year 1876, may the Mount V 
non Literary Society never be l 
prosperous than now!" 

Only Society For Fitfy Y e » ri 

The Society for about fifty y*. 
held the enviable position of the <n_ 
Society on the campus. It sponsor 
classes for, debating, rhetoric, 
composition, the holding of which > 
established as part of the meeting 

Since those days, things ^ 
changed. Today Dr. Ford can ta 
plain of the over-abundance of e*h 
curicular activities on the hill. T 
Society has relinquished thos 
ial functions and now meets pup 
for the pleasure of hearing a 
speaker or discussion of some pd, 
of literature over the well-known i 
freshments. This limits only 
scope of the Society, the spirit 
mains the same. 

In our ninety-fifth year we 
proud that the Society has attain 
such a mark, but we feel that th< 
is nothing really to speak of til 
centennial year of 1947. Will 
Society live that long? It appsj 
so. It has survived a good 
things in its long and varied can 
and five years from now will probaj 
see it hale and hearty as ever. 

As Virgil said, "The old age 
God is green." 



I 



Washington Elm 
Changes Hands 

Elm Tree Was Once Protected 
By Signs Banning Necking 



i (Continued from Page 1) 
21 for The Flying Pentagon, the next 
highest. 

The Washington ELM was pub- 
lished for the first time under that 
name on October 18, 1930. Before 
the new name had been adopted, the 
Elm tree had been brought into the 
paper. While W. Kennon Perrin was 
Editor-in-Chief, an editoriaj column 
was run under the head of The Slip- 
pery Elm. It was started sometime 
between the May 24 and October 4 
issues. Though it's an upheld fact 
that the good old days are not nearly 
so good as the present, all the issues 
we found of the old Collegian and 
ELM had six pages. We see that we 
are apparently getting back to it. 







Scientists O. K. 
ODK Key Plan 

Three main topics — assembly, sci- 
ence exhibit, and the ODK activities 
key — formed the center of discussion 
at the Wednesday night meeting of 
the Society of Sciences in Dunning 
Hall. 

All of these subjects had been pre- 
viously discussed by the Society, but 
no final action had been taken. 

After the meeting, a picture of the 
group was taken by the Pegasus pho< 
tographer for the yearbook. Follow 
ing the picture, refreshments wen 
served. 

The previous motion made by the 
group that plans for the assembly 
program be suspended was rescinded, 



and President Diacumakos called a 
meeting of the faculty advisors, Drs. 
Buxton, Coop and Corrington and a 
committee of members yet to be ap- 
pointed, to be held next Tuesday at 
3:15 in the lecture room in Dunning 
Hall, to work out details for the as- 
sembly, which is to be given on March 
5. 

Final action on the ODK activities 
key, which was discussed at three 



Dr. Julian T. Power 

OPTOMETRIST 

Chester-town, Maryland 

Phone 132W 



CUMBERLAND COAL 
COMPANY 

Producers Wholesalers 

Retailers 

"Stokol" Stokers 

217 E. Redwood St. 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



previous meetings, resulted in the de- 
cision to cooperate with that organ 
zation in installing that plan. 



Dramatic Club 
Postpones Plays 

Sophomores Finish Rehearsals 
While Seniors Pick A Play 



(Continued Irom Page 1) 
man play are having some difficulty 
in having rehearsals, and it's not be- 
cause of the love scenes. Nothing 
else can be said about their play ex- 
cept that if they want to keep the 
reputation of their play being a con- 
test winner, they had better work the 



Kent County Savings Bank 

Commercial and Savings 

Accounts 

Member Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 



| Usilton's | 

/ Phone 72 High St. £ 

:-:n*v*\w\\\\\\n%w\%vxxw-: 



WILLIAM'S 

Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



remaining two weeks. 

After much searching and plci 
ing, a senior was at last found nl 
would produce a one-act play, 
ria Petry was talked into directing 
senior play and the busy Sa 
Blackwood to accost her. Since tl 
is the last chance for any acting ti 
ent of the seniors to be displayed! 
is expected that all who are asked 
participate will do so. 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 

. . . phone 14 



Choose 

Hochschild, Kohn & Co. 

for correct 

Campus and College Wear 



▼ 

Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

▲ 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builders 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campui Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



Charles Dimmling & Co. 

Quality Meats and Poultry 

Stores and Institutions 

Supplied 

"We are not afraid to boa»t 
When it comes to tender roast" 

602 S. Broadway, 
Baltimore, Md. 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

Service 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 



PITTSBURGH PAINTS 

"Smooth As Glass" 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass 
Company 

Baltimore, Maryland 



Gill's 

Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 



Rates Are Listed For 
Summer Session 

Tin' <■" I I" r * i- I In- Hiinirnr.T scs- 
iihi which is in be held from 
June the 8th to August the 
[5th has been decided upon by 
the business office according to 
Mr. Johns, The proposed 
twelve week summer session 
will be condensed into a ten 
week calendar period. In order 
to reduce the tuition and to 
give added vacation to the stu- 
dents and faculty. The cost, 
an decided upon, will include 
$150 for boarding students and 
§75 for the local or commuting 
students. Thin flat charge in- 
cludes room, board and tui- 
tion. The summer session will 
be divided into five week per- 
iods. The charge for the one 
period will be §85 for boarding 
students and $45 for transients. 
There will be special rates a- 
rlaptable to individual programs 
if work for those taking a spec- 
id number of hours. These 
ates will be higher than those 
for a full course. These rates 
ire comparable to all nearby 
iolleges offering summer ses- 
iiins according to Mr. Johns. 



Sovernment Aid 
May Be Given 
College Students 

One of the important problems dis- 
issed at the national Conference of 
ollegc and University Presidents 
hsn the movement toward accelerat- 
d programs began, was the question 
if the ability of many students to 
nance attendance at a summer term. 
It is understood that a great many 
sually spend the summer working so 

to help pay the fees of the follow- 

: year. Conference was immedi- 
tely started by the U. S. Office of 
Iducation with proper authorities 
ticking toward government assistance 
or such students. In the meantime, 
t appears evident that the N. Y. A. 
be withdrawn, closing that pos- 
jbility. 

Progress has been reported in the 
[fitter of the proposed government 
absidy. The U. S. Office of Educa- 
lon's Wartime Commission on Feb- 
18 took an action which indi- 
itea that proper legislation will be 
wily for approval by the Office of 
ht Budget and submission to Con- 
ress within a few days. 



U. Of M. Drops 
Final Exams. 



Board Approves Summer Session 




••••• 

SSTJ35 

••••• 



Vol. XLI. No. 20. 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1942 



Price Five Cents 



Wilmer Calls 
2nd Blackout 
On Feb. 4th 

A county-wide blackout has been 
set for next Wednesday, March 4, to 
be of a 20-minute duration sometime 
between the hours of 9 and, 11 P. M., 
it was announced by Phillip G. Wil- 
mer, local director of civilian defense 
The blackout at Washington College 
will be handled by the staff named by 
Mr. Johns for the previous blackout. 

According to the announcement by 
Director Wilmer the air raid wardens 
in each district will be responsible for 
setting up the warning signals. In 
Chester town, for example, the signal 
will be the same as on the occasion 
of the previous test — three short 
blasts, repeated three times at inter- 
vals of one minute, the blasts coming 
from the whistle at the Chestertown 
Electric Light and Power Company. 

The entire Washington College 
campus was "blacked-out" in some- 
thing less than thirty seconds in the 
previous test and it is hoped that the 
same efficiency will be displayed dur- 
ing this test. 

Attacks on the California Coast, 
said Director Wilmer, make a real 
test all the more desirable and he ask- 
ed the 100 per cent cooperation of 
the people in every section of the 
county. Speaking at a luncheon of 
the Chestertown Business Men's Ass- 
ociation he said, "I only hope in 
Chestertown that the blackout will be 
effective as it was on the previous 
occasion." 

He indicated that the length of the 
blackout had been extended to 20 
minutes, instead of the 15-minute 
period used before, in order to permit 
fire companies to make test hook-ups 
with water systems during the period 
of darkness. It was estimated that 
20 minutes would be required for a 
thorough test of the system in Ches- 
tertown. 



Nine Members 
Added To SSO 



The University of Maryland's gen- 
'fal administrative board yesterday 
Bnounced final examinations would 
abolished and increased emphasis 
laced on class attendance and per- 
oneal tests. 
This policy is part of the acceler- 
'ed wartime program under which 
Pe usual four-year course will be tel- 
fCOped into two and a half or three 
ears, permitting students to com- 
fete their education before reaching 
Solitary service age. 

Commencement May 30 

No final examinations will be held 

Jt the end of the current semester. 

passes will end May 28, and coni- 

-'iieement exercises for seniors will 

held May 30. 

"The university believes strongly 

^t academic grades should reflect 

"Jch more than a student's perform- 

'"ce on an examination," the general 

'diuinistrative board said in announc- 

n ? the new policy. 

Vacations Eliminated 
"It believes that regular contacts 
(Continued on Page 6) 



Warren Hodges 
Offers Course 
For Draftsmen 



If you haven't contemplated as yet 
the opportunities available in the 
field of industrial science, now is the 
time to start. Maybe you have been 
considering it but haven't found the 
solution as to how to begin. Warren 
Hodges, who has had a good deal of 
experience in this line, is offering a 
thirty-six hour course this semester. 
The class meets on Tuesday and 
Thursday from 6:45 - 8:15. The 
charge is $4.25 for the entire course. 
However, no college credit is to be 
given. 

The course consists of the funda- 
mentals of mechanical drawing; blue- 
print reading; "toleranced dimen- 
sions"; details of screw threads; "loft 
layouts" (i. e., photostatic copy of 
print on sheet metal); and machined, 
welded, and forged sheet metal parts. 

There will be unlimited "cuts" from 
the class. Although there will be no 
tests or homework, there will be a fin- 
al exam on blueprint reading. The 
first class met on Tuesday, February 
24. 



Sigma Sigma Omieron, the honor 
ary scholarship society, inducted nini 
new members at the annual assembly 
yesterday. They are: Milton Dorf 
and Ernest Larmore, seniors, and 
Virginia Cooper, Albert Mponey, Nor- 
ma Wood, Omar Jackson, Robert 
Hoidt, James Parris and Martin En- 
gel, juniors. 

Dr. Buxton, one of the faculty 
members of the organization, was the 
i'eature speaker on the program. He 
said that in time of war and interna- 
tional unrest among nations, there is 
a natural tendency towards a definite 
decline in scholarship. ^In spite of 
this, he noted, we must all try to 
maintain our usual high standards of 
scholarship in order that we may be 
better equipped to face the future. 

After several introductory remarks 
by James Diacumakos, president of 
the society, Rufus Johnson outlined 
the history of the organization iti 
Wasington College. It started here! 
in 1933 under the direction of several| 
faculty members. It was then made 
open for both males and females. In 
1938, the present Greek-letter name 
was adopted and a movement was 
started for a Dean's List. This goal 
has been completely realized this 
year. The Society is now trying to 
get one day off between regular class- 
es and exams, according to Johnson. 

Membership in S. S. O. is limited to 
twenty seniors and second-semester 
juniors who have an accumulative in- 
dex of 2.25 or more and who are a- 
mong the upper 15 per cent in their 
class standings. 



Semicentennial 
Of Co-education 
To Be Held Here 



Stacks Can Not 
Open - Coleman 

The library stacks will not be op- 
ened, it was announced by Mr. Cole- 
man this week. Despite the editor- 
ials and student opinion, Mr. Cole- 
man feels that there is no need for 
open stacks in the Bunting Library. 
Anyone wanting to use the stacks can 
obtain a permission card, and from 
the small demand for them it can be 
assumed that no one feels hampered 
by the closed stacks, according to Mr. 
Coleman. 

To the supply of volumes already 
in our library have been added some 
other than those on display at the 
desk. Of the new ones three are col- 
lections of the paintings, statutes, and 
monuments of George Washington, j 
They are entitled "Portraits of Wash- 
ington." Dr. Ford has ordered a 
new Spanish Book, — "Historia de la 
Nacion Mexicana." This with a book 
on Latin America have been placed in 
the stacks. 



President Mead Announces 
Ten- Week Summer Course 



The establishment of a ten-weeks summer session ex- 
tending from June 8 to August 15 was approved by the Board 
of Visitors and Governors of the College at their mid-winter 
meeting last Saturday, it was announced by President Mead. 

Heretofore all plans concerning the summer term were 
tentative, since the Board's consent was necessary before the 
summer term became a fact. 

* This innovation has been made in 
the interests of acceleration of acad- 
emic programs. During each of the 
two five-week periods, any student 
may carry not more than six term 
hours. The mdximum credit obtain- 
able from attending the summer ses- 
sion therefore will be twelve semes- 
ter hours. 

Any Junior who has 108 hours to 
his credit at present will be allowed 
to graduate at the end of this sum- 
mer; if less than 108 hours, he should 
graduate in February, 1943. Like- 
wise, any sophomore who has carried 
a normal work load will be enabled to 
graduate in September, 1943. Fresh- 
men who .carry 18 hours per semester 
will graduate in June, 1944, and 
thereby gain a whole year. 

Provision will be made for an in- 
coming group of freshmen at the be- 
ginning of summer as well as in Sep- 
tember. Courses will also be open to 
public school teachers who desire 
summer work for purposes of certi- 
fication or advancement to their de- 
grees, and the Board voted to estab- 
lish the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Education for teachers in service 
who complete graduation require- 
ments by summer term attendance. 

No faculty member can teach more 
than two courses, therefore some ar- 
rangements will have to be made a- 
bout advanced students. Results of 
questionaires filled out in Miss Whit- 
aker's office show that courses in 
chemistry, mathematics, Spanish and 
education are heaviest — demanded 
for summer school and these courses 
will probably be given at that time. 



The progress of plans for Com- 
mencement exercises on May 25th, at 
which time special attention will be 
called to the anniversary of fifty 
years of co-education at the College, 
was reported by Dr. Mead to the 
Board of Visitors and Governors at 
their mid-winter meeting Saturday. 

At that meeting the Board also vot- 
ed to establish a summer term at the 
College, in the interests of accelera- 
tion of academic progress. In the 
matter of granting credits and de- 
grees to men who leave for militar5' 
or naval service before their gradua- 
tion, the Board recommended that on- 
ly such men as apply for considera- 
tion at the conclusion of their service 
be considered, and that these men 
meet certain individual requirements 
as the College desires to impose. 

Commencement plans are still be- 
ing worked out, with much attention 
being given to the anniversary of co- 
education. While no announcement 
can as yet be made, it is understood 
that persons of national importance 
may be expected to participate in the 
program Commencement Day. 

The resolution recently adoptea by 
the National Conference of College 
and University Presidents, and ac- 
cepted by the meeting of the Mary- 
land Conference of Educators, will 
guide the College in the matter of 
granting credits to men who are call- 
ed out of college to serve in the mili- 
tary or naval services. By this ac- 
tion, anyone who will receive credit 
or be awarded a degree must apply 
for consideration at the conclusion of 
service, and must meet any indivi- 
dual requirements the College choos- 
es to impose. 



Tayl 



BRING YOUR TICKET 

Graduate Manager of Ath- 
letics, Fred W. Dumschott an- 
nounced today that no student 
under any circumstances will be 
admitted to the Loyola-Wash- 
ington College game Saturday 
night without his athletic ticket. 
If you don't have one, you will 
have to pay the admission price 
of 44c. 



or Elected To 
Head Lambda's 



L. Bates Russell 
Elm Publisher 
Succumbs Here 



Francis Taylor, Jr., was elected 
High Alpha of Lambda Chi Alpha 
Fraternity for the ensuing year at 
their election of officers on Monday 
evening. The other officers are: 
High Beta, Charles B. Nairn, Jr.; 
High Gamma, Robert R. Ruff; High 
Tau, John R. Smith, Jr.; High Ep=i- 
lon, Rudolph Parks; High Phi, An- 
drew R. Gorman. 

The pledges elected their tempor- 
ary chairman and secretary-treasurer 
at their meeting on Thursday even- 
ing. Francis Shinnamon, Jr., was 
elected chairman and Branch War- 
field, secretary-treasurer. 



L. Bates Russell, prominent civic 
leader, died February 21, on his sev- 
enty-sixth birthday anniversary. On 
the day he died, Mr. Russell was to 
have received a plaque honoring him 
as Chestertown's outstanding citizen. 

A newspaper publisher and busi- 
nessman, he was the first person to be 
selected by the Chestertown Business 
Men's Association as the year's out- 
standing citizen. He was owner and 
editor of the Chestertown ENTER- 
PRISE, which he founded in 1894. 
He was president of the two motor 
corporations, vice-president of two 
banks, president of the Kent Building 
and Loan Association, and proprietor 
of a motion picture theatre. 

Mr. Russell is survived by four 
sons: L. Bates Russell, Jr., Emerson 
Russell, Harry Russell Joseph Rus- 
sell; two daughters: Miss Inez Rus- 
sell and Mrs, James Hadaway; and 
a granddaughter, Miss Betty Thibo- 
deau. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 19^ 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States, Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, i782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 

Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 

This Week's Editor Molly Blackwood 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor S John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1942 



EDITOR'S 
DESK 



3ln ^gmpathg 



It is with the deepest sympathy that we announce 
the death of Mr. L. Bates Russell, gentleman and lead- 
er. Mr. Russell, who died on his seventy-si^th birthday 
and on the day that he was to receive the medal as 
Chestertown's "Outstanding Citizen", had been the 
publisher of the Washington College Elm for fifteen 
years. 

Mr. Russell lived an ambitious life and one which 
every man of Washington College could truly use as an 
example. He began his life as a clerk in the Chester- 
town stores. Through ambition, he entered the insur- 
ance business and later founded The Enterprise in 
1894. He was one of the pioneers on the Eastern 
Shore in the motion picture industry and established a 
picture parlor over his newspaper office in 1907. He 
continued in that business until his death, owning and 
managing the New Lyceum Theatre which he had erect- 
ed a dozen or more years ago. 

He headed two automobile concerns. He was pres- 
ident of the Kent Building and Loan Company. He was 
vice-president of the People's Bank. He was vice- 
president of the Kent County Savings Bank. He was a 
director of the Chestertown Volunteer Fire Company. 
He served for twelve years on the Kent County Board 
of Education, six of them as president. He served as 
chairman of the local State Central Committee. He was 
a member of the Masonic Lodge for nearly fifty years. 

But Mr. Russell was more than a business man. He 
was also a family man. He had four sons and three 
daughters, six of whom were graduates of Washington 
College. He was a kind and indulgent father, sacrific- 
ing that his family might have its every want. He was 
a kind and tolerant employer and a sincere friend. 

We, of the Elm, who knew Mr. Russell, consider 
our acquaintance a pleasure and a privilege. We will 
always be inspired by his fine example. For Mr. L. 
Bates Russell, gentleman and leader, there can be noth- 
ing but the peace and quiet that he so richly deserves. 

J. C. J. 



CutOfi One More Week 

The University of Maryland's general administrative board 
abolished all final examinations for the duration of the acceler- 
ated wartime program beginning this semester, it was announc- 
ed yesterday. Classes will end on May 29 and commencement 
will be held on May 30. 

The reason for this abolishment according to the board was 
as follows: "The university believes strongly that academic 
grades should reflect much more than a student's performance 
on an examination. It believes that regular contacts in the 
classroom are, and should be, of the greatest importance in de- 
termining the profit that an individual obtains from a given 
course." This is precisely what students have been maintain- 
ing for many years. 

At Washington College, "Blue Books" were abolished, 
theoretically. In their place, an increased number of "yellow 
sheets" are being given. Many college instructors are giving 
two and three "yellow sheets" weekly and some are giving them 
daily. About every two weeks, a "yellow sheet", which really 
amounts to a blue book, is given. Certainly, no final examina- 
tions will be needed to determine a student's grade with all 
these daily tests. 

Washington College has followed the general trend of 
American Colleges by accelerating its program and by install- 
ing a summer session. It cut one week from the regular sche- 
dule by eliminating vacations and it cut another week by giving 
night classes. The students are appreciative. Still another 
week can be cut from the schedule by eliminating final exami- 
The students would appreciate this. 



CONSTITUTIONS 
MUST CHANGE 

Now that we know definitely that 
there will be a summer session, we 
must adapt ourselves to it. It seems 
as though extra-curricular activities 
will be affected the greatest. Under 
the new system present Juniors will 
graduate in February, Sophomores 
will graduate in September and 
Freshmen will graduate in February. 
In this way, many o the cam- 
pus leaders will be graduated in 
the middle of the year. Under 
many of the present organiza- 
tions' constitutions, this system 
will necessitate a special election 
of officers almost every semes- 
ter. 

There seems to be but two alter, 
natives for the organizations to take 
Either the responsible positions must 
be invested in the hands of Juniors 
rather than Seniors, or constitution: 
must be amended to the affect than 
an election of officers will be held at 
the beginning of each month. 



THIS WEEK'S 



PERSONALITY 

—ON THE CAMPUS 



WE MUST 
CHOOSE ONE 



nations. 



We must choose one of these alter- 
natives and we must choose wisely for 
"for the duration" may be a long 
time. The first seems impractical. 
Leadership in cetrain organizations 
such as the Student Council or the 
Elm and Pegasus where large sums of 
money are involved requires mature 
thinking, judgment, conservatism and 
experience. 

The latter seems to be the al- 
ternative we will be forced to 
adopt. If Seniors must be the 
leaders, we must select the sys- 
tem that will make them the lea- 
ders. Semester elections will se- 
cure this. One must be held at 
the beginning of each semester. 

Now, of course, there will be oc- 
casions where the Senior will be grad- 
uated in June. If so, so much the 
better. We must amend our consti- 
tutions so that reelection is legal. By 
reelection, a capable Senior leader, 
graduating in June, may still serve a 
full school term. 

ACTIVITIES FOR 
THE SUMMER 

Now some people are going to say 
that we should maintain all our extra- 
curricular activities throughout the 
summer. Never. This won't he 
"summer school" as we think of it. 
It will be a regular semester shorten- 
ed to ten weeks and its only similari- 
ty to "summer school" will be that it 
will be held during the summe 
months. 

Those who would be the lead- 
ers and even those who would be 



This week's personality is Basil 
Clark. Quiet, reserved, and leader 
of the Lambda Chi's, Basil's popular- 
ity was proven in December when he 
was runner-up in the popularity con- 
test for Mr. Washington. 

"Bas" was born on a farm near 
Ellicot City, Maryland, October 10, 
1917. He says he attended a little 
"hick" grammar school, but he hast- 
ened to inform us that it wasn't a= 
bad as Dave . Bartolini's. In high 
school he was no brain storm and to 
quote him, "he just about got 
through." After graduation he join- 
ed the navy and saw the world. In 
1938 he decided a college diploma 
was necessary to follow his ambition 
to enter the merchandising fjeld so ho 
followed his brother's footsteps to 
Washington College. 

Basil joined the Lambda Chi fra- 
ternity in his sophomore year and was 
secretary in his junior year, and pres- 
ident in his senior year. He was 
elected to the Student Council in his 
freshman year,* and he has held this 
office for his four years in college. He 
is associate editor of the PEGASUS 
this year. As a reward for his lead- 
ership on the campus he was selected 
for Who's Who in American Colleges 
anil Universities and was elected into 
ODK. 

Basil is holding his own on the cam- 
as as a Reid Hall Cadet. He says 




he likes to take life easy and plaj 
Bridge. The navy life must appej 
to him because he has reenlistcd 
V7, and he expects to enter in Ma] 
or October. Throughout tins mi 
view Basil talked about Honolulu 
we understand now why he is tutnlffl 
back to the navy. "A girl in ever] 
port", so the saying goes, bul i i 
ever he is this time next year, gom 
luck to a swell fellow! 



Where Were You? - 



Mimi and Allou thought that they 
had visitors the other night — disap- 
pointed? Mary Liz is reading "Un 
cle Tom" on the sly — the book i; 
banned at her house. 

Items of the week: 

"Fancy Pants" McNiff — Pickles 
with that lonesome look — Ann still 
dashing here and there— Ginny to be 
congratulated — play-offs being wor- 
ried about — game Wednesday, good 
— ping pong matches flourishing, all 
bets accepted. 

Pat and Val had a long ride — free 
too! But, oh! how cold it was. Boy- 
er wondered if the pilots in those 



bombers had any lunch; he v.. r | 
ly worried. 

Glamor boy Paul is see-lipping; b 
yes. 

Sorority dance is bringing aboil 1 
many questions and some answers 
it happens every year. The liglil 
system in Reid Hall is really a &1 
situation; first they're on and then- 
but you know! 

The war scare 'has been too niuct 
for the second floor of Reid Hall. Tin 
girls have all reverted to jack Ben 
ty and Ginny are leading; we though! 
it was mice. 

Dotty and Helen Marie a: 
ing the season. It seems you hav( 
to break the ice to go wading. 



Dr. Dole Stands Up Alfred Univ. 
After Fifteen Summer Sessions 



will not have the 
■ly participate and 
r their clubs. What 
doing well isn't 
id this cer- 



the foil 

time to actii 

do the best f 

isn't worth doin 

worth doing at all 

tainly holds true for extra-cui 

ricular activities. 

But, as in every case, there are 
ceptions. Everyone will agree that 
there will be a need for the Student 
Council and we will also need ODK. 
The need for the Student Council is 
self-evident. ODK will be needed 
to provide the necessary recreation 
and to serve as a service organization. 
All other clubs will be unnecessary 
during the summer. 

Congratulations to the new 
members of the Brain Trust. So 
long and thirty. J. C. J. 



Very near Buffalo in New York 
state is situated a small town of nine 
hundred inhabitants, smaller than 
Chestertown. In the mountain vil- 
lage of Alfred is Alfred University 
where Dr. Dole professor of history 
and art has taught summer school for 
thirteen years. 

She teaches only two classes of 
four or five students. The Universi. 
ty had always welcomed professors 
from other colleges to teach at its 
summer school. Through Dr. Paul 
Titsworth, former president of Wash- 
ington College, graduated from Al- 
fred, Dr. Dole began to teach there 
fifteen years ago. They will miss her 
this summer though because she will 
be teaching at the summer session to 
be held here at Washington College. 

Alfred is a quiet town with two 
groeery stores, one hardware, a cloth- 
ing store and two barber shops. Al- 
though most of the entertainment is 
twelve miles away at Hornell, Alfred 
does have movies twice a week in the 
College building, and there are lakes 
nearby for swimming. Picnicing is a 



favorite pastime. It is not unusliS 
to see people barbequeing whols 
chickens over an open fire. 

One of the most confusing things 
to Dr. Dole about Alfred is that W 
sabaths are observed, — one by thfl 
Seventh Day Baptists which begins 
Friday at sunset and ends Saturday *! 
sunset, and the regular Sunday ob- 
served by the others. The Seventh 
Day Baptists settled this town 
humier and ten years ago and at the 
same time developed Alfred Univer- 
sity which has a winter enrollment of 
one thousand students. Th^n- u 
only two other groups of these Bap- 
tists in the United States, — one 
West Virginia and one in Wisconsin 

One of Dr. Dole's most pleasant ex- 
periences there was when thirty-fo" r 
Carillon Bells, cast between 1^| 
1786, arrived from Belgium whefl 
they had been buried. Dr. Dole & A 
that when the bells arrived every b eil 
sounding instrument in town f [ ' oia 
the church bells to the alarm elotK 
rang. These bells were brought W 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Sport 




fllli Section 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM CHESTERTOWN. MD, 



PAGE THREE 



Kardash's 
Comer 



In nil probability, there will be a 

o-comered light for the eighth slot 
n iln' iManon-Dixon Loop between 

lui Hopkins and Washington. To 
Me, Nit- Blue Jays possess a record 
f 5 wins and 6 losses, and the Sho ! 
likewise, own a similar record of 
iind losses. Each loam has one 
jme yet Lo be played; Hopkins face, 
lio Western Maryland Terrors, and 
\e Maroons encounter Loyola's Grey- 
this Saturday night. In the 

■lit of a tie between the locals and 
lii- Mine Jays, another tilt will be 

■•■ ary to decide who shall corn- 
icle in the tournament. But, the 
ho'men can simplify matters very 
iBily by taking Loyola into camp this 
.t!,. 

Al the present time, the Maroons 

c comparable, if not superior to any 

im in the league. Against Camp 

:; and Catholic U., the locals ex- 

bitcd the fastest moving offensive 

ub witnessed all season. Roling up 

nd 68 points, respectively, Coach 

nchott'i charges, right now, are 

II of fire. Captain "Moose" Mc- 

ff has repeatedly come to the fore 

-■marhoble passes and his sensa- 

"chango of pace" dribble and 

dly, his rebound work has been 

opportune. But, particularly 

iloimding, the Sho'mcn are clicking 

kc a /timewatch. Not only are they 

loving the ball but they are setting 

> beautiful shots for each other. 

I:i il week, Mount St. Mary's pull- 
3 the biggest upset of the current 
impaign when the Mountaineers end- 
i Loyola's winning streak at nine 
Iflight games. It seems that the 
pmittsburgers pop up when least 
ipected and execute the role of 
iiBiitkillers. Earlier in the season, 
ie Mounts toppled a fast-moving 
jfestcrn Maryland team and their 
irurising victory over the Grey- 
pjinds just recently, definitely makes 
ie Mounts a potential playoff threat. 
Likewise, in a minor upset, Amer- 
!»n U. spilled the overrated West- 
n Maryland Terrors, 45-43. The 
rrors, similar to the Sho'men, are a 
ot and cold" team; both are unpro- 
vable and form the two "ifs" in the 
op. This comparison, however, is 
licative of the daffiest Mason-Dix- 
Conference in years. The mad 
amble for playoff berths and the 
enlual winner should Loyola be 
minated, will still leave league fans 
a muddle. 

Pvankie Samele, consistent little 
'ward for the Sho'men is now sec- 
mi to Maryland's lending scorer, 
Travis, with a total of 223 
Samele, not only is one of 
* Sho'men best offensive threats, 
L- is a very steady performer, 
tank deserves a lot of credit for 
wshington's sensational splurge for 
Playoff berth. In the Camp Lee 
'"if. Frank feinted and pivoted in 
pliant fashion. Only a Sophomore, 
tinele ^tiil has two more years to add 
1 bis scoring record and gain a niche 
pug the high scorers of Washing- 
"i College basketball history. 
The Loyola game this week-end 
ould draw the largest crowd of th 
lr «nt season for the locals. The 
e yhounds wind up a very strenu 
*k in their final meeting with the 
Toons. With the Sho'men in full 
lf and Loyola out to prove to league 
"« that their defeat at the hands of 
! Mounts was a fluke, basketball 
"owers are in for a thrilling treat. 
Maroons out to trounce the Grey- 
PUnds — go get 'em, boys! 



Pentagon Faces Loyola At Armory In 
Final League Game Tomorrow Night 



Loyola Has Lost Only One 

Contest To Date; Will Be 

McNiff's Last Loop Test 



The Sho'men are battling for a spot 
in the playoffs for the Mason-Dixon 
Conference championship and a great 
deal hinges on the outcome of the 
game with Loyola on Saturday night 
at the armory. Loyola has practical 
ly cinched first place by virtue of 
their fine record throughout the sea- 
son, but this does not mean that they 
have won the championship. After 
the regular season is over, the top 
eight teams will go into a round-robin 
series to determine the champion of 
the conference. 

Since the setback the cagers re- 
ceived in Baltimore at the hands of 
Loyola, the spirit has been running 
high hi anticipation of Loyola's in- 
vasion of the Armory. This game 
will be marked by two of the fastest 
moving clubs in the league and should 




Dutchmen Defeat 
Catholic Univ. In 
Free-Scoring Tilt 

Continuing its drive for a place in 
the Mason-Dixon Conference play- 
offs, the Flying Pentagon trounced 
Catholic University 68 to 35< at the 
Armory Wednesday night. Th 
Dutchmen have won "five of their last 
six games, bowing only to Western 
Maryland, 

Neither team had an advantage for 
the first few minutes. Stevens, 
Voitb and Samele then began to pep- 
per the basket, giving th'e visitors lit- 
tle chance to set up their zone tie 
fense. In ten minutes, the home 
team had rolled up a 19 to 8 lead and 
led 33 to 16 at the half. Steven 
deadly on long outside shots, scored 
19 points. Voith, tallying 18, was 
right on his heels. 

Catholic U. had neither the guns 
nor the defense to stop the Dutch- 
men. 

The line-up was as follows: 
Washington G F T 

Samele, f 7 0-1 14 

Yerkes, f 4 2-2 10 

Gibe, f 1 0-0 2 

Stevens, c 8 3-3 19 

McNiff, g 2 1-1 5 

Voith, g 8 2-5 1 



West Hallers 

Capture Title 



McNiff 



cause plenty of fireworks before the 
final gun. 

The new combination which Coach 
Dumschott has developed has been 
clicking very good lately. "Honey" 
McNiff has been the mainstay of the 
club throughout the year and will a- 
gain lead the attack in quest of vic- 
tory, he will be ably assisted by "Big" 
Jim Stevens, who can really move 
around the court in fine fashion; 
Frank Samele, the high scorer of this 
year's quintet; Lew Yerkes, who is 
noted for his one handed shots; and 
Jerry Voith, a freshman who has prov- 
en his worth wben things get tough. 

Loyola will have the same team 
that opposed the Sho'men in Balti- 
more, led by fast stepping Vic Bock 
and Bernic Thobe; along with these 
two will be Barney Goldberg, Franny 
Bock and Ike Glushakow, who have 
captured, ten out of eleven conference 
games. Their only setback coming 
at the hands of Mt. St. Mary's. 



Catholic U. G F T 

Rice, f 4 6-6 14 

Limanek, f 0-2 "0 

Scanlon, c 6 1-1 13 

Cherello, g 2 0-3 4 

Pagano, g 2 0-2 4 

Mercak, c 0-0 

Balkotronis, g ^ 0-0 

Sullivan, g 0-0 



Totals 14 3-14 35 

Score by halves: 

Washington 33 35 — 68 

Catholic U. 16 19 — 35 



Gill's 

Is 

Your 

Date 

Headquarters 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



Every Intramural fan kept his fin- 
gers crossed during the last few 
games before the play-offs. These 
games were to decide the winners of 
each league (class, hall, and frateri 
ity). The Sophomores barely nosed 
out the Freshman to win the clas: 
league, while West Hall and Lambd; 
Chi Alpha took first place in their re 
spective leagues. 

As the class league drew a bye, the 
Lambdas encountered West Hall last 
Thursday in the college gymnasium 
for the semi-final. Hastings and 
Bosc scored most of the points for 
West Hall aided by good passwork 
from the other members. John 
Smith's speedy "lay-up" shots and 
Clark's accurate "set" shots rolled up 
the Lambdas' score. Playing twenty- 
minute halves, both teams were rath- 
er fatigued near the end of the game, 
and West Hall won with a score of 
42-30. 

Consequently, West Hall played 
the Sophs as the preliminary to the 
Camp Lee varsity game last Satur- 
day. Unfortunately, the Sophs were 
minus the necessary quota of mem- 
bers, thereby forfeiting the game and 



automatically giving the champion- 
ship to West Hall. However, the 
game was played off. Hastings, 
Bosc, and Johnston scored most of 
the points for West Hall; Munyan. 
Lynch, and Sinclair for the Sopho- 
mores. West Hall was victorious 
with a score of 55-31. Except for 
the Day Students' team, this is the 
first time that a fraternity hasn't got 
the championship. 



▼ 

Remember 

BILL 

BENNETT'S 

A 



Patronize Our Advertisers 




No Cramming Necessary! 

For swell flavor and 

real chewing fun -the 

answer is delicious 

Wrigley's Spearmint Gum 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 



194J 



All Out For "Dance For Victory" Tomorrow 



Pep Meeting-Dance Held 
In Gym From Four *Til 



Entire student Body wm Turn Conference 

Out To Give Team Pre- 

Game Courage Standings 



A "Dance For Victory" — some- 
thing new on the campus — will be held 
from four 'tit dinner in the gym Sat- 
urday afternoon. And it's free. The 
Shoremen can beat Loyola and 
sure themselves a spot in the league 
and 100 per cent student support wil 
help a lot. 

The idea grew out of a bull session. 
Because of the plays tonight, it was 
impossible to hold a pep meeting so 
something new had to be done. Just 
pep meetings don't work so the idea 
of combining an afternoon dance with 
the pep meeting seemed to be the 
best. 

The idea is for EVERYONE 
come to the gym tomorrow afternoon 
at 4 o'clock. Fir^t you'll dance. 
Then you'l! cheer. Then you'll dance 
some more, And then you'll cheer 
some more. Tomorrow night is the 
last regularly scheduled game the 
"Honey" McNiff and "Big" Jim Stev- 
ens wil play in so they'll get a little 
of the cheering also. 

From the gym, everyone will go to 
dinner and form dinner right to the 
game (in a body we hope). Head 
cheerleader Patterson said, "By hold- 
ing the meeting just before the gamy, 
I hope to bring the enthusiasm of the 
entire student body right from the 
meeting into the game." 

A lot of fun is in store. Besides 
dancing, Paterson, Martin and Pierce 
have worked out some new songs, 
cheers, and dances that ought to be 
hum-dingers. They'll be used at the 
game too. 

The entire corp of cheerleaders 
will be on hand for the game so that 
all stands will be covered. Loyola is 
expected to bring lots of rooters and 
the Washingtonians don't expect to 
be outyelled— OR OUTSCORED. The 
student body is going to prove to the 
team and the coaches that they are 
behind them one and all. 



Next week, beginning Thursday, 
March 5 through to Saturday, March 
7, the first eight teams in the Mason 
Dixon Loop will compete in the Play- 
off Tournament for the Conference 
title. Loyola, with just two games 
remaining, appears headed for their 
second consecutive leadership of the 
scheduled Mason-Dixon league games. 
On Thursday, March 5, the teams 
in positions 1, 2; 3, 4, will oppose 
those clubs finishing 8, 7, 6, 5 
spectively. That is, assuming that 
Loyola finishes at the top of the lea- 
gue and Washington, in eighth posi- 
tion, these two teams would play each 
other and so on in that order. Then 
on Friday, March 6, the four winners 
will be matched and therefore two 
games will constitute the semi-finals. 
Finally, on Saturday, March 7, the 
victors of the serai-finals compete in 
the tournament final. 
League Standing W L 

Loyola 11 l 

Randolph-Macon 5 2 

American U. 5 3 

Delaware 3 3 

Mt. St. Mary's 7 4 

Western Maryland 7 5 

Catholic U. 7 8 

Hopkins 5 6 

Washington '. 5 6 

—BEAT LOYOLA— 

U. Of M. Drops 
Final Exams. 



(Continued trom Page 1) 
in the classroom are, and should be, 
of the greatest importance in de- 
termining the profit that an indivi- 
dual obtains from a given course." 

In tightening rules governing class 
attendance, the Board said deans had 
been instructed to notify the parents 
of students who miss more than two 
Classes a semester. 



ROAR, BIG RED, ROAR 



Tune: ROAR LION ROAR 

Words by Robert Corley 



So won't you ROAR, BIG RED, ROAR, 
And shake the old colonial walls with 

thunder; 
Fight on for victory evermore, 
While your loyal sons and daughters gather 

'round. 
Oh! Washington, 
Old Washington, 
Shouting her name forever — 
ROAR, BIG RED, ROAR, 
Our alma mater on the Eastern Shore. 



fiSP'Clip this song out and bring it to the 
pep meeting and game with you. 
We're going to have lots of fun sing- 
ing it as the "Big Red Roars" to 
victory over Loyola. 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 

(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 

— For — 

Hungry and Thirsty Folks 



'So Long And Thirty" For Them Tomorrow Night Dr. Dole. 




"Honey" McNiff 



"Big" Jii 



"Honey" McNiff and "Big" Jim Stevens play their last 
game for Washington College in the local armory this Satur- 
day Night. Both fellows have worked hard for the Washing- 
ton team and they are expected to bear their share of the bat- 
tle to beat Loyola tomorrow night. 



(Continued from Page 2) 
Alfred University by the alumni 
1937 on the centenniary of the in s « 
tution. 

Another exciting incident (.., n. 
Dole at Alfred was when there vj 
cloud burst. Water poured down ti 
side of the mountain, through tlu 
front door and out the back of th 
dining hall into the "Roaring Kami 
adea", a small stream usually drj 

When Dr. Dole will be teaehl 
here this summer in a heat of jpi 
degrees, she will be thinking of Alfr^ 
nestled at the foot of the northern Al 
leghenies where the tempera hue 
the day time does not exceed 90' anj 
where you must wear a coat in thi 
evening. 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



D O R F ' S 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 

High Street 



The Well - Dressed 
College Man 
Chooses His 

SPRING CLOTHES 

at 

HUTZLERBPQTHERS6 

Baltimore, Md. 



PITTSBURGH PAINTS 
"Smooth As Glass" 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass 
Company 

Baltimore, Maryland 



CORKHILL 
FRANKS 

ARE GOOD 
ANYTIME 

Every Time! 



Read the ELM 



Charles Dimmling & Co. 

Quality Meats and Poultry 

Stores and Institutions 

Supplied 

"We are not afraid to boast 
When it comes to tender roast" 

602 S. Broadway, 
Baltimore, Md. 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



For that 


"Esquire look" . . . 


buy your clothes 


... and furnishings at 


LbBU, S in Baltimore 


15 W. Baltimore St. near Charles 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



MON. - TUES. - WED., MARCH 2-3-4 

—AT LAST IT'S ON THE SCREEN— 

Bigger - Better - Funnier - Crazier 

GREATER THAN THE STAGE SHOW 

"HELLZAPOPPIN' " 

Starring — 

OLSEN and JOHNSON 

with MARTHA RAYE 

HUGH HERBERT - MICHA AUER 

WED. - THUR. - FRI., MARCH 5-6-7 
—BIG DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM— 
Hero In Overalls . . . He Has A Secret 
And He Kept It. 

"JOE SMITH, AMERICAN" 

with ROBERT YOUNG 

—Plus Hit No. 2— 

Here's To Great Fun 

"THE BODY DISAPPEARS" 

— with — 

JEFFREY LYNN - JANE WYMAN 

EDWARD EVERETT HORTON 

—NEXT WEEK— 
"WOMAN OF THE YEAR— 



NEW3 iiv 
&RIEF. . . . 



Baseball Meeting Monday 
Coach Kibler has issued a call for 

,]l baseball candidates to report to 
s gym on Monday afternoon at 
[5. No equipment is necessary and 
, main object of this first meeting 
to see how many are interested in 
Bcball. For the first week or so the 
irkouts will be held in the gym with 
; idea of loosening up the arms, 
i„, ir, going outside. Coach Kib- 

er has asserted time and again that 

[you work hard he will help you as 
„"<li as he possibly can but, if you 

blend to loaf, don't even bother com- 
■ out because he has no patience 
h loafers. 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 




JLMlli 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 



Vol. XLI. No. 21. 



FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 1942 



Price Five Cents 



Jackson Elected As K. A. I 

On Monday, Kappa Alpha elected 

its officers for 1942-43, effective 

| R . flrsl week in April, Omar Jackson, 

j James Juliana, II; and Leonard 

mis, III. 

Jackson, a Junior, is a member of 
he Student Council, 0. D. K., S. S. 
)., and the Varsity Club. He is also 
,,, ead of West Hall, bolder of a 
niciii. scholarship, and is a two-letter 
nan. Juliana, who is a Sophomore, 
i insity football and basketball,. 

jid is a member of 'the business staff 
of the ELM. Parris, a Junior, is a 
ncmber of the ELM staff, a member 
of S. S. 0„ and is senior basketball 
nanager. Jackson and Juliana were 
pitiated into the chapter last semes- 
ind Parris, in April, 1940. 
fa Omega has purchased a $50 
defense bond out of its savings ac- 
iOUllt. 



New Handbook 
To Be Published 
Here June 8th 



Competition For Editorship 

Open To All Members Of 

The Student Body 



New Actives At Z. T. A. Meet 

Monday night was the first meet- 
Dg for the seven new actives. The 
iraditional refreshments were served 
after a short business meeting. 

Last Saturday the Zeta patronesses 
gave the initiating banquet for the 
irity in Rcid Hall Library. Ther 
e toasts given by the actives and 
patronesses. It was interrupted by 
?h for the basketball game, but r 
good time was had by all. 



Editor for the College Handbook 
will be selected in a competition open 
to all members of the student body, 
it was decided yesterday afternoon by 
the Board of Student Publications. 

Because recent changes in the Col- 
lege calendar make it desirable to is- 
sue the new handbook by June 8 
rather than in September, the Board 
decided that steps should be immed 
lately undertaken for the selection of 
the new editor. A meeting will be 
held this Tuesday at 12:40 in the 
ELM Office, at which Dr. Werner will 
explain in detail the basis upon which 
the editor will be selected. The se 
lection itself will be made by the first 
of next month. 

At its meeting yesterday the Board 
also decided to adopt a semi-permar. 
ent form for the handbook, so that 
except for the changes in names of 
officers and other alterations necessi 
tated by new Council regulations and 
the like, the greater part of the hand- 
book will remain unchanged from 
year to year. This fact makes the 
coming book and its editor of unusual 
importance, for this issue will gener- 
ally determine the form of the hand- 
book! for some time to come. 

Any student interested in becom- 
ing editor is accordingly urged to at- 
tend the meeting on Tuesday. 



Scientists Hear Dr. Corrington 

Describe Bird-Artists Of U.S.A. 



Four Players End Career 

The game last night was the finish 
to the collegiate ball-playing career 
of "Honey" McNifT, "Big Jim" Stev- 
"Doc" Lore and "Ink Spot" 
Kaidash. Lore and Kardash have 
.■ecu little action, but their work in 
practice has done much toward mak- 
ing the team as successful as it was. 
McNiff has played varsity ball four 
ars, under both Coach Kibler and 
Coach Dumschott. His close guard 
ing, ball handling, good eye, and gen 



Freshman Actors 
Win First Place 

Anne Boiling, "Shorty" Pierce 

And Ruth Johnson Star 

In Class Play 



Shortly after the discovery of the 
New World, Europeans became inter 
ested in the bird life which flourisher 
there. Consequently, various artist 
voyaged to America to paint the birds 
Among the 'rst of these was Alexan 
der Wilson who was born in Scotlam 
about a decade before the American 
Revolution. After many disappoint 
ments in the fields of law, business, 
and weaving, he went to America to 
become a professor at some American 
university. Shortly afterward he 
took up ornithology. He is noted for 
his writings rather than his paintings 
While journeying in the Middle 
West, Wilson met one John Audubon 
in Lexington, Kentucky. A country 
store-keeper, whose father was s 
wealthy planter, Audubon had many 
opportunities to study birdlife. After 
extensive travelling to various parts 
of the country, he returned home and 
compiled his paintings into an "ele- 
phantine volume" entitled BIRDS OP, 
AMERICA, which contained no writ- 
ing except the captions. Then, he 
wrote his ORNITHOLOGICAL BIOG- 
RAPHY, which was a written explan- 
ation of his pictured volume. Al- 
though the first painter to depict birds 
in action, Audubon "greatly exag- 
gerated his paintings by using gaudy 
colors." 

Louis Puertes, considered by some 
as the greatest ornithologist of all 
time, was born in Ithaca. He travel- 
led in South America, North Ameri- 
and Africa. He compiled his set 
of plates into a volume called BIRDS 
OF AMERICA. He devoted one vol- 
ume strictly to birds of New York. 
His art was "consummate, scientific 
and realistic." The world of bird- 
lovers received a great shock when it 




Sororities Devise 
Star-Dust Theme 
For Annual Fete 



Lew Lortz And His Orchestra 

To Furnish The Music For 

Panhellenic Dance 



by Joan Johnston 
"Objections Overruled", presented 
by the Freshmen, won the inter-class 
play tournament last Friday night. 
The result was something of a shock 
to everyone, to none more than to 
Anne Boiling, "Shorty" Pierce. 



Dr. Julian Corrington 



was announced that Fuertes had been 
killed in an automobile accident. 

George M. Sutton, "one of the two 
best contemporary ornithologists", 
was born in the state of Nebraska. He 
received his B. S. degree at Bethany 
University in West Virginia; he was 
awarded his Ph. D. at Cornell. He 
then became a professor and curator 
of birds at this institution in which he 
has taught since 1932. A pupil and 
great friend of Fuertes, Sutton ob- 
tained much knowledge on the subject 
of birds. From 1919 - 1925 he was 
associated with the Carnegie Museu 
at Pittsburg. During this time he 
joined an expedition of the Museum 
(Continued on Page 4) 



"Star Dust" will be the theme for 
the Panhellenic dance tomorrow 
night. The Council, hoping to make 
this occasion the best it has ever 
sponsored, has acquired a well-known 
Baltimore band, Lew Lortz and his 
13-piece orchestra. Lortz, a ncw- 
?omer to the campus, promises an ev- 
ening of distinctive arrangements 
uitable to everyone's taste. 

Mary Liz Humphreys, Ellen Peters 
ind Minor Steele, presidents of the 
-ororities and in charge of the affair, 
Have announced that the decorations 
will be in keeping with the "Star 
Dust" theme. Following the example 
of the "Sorority Set" of dances start- 
ed last year, the fifth set has been re- 
served for the Greeks alone — each 
sorority will dance to its own song. 

Each sorority has planned an inter- 

ssion party. Doctor and Mrs. 
Jones will entertain the Alpha Omi- 
cron Pi's at their home, and Mary 
Liz Humphries will entertain the 
Alpha Chi's. The Zeta's, their dates 
and friends will join in a party in the 
Reid Hall library. 

The Junior Prom, on the 13th, is 
the next event on the social calendar. 
Austin Murphy, Junior Class presi- 
dent, is not yet certain of the orches- 
tra. 



Everyday Life In Time Of War 

Is Subject Of Science Assembly 



Jones Resigns 
History Office 



Elm 
A: 



Editor Succeeds Russell 
Editor Of Enterprise 
In Two Weeks 



Various scenes of everyday life, 
such as might be expected during war 
time, were dramatized by members of 
the Society of Sciences in their an- 
nual assembly yesterday. James 
andjDiacumakos, president of the Society 



Ruth Johnson, the Freshman cast. 
Kip will not be forgotten by those I They competed against the Sopho- 
who have seen him play. Stevens! more and Junior classes. The Sen- 
has played varsity ball for three '°vs did not enter the contest 
fears atid has always pleased the The Sophomore play 
crowds with his long outside shots, 
sensation! 
ing, 

Next vear, "Dutch" Dumschott -will' S™*V °f its actors. 
find it difficult to find players capable ed Betty Hill, Rudy Parks, Lee Lach- 



Fallen 

Bough",- portrayed stark tragedy in 

■ and colorful play-, the wake of a supremely selfish worn- 

|an. Unfortunately it was beyond the 

The cast includ- 



of filling the shoes of the two boys. 



Evans-Anderson "Macbeth" ii 
Hall, Tuesday, March 10, 



■ and Elmer Thomas. 



showed how war missies can be tim- 
ed by hurling a small metal ball at a 
suspended board. As the board was 
knocked backward it hit a, "trip" 
which shut off the current holding 
another metal ball, thereby making Ur 
the timing possible. After this, Ed- 
ward Pa I der demonstrated how a 
magnetic mine works. As the metal- 



opened the program by summarizing 
the aims and accomplishments of the 
Society on the Washington College 
campus. He asserted that the present j lie hull of the ship passes over, a 
aim of the Society is to cause every i magnetic needles points toward it 
person on the campus to become ful- thereby making a contact which sets 
ly aware of the gravity and reality of j off the charge. However, he explain- 
the present world situation. Also, hei ed that many ships have coils around 
them which neutralize the magnetism 
of their hulls.. There was a minia- 
ture apparatus representing the mine 
and detonator. Bob "Winchell" Car- 
ter and John Kirwan demonstrated a 
radio receiving and sending set. 
Last but not least came the chem- 



stated that the short sketches per- 
formed would attempt to depict the 
highlights of scientific application to 
if our daily emergencies and undertak- 
"Macbeth" Records On Mar. 10 'nothing else, in adapting their play.jings. Andy Gorman acted as master 

AH interested students are invited , "Night Editor", to the "Hellzapop- of ceremonies, 
by Dr. Werner to attend the playing pin" style. But of course the comic The first sketch was put on by stu- 
of recorded selections from the j angle suddenly had to be dropped for '■■ dents interested in biology. The 
Hod- 'the tragic ending. At that point the scene was in some hospital typical of 
audience became a bit confused, hav- a small community. Henry Maguire 
ing been drawn on in the lighter vein; was- the commentator. It seems that 
and, at the telephone call, left with- 1 one Naomi Russell, an air raid vie- 
out warning to dangle bewilderedly, tim, was administered first aid by the 
with the curtain closing. The gun-, three air raid wardens; Harry Meyer, 
man introduction was most effective; Harold English, and Henri Pote. 



P.M. 

Known as a " record ra ma," the 
RCA Victor album to be played com- 
prises nine sides of twelve inch re- 
Cords, offering the more important 



scenes from the play as read, by .and 



Judith Anderson and Maurice Evans Only a quick glance was needed to see 
and their company — the same com- i that the scenery obligations were well 
that is producing "Macbeth" in. met. 



showed signs of careful rehearsal. ! Then, they took her to the hospi'al 



Baltimore the week of the 16th. 

The program, including a summary 
between selections, will take about an 
hour, and it is recommended that stu- 
dents bring copies of the text of the 
Play with them. 



According to the judges, the Fresh- 
men play won because there were "no 
low spots" in its presentation. It 
maintained a "Consistently high lev- 
el" and "didn't drag. All the char- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



for a blood transfusion, 
Sharrer, Maria Petry, and 



Norman 
Mariana 



istry sketch. This was introduced 
a very unique manner by the M. C, 
Andy Gorman. "Dutch" Smith act- 
ed as commentator. First, "Mugsy" 
Taylor, a saboteur, placed some chem- 
icals covered by excelsior in a waste 
basket. Along came unsuspecting 
workman Oily Littleton and threw 
some water in, also. Soon spontane- 
ous combustion took place and a vio- 
lent flame ensued. Secondly, Ted 



Calvert Jones, editor of the Wash- 
ington ELM, will succeed Harry S. 
Russell as editor of the Chestertown 
Enterprise on March 18. -Russell is 
leaving the Enterprise to accept a 
commission as first lieutenant in the 
He is expecting 
assignment to the Public Relations 
Branch, Army Air Forces. 

Jones resigned this week as presi- 
dent of the Washington College His- 
torical Society so that he would have 
more time to devote to the Enter- 
prise. He expects to remain with the 
Enterprise until he is drafted. 

While at Washington College, 
Jones has served as feature editor, 
assistant editor, and editor-in-chief uf 
the Washington ELM and has been 
editor of the College Handbook for 
the past two years. In addition, he 
i> serving as editor of his fraternity 
newspaper, the Beta Omega News. 
While at College, he has served twice 
as emergency editor of the Enterprise 
and of the Queen Anne's-Record-Ob- 
server. He is also sports editor of 
the Chestertown Transcript, 
oo 



Everngam were the doctor, nurse andKurze showed how propaganda 



"blood" donor respectively. This 
event was very realistic. 

Next came the physics sketch, with 
Bob Carter as commentator. Albert 
Mooney and Martin Engel gave a 
demonstration of ballistics. They 



phlets, treated with chemical 
can be used as a means of sa"botap;e 
by catching fire when" exposed to the 
air for a few minutes. Thirdly, 
"Dutch" Smith demonstrated, by 
(Continued on Page 4) 



NOTICE OF PEGASUS 

MEETING 

A very important Pegasus 
editorial staff meeting will be 
held Monday at 12:30 in the 
Pegasus office. 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 



IS: 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by-and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning- in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in length. 

Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J. Calvert Jones, Jr. 

This Week's Editor James Aycock 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. O. Werner, Faculty Adviser 

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 1942 



Dear 
Diary 



Students Protest "Yellow Peril" 

When this issue was planned, there was no idea of making 
it an "anti-yellow sheet" paper. However, the ELM is suppos- 
ed to be a student paper and to reflect student opinion. Some 
of the articles attacking the "Yellow Peril" were contributed by 
students who have no connection whatsoever with the ELM and 
who have never before written anything for the paper. Ap- 
parently the College scholars are finding the new system a little 
more than they originally bargained for. 

Students who are making good marks and who never be- 
fore complained about the educational program are now raising 
their voices to protest against what appears to be an unfair sys- 
tem. According to the accelerated schedule, no "blue books" 
were to be given this semester, yet the faculty continues to in- 1 
flict these tests upon the students under the weak disguise of jtatoe 



"super yellow sheets 
"A rose by any other 



"extended yellow sheets' 
hensive yellow sheets". 
smell as sweet". 

The faculty has been repeatedly questioned concerning fin- 
al examinations. Will they cover the material for the entire 
semester or just that after the mid-semester "blue books"? If, 
as the faculty seems to think, the final examinations will cover 
the entire semester's work, why have the mid-semester tests at 
all? They merely make more work for both students and fac- 
ulty and apparntly to no avail. 

To the knowledge of the writer, this is the first time in th> 



Monday — 6:30. Alarm clock rang. 
Shut it off with one hand and grabbed 
a text book with the other to study 
for a yellow sheet. 
7:30 — Breakfast. 
7:45 — Studied some move. 
8:00 — Took the yellow sheet 
9:00 — Took a long yellow sheet. 
10:00 — Took a yellow sheet. Teach 
er wanted to know why in the heck 
I hadn't read that four-hundred page 
book last week. 

H:00 — Took a "yellow blue book." 
11:55— Studied. 

12:15 — Lunch. Was two minutes 
late. Just made the dessert. 
12:45 — Attended a meeting. 
1:15 — Went down to the lab. 
3:15 — Got out of lab and dropped 
in the library for some books on a 
term paper due at mid-semester ex- 
ams. They couldn't find the books. 

3:30 — Looked over some stuff for 
the evening class. 

4:00— Dress for gym. 
5:30 — Got out of gym and ran like 
h — for the shower. .Missed it by 17 
other fellows. Wish I had gone 
move for track, 

5:55 — Decided to dress without 
"cold" shower. 

6:02— Was late for dinner. Po 
gone already, 



THIS WEEK'S- 



PERSONALITY 

ON THE CAMPUS 



, or compre-j 6:30— Studied list questions for ev.- 
name would ening class— just in case. 

7:00 — Glad I studied list questions. 
8 :00 — The teacher hasn't got a 
watch. 

8:10 — Somebody just told the tea- 
cher what the time was. 
8 :20 — Took an aspirin. 
8:25 — Bought a Defense Savings 
Stamp from an ODK man. 

30 — Three teachers said we 



last few years that the entire student body has protested against might have yellow sheets 
any policy or action of the school. It seems that the students 
have a definite point about which to complain. If the faculty 
and administration would make clear the policy of giving "yel- 
low sheets" so that the students do not have so very much more 
work to do than formerly and so much less time in which to do 
it, a situation that is causing considerable complaint to both stu- 
dents and faculty would be removed. 



tomorrow 



Inspections — Yes Or No 

At the beginning of the year, the Business Office announc- 
ed that they would hold inspections of the dormitories and fra- 
ternity houses at intervals to determine those rooms and houses 
which were kept the best. The prize for the best fraternity 
house was to be ten dollars. The inspections were carried out 
by the Student Council, i 

To date, two inspections have been held. The last one was 
held sometime before the beginning of the second semster. 
Whther the offer of ten dollars for the best house still holds 
good is not known. In any event, there hasn't been an an- 
nouncement to the contrary. If the award is to be given, it can 
hardly be fair with but two inspections. 

It is suggested that either the entire plan be dropped im- 
mediately or else more frequent inspections be held. 



Letter To The Editor 



Dear Editor: 

In less than three weeks the stu- 
dents of this school, because of an 
accelerated program, will find them- 
selves in the midst of mid-semester 
exams. Through no fault of 'their 
own, the students are totally in the 
dark as to the nature of these exams. 
And apparently the faculty is equal- 
ly -so, 

I resort to this method of expres- 
sing the students' feelings hoping that 
the proper authorities will read this, 
since our student council is. apparent- 
ly powerless to aid in this situation. 

I take pride in the fact that I have 
so far been a good student at Wash- 
ington College and hope to continue 
to be so. Pou: 

every other day do not bother me; 
but I do consider it unfair to be giv- 
en "blue books" in the weak disguise 
of "extended yellow sheets", when 
every student knows that theoretical- 
ly "blue books" have been abolished. 



having these 
, then just 

mid-semester 
health- 



If we are to continue 
"disguised blue books 
what purpose do the 
exams hold other than bei: 
breaking cram sessions"? 

Will there be classes conducted din- 
ing the mid-Semester exam period? If 
classes are continued during this per- 
iod, will there we "yellow sheets", 
"disguised blue books", and home- 
work? 

Will the final exams for the year 
cover the material already covered 
on mid-semester exams? 

Just what is the purpose of these 
mid-semester exams? They have not 
eliminated blue books — on the con- 
five yellow sheets ^a^-they have- increased the num- 
ber of "blue books" and also "yellow 
sheets", not to even mention outside 
collateral work due at the mid-semes- 
ter period. 

Signed, 
A Student. 



and I can't afford to miss them. 

12 :00 — Started worrying about 
term paper due in less than three 
weeks for which I couldn't get any 
books. Started reading an outside 
book instead. ■ 

1:30 — Took a last glance at the 
book for the eight o'clock. 
- 2 :00— Went to bed. Set alarm for 
6:30 and put book beside clock so as 
not to waste any time. 

2:05— Snoring. 

Note: All times are Eastern War- 
time. 



Where 
Were You? 



Harry, or better known as "Doc 
Lore was born in Cedarville, New 
Jersey, November 21, 1920. Destin- 
ed from the very first to follow in hi: 
father's footsteps to be a doctor, lit 
tie "Doc" started on the long and 
weary path at the Cedarville Gram 
mar School where he received the 
highest average in his class, of which 
lie was president. Inasmuch as the 
metropolis of Cedarville has no high 
school he ventured to the "city" 
(Bridgetown) and attended the Bridge- 
ton High School. It seems his high 
school days are his "dim, dark past", 
because all he wo.uld say was that he 
played baseball and got a certificate 
for his scholarship. We have learn- 
ed from other sources that "Doc" 
was quite a "killer" and especially 
liked his "English". Know what we 
mean? you Bridgetonites? 

Since "Doc" came to Washington, 
he has shown his ability in several 
fields. For his Greek fraternities he 
has Theta Chi and ODK. In his 
third year he was treasurer of Theta 
Chi and marshal! in his fourth. He 



was elected president of ODK 
year. As for other fields, hp 
elected to the Student Council fa 
second year and has held this < 
for three years. In his Jumoi 
he was elected secretary of the cot 
cil, and in his Senior year he 
elected vice-president. He haj 
ticipated in inter-mural ami vnro 
basketball and baseball. Possw 
a voice to be proud of, althoogj 
won't admit it, he has been a mAnl 
of the Glee Club every year. Tosi 
his achievements in college he is j. 
retary of the Publications Board u 
was selected for "Who's Who 
American College and Univers^ 
this year. 

It seems that "Doc" has sevej 
ople fooled on the campus, for 
the average person, he is quiet audi 
served but when he lets loose hods 
it right! If you don't belie\ 
ask him to tell you about his trip 
Louisiana last year — quite inters 
ing! All kidding aside "Doc" 
regular fellow and we know he'll I 
right on the top of the list of leadii 
doctors, in a few years. 



Students Voice Dissatisfaction 

With Our Daily Quiz System 



Walt wonders if wisdom teeth can 
raise your I. Q, He has two now and 
is still hoping! 

Carl is positive that the milk up 
north is superior to southern milk — 
but he was arguing against some 
"Southern Kernels", and the corn got 
in his way. 

Five girls were badly disappointed 
Tuesday night — all set to go to Balti- 
more to the game and Henry drives 
out to the Armory — but it was a good 
joke on them! 

Sara can hardly wait for Saturday 
— neither can Ellen, Helen Marie, El- 
len P. and my goodness knows who 
else — hope no one has been slighted 
in the summary. 

Bob, Liz and Alec had a bet on — 
ask Bob and Alec who won. 

Herman George Car! nearly broke 
his toe going into the shower after 
the game at Hopkins. Must have 
been really excited! 

Dance sessions at Reid Hall should 
really improve since some Victrolas 
have been down stairs. Lots of fun, 
too. " 



by Molly Blackwood 
The first opinions we heard and ex 
pressed on the new schedule for the 
second semester, whereby we should 
have only one blue book, were in loud 
praise of the system. Now we've fin- 
ished the first month of the semester, 
and the criticisms have"" changed, but 
definitely. The idea of having only 
one blue book still seems to appeal to 
most of us; other colleges, we hear 
are cutting their final exams. But 
the system of so-called yellow sheets 
is not so much to our liking. 

With blue books, we were supposed 
to have only two on one day, but yel- 
low sheets can be assigned indiscrii 
inately. And the yellow sheets some 
of the professors are giving are that 
n name only. The . faculty jokes 
ibout its "super" yellow sheets, but 
we take the brunt of the joke; and 
when you get three and four jokes in 
one day, you're just about done un- 
der. 

Looking at the situation from the 
economist's point of view| there is a 
great waste of paper in the new sys- 
tem. The back of the blue book, 
which in most cases' was used by the 
student in an examination, is now 
thrown away as each student gets a 
sheet torn from the blue book for one 
of the so-called "super" yellow sheets. 
Too, professors who have been known 



must agree that if grades could bet 
easily determined without tests 
fore, they could as easily be calculi! 
ed without this promiscuous u 
paper in a time of emergency such J 
this. 

But considering it in another veil 
we can look at it from the aagle 
what the student gets out of the nel 
schedule. The faculty advisors nrgu 
that we should take fewer courses an 
get a more thorough knowledge 
each subject. This is one way 
which to raise our indexes, ai 
though we aren't sent to college I 
make an index, it is an indication o 
what we are getting out of our wori 
Is it to be supposed that a daily yel 
low sheet will ensure more consisteo 
study, or is it more probable that th 
students will make hasty preparatio: 
for each short test without wall, 
learning as much as they should? Wil 
the work for one class be neglected' 
favor of that in which a yellow shee 
has been scheduled; for with th 
limination of blue books, the yellol 
sheets have taken on an important 
never before alotted them. 

Whatever the intention of the tut 
ulty it seems probable that instead a 
speeding up the college year and « 
abling this year's senior class to grti 
uate two weeks early, the class 



for their generosity in not giving, have to be held over until fall wW 
tests of any sort throughout thejit will receive further training froi 
course have taken to giving yellow j bombardment of yellow sheets in * 
sheets regularly. Surely the f aculty, 1 duties of a target. 



Students Display Sincere School Spirit 

In Inter-Class Plays And At Loyola Gamt 



The college student of today often 
hears his parents or other adults 
speak of the "good old days." "When 
we went to college everyone was full 
of school spirit. When we under 
took something, it succeeded. But 
the modern generation . . .!!" 

All of this may be true but we 
doubt it. The inter-class plays show- 
ed work and spirit on the part of 
some members of the younger gener- 
ation. It is hard to choose a play for 
this sort of presentation and it is us- 
ually even harder to find actors who 
are willing to or are capable of hand- 
ling the parts. Yet the casts for the 
plays last Friday night were more 



their class. Their ambition and en"' 
y to a great extent made up W 
their lack of experience. The direc- 
tors worked hard and did a truly w 
mirable job in the short time they h*' 
in which to work. 

The plays are not the only evident 
of our spirit. Anyone who saw d' ( 
basketball game with Loyola will M 
test to this fact. The cheerleader 
started days before the game to nWS 
ufacture new and original yells v<' 
this game. At every opportune 
they ran onto the floor and lea" 
rousing cheer. The students 3PP r ^' 
cited the new yells and showed th* 



than willing to work for the honor of j spirit by their participation 



Sport Hf^3B*llm Section 



FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM CHESTERTOWN. MD, 



PAGE THREE 



Kardash's Sho'men Bow To Greyhounds, 48-32 
In Mason-Dixon Conferenc e Tourney 



Corner 



The Sho'men, as a result of their 
easy triumph over Johns Hopkins, 
50-39, march into the first round of 
the Mason-Dixon Tournament to face 
Loyola for the third time. Last week, 
Loyola, trailing the locals throughout 
the contest, came from behind t 
a fast-moving game, 50-43. Whether 
the Sho'men can match the powerful 
Greyhounds on'the latter's home court 
is hard to tell but, anyway, Coach 
Dumschott's team has everything to 
gain and nothing to lose. Loyola will 
he a heavy favorite to lace the Ma- 
roons who are cast in the role of un- 
iR'i-dog. But with a capacity crowd 
on hand, and intense pressure on the 
Greyhounds, the Sho'men may prove 
very troublesome. 

One factor which probably will a- 
g.-iin appear evident among the Shore- 
men cagers is the definite lack of 
height. Although the locals possess 
several six-footers, these boys, with 
the exception of McNiff, do not seem 
big on the court. Against Loyol 
who by the way, has more height tha 
nny team in the Tournament, the Mi 
roons are at a distinct disadvantage. 
The Greyhounds, in Vic and Fi 
Bock, Bernie Thobe, Barney Gold- 
berg, Jim Nouss and Glushakow have 
»ix men who can snare rebounds. 

This season has been one of ups 
ami downs for the hapless Maroons. 
With a record of ten wins and eleven 
Josses, one tie game; one can hardly 
say that the locals have experienced 
a good season. If it had not been 
for a very poor start, and other tough 
breaks throughout the campaign, the 
Sho'men would have been among the 
leaders in the Mason-Dixon Confer- 
ence. For instance, at the end of the 
first ten games, their record was two 
wins and eight losses; then in the fin- 
al eleven tilts the Sho'men won eight 
fames and lost but three engage- 
ments. It is also interesting to 
note that the hard-luck Sho'men bow- 
pil in three successive games by a 



The fast stepping Loyola quintet, 
which set the pace in the Mason-Dix- 
on Conference, smashed a fighting 
Sho'men team 48 to 32 at Evergreen 
in Baltimore, last night. In this 
game, the first round of the Confer 
ence Tournament, Loyola used hei 
superior height to gain the majority 
of rebounds and thus to control the 
ball. 

The game started as a nip-and 
tuck affair. Stevens was the first to 
score, swishing a long shot from near 
mid-court. Loyola tallied on a lay- 
in shot, then Voith put the Maroons 
ahead qgam by virtue of a field goal, 
The Washington five continued to 
prove more* than ajnatch for the fast 
passing, sharp-shooting Greyhounds 
and pulled ahead to a 13 to 10 lead. 
The league leaders then began to roll 
and the scrappy Sho'men could do lit- 
tle to halt the aerial attack of the 
Baltimore team. At the half the 
Greyhounds commanded a 22 to 18 
lead. 

When the second period began, 
Loyola started to increase her mar? 
gin. Stevens was the only Washing- 
ton player who could shake himself 
free of the opposing guards. He con- 
tinued to sink outside shots and man- 
aged to tally on fast cuts and lay-in 
shots. Trying hard to gain posses 
sion of the ball and turn defeat into 
victory, the Maroons committed num- 
erous fouls which increased Loyola's 
lead. 

Scoring 14 points, Stevens was the 
big gun in the Sho'men attack. Voith, 
playing before a home town crowd, 
received much applause for his snar- 
ing of rebounds, floor work and 
marksmanship. He tallie<r 9 points 
for the losers. Thobe scored 13 
points for the victors. 

In the first game of the evening 
Western Maryland lived up to expec- 
tations by taking a close game, 48 to 
44, from the Blue Hens of Delaware. 
A fast breaking American U. team set 
back Mount St. Mary's 47 to 42. This 
game, although sloppily played, had a 
mere margin of three points. In any M , ■„ „„„,.„,, ' Ai ' I ., * r 

„„ t ri»__t TO_.j i.-_ r,. , .^ ..,,! tnrili-packed ending when the Mounts 

came from behind to tie the score at 
40-all, but the Washington team 
proved to be too much for the up- 
statcrs. Catholic U. nosed out Ran- 
di 



Hopkins Defeat 
Clinches Berth 
In Tournament 



By virtue of their victory over 
Johns Hopkins on Tuesday evening 
by the score of 50 to 39, the Wash- 
ington College cagers gained a berth 
in the Mason-Dixon conference bas- 
ketball tourney which started on 
Thursday. The game was played at 
Evergreen and Washington had the 
edge from start to finish in a very 
sloppy game. 

Franny McNiff and Lew Yerkes 
were the high scorers for the Sho'men 
with 14 and 13 points respectively 
but they were over-shadowed for top 
scoring honors by Bud Tannenbaum, I 
Hopkins' captain who garnered 18 
points for the beaten Blue Jays. At 
only one tinie did Hopkins lead and 
this was at the beginning when they I 
held a 7 to 6 point lead. During 
ost of the game the Sho'men main- 
tained a sizeable lead and the out- 
come was never in doubt. 

The lineup and summary: 



Dutchmen Drop League 

Final To Loyola, 50-43 



Staging a brilliant first half, the 
Sho'men flashed the best brand of ball 
seen on the local court this season 
and threw a scare into the Loyola 
five Saturday night but failed to hold 
this pace and finally succumbed to a 
fresher Greyhound quint by the score 
of 50 to 43. 

The inspired play of the Shore cag- 
ers led to the banishment of McNiff 
and Stevens who played stellar games 
throughout, and whose loss was felt 
in Loyola's last minute drive to vic- 
tory. The scoring was divided among 
six players with Stevens getting 9 
and both Samele and Voith getting 8 
apiece. For Loyola Goldberg was 
high man with 11 and right on his 
heels was Nouss who accounted for 
ten counters. 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builders 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campus Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



SCHUMACHER & SEILER, 

INC. 

Wholesalers of 

Plumbing - Heating Materials 

Baltimore, Maryland 



Washington 


G 


F T 


Samele, f _ . 


4 


1-1 9 


Yerkes, f 


6 


1-1 13 


Stevens, c 


S 


2-3 8 


Gibe, c 





0-1 


McNiff, g 


7 


0-1 14 


Voith, g _ 


3 


0-0 6 


Totals 


23 


4-7 50 


Hopkins 


G 


F T 


Tannabaum, f 


7 


4-5 18 


rtobinson, f _ 


3 


2-2 8 


Wagner, c 


n 


0-0 


Thomas, g _ _ 


3 


0-0 6 


Cnitz, g 


3 


1-4 7 


Totals 


1C 


7-11 39 





E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



CUMBERLAND COAL 
, COMPANY 

Producers Wholesalers 

Retailers 

"Stoko!" Stokers 

217 E. Redwood St. 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



Choose 

Hochschild, Kohn & Co. 

for correct 

Campus and College Wear 



PITTSBURGH PAINTS 
"Smooth As Glass" 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass 
Company 

Baltimore, Maryland 



event, Coach Freddie Dumschott still 
has most of his hair, even though he 
was a very unhappy man many a 
night. 



of the 



To look at the brighter sidi 
picture, however, local rooters poinl 
with glee to the Baltimore U. tilts es 
being their greatest triumphs not- 
withstanding the Delaware, Mount St 
Mary's and Catholic 
was during the late • 



otph-Macon 44 to 39, in the poore 
game of the evening. 



Hi 



that the Maroo 
iselves and began 
Fter victory to wipe 
nt reverberations. 



Loyola G 

F. Bock, f 3 

V. Bock, f 5 

It j Nouss, f o 

f the sea-IGlush'kow, f 2 



s rejuvenated Thobe. C 

reaping victcry ' Price, C _.__ __ 1 

ut the unpleas- Goldberg, g 1 

McDonough, g 3 

McCluming, g 

Rostkowski, g 

Eepetti, g 



"Moose" McNiff and Jim Stevens, 
Mh have shared the spotlight for the 
Sho'men cause and have wound up 
their collegiate careers in sensational 
J'ashion. McNiff, one of the out- 
standing cagers in the State, was the 
iiniln attraction of the Sho'men out- Washington 
"Moose" was all over the floor, Samele, f _ 
ig rebounds off both backboards, Yerke?, f 
dnbbling up the floor, or intercepting! Gibe, f __, 
opponent passes. Without McNiff, j Stevens, c 
t'" 1 Maroons were similar to "a cart McNiff, g 



DON'T FORGET 

STIME'S 

THE FRIENDLY STORE 



Charles Dimmling & Co. 

Quality Meats and Poultry 

Stores and Institutions 

Supplied 

"We are not afraid to boast 
When it comes to tender roast" 

602 S. Broadway, 
Baltimore, Md. 



C0RKHILL 
FRANKS 

ARE GOOD 
ANYTIME 

Every Time! 



■ithout a horse." He was the back- Voith, g ._ 4 1 

"ne of the Sho'men offense and de- Lentz, g 

Cnse. Jim Stevens, although erratic Benjamin, g 

at times, provided additional strength Ruff, g 

'<> the Sho'men offense with his bvil- 

, liant outside shots and "cut in" shots. Totals 14 4 32 

These two boys will be sorely missed Score by halves: 

*>y Coach Dumschott when next bas- Loyola 22 26 — 48 

^tball season rolls around. Washington 18 14 — 32 



For those little things 
you are always needing 
in your room and for 
dress — 

Stop in at — 

FOX'S 

5c to $1.00 Store 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 




Do You Have A 

Tux? 

RENT ONE FOR 

THE DANCE 

-AT— 

Albert L. Wheat 

High Street Phone 251-J 



PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 



1942 



Pegasus To Make 
May 15 Deadline 

Publishing Handicaps Hinder 

Work On The Year Book 

Smith Discloses 



Visits Lambda's frM '™n Fir* Plow ... 



Donald Smith, editor of the Peg- 
asus, expects to meet the May 15 
dateline for the 1942 edition of the 
annual in spite of publishing handi- 
caps. Last week Smith and Lloyd 
Davis, the business manager, made a 
trip to Philadelphia to arrange for an 
earlier publication because of the 
college's accelerated program. The 
publishers, however, are receiving 
similar requests from a number of 
colleges, and could make no definite 
promises- 
Smith and the staff photographer, 
Woodford, are now working on infor- 
mal senior pictures and plan to in- 
clude every senior in a group picture. 
Smith is quite pleased with the pic- 
tures taken by Merin-Baliban earlier 
this year. 



-oo— 



Describes Bird Artists . . . 

(Continued Irom Page 1) 
to Labrador. From 1925 - 1929 he 
served as the Pennsylvania State Orn- 
ithologist, 

Government ornithologists study 
birds from an economic standpoint; 
i. e., they "inspect the habits and diets 
of the birds in terms of dollars and 
cents." Others study the migratory, 
evolutionary, or hereditary aspects of 
birdlife. However, Sutton is more 
interested in their appearance and 
their habits of mating, nesting, feed- 
ing, etc. He went alone to South- 
ampton Island at Hudson's Bay, where 
he wrote his book ESKIMO YEAR. 
He hunted and fished with the Eski- 
mos while compiling his wonderful 
book BIRDS IN THE WILDER- 
NESS. On the Southampton trip, he 
discovered the nest of the "blue 
goose" which had been a mystery for 
years. Also, he discovered the Har- 
ris's sparrow. 

Sutton then travelled southward 
and experienced "the rarest occasion 
in an ornithologist's life," the oppor- 
tunity of witnessing the ivory-billed 
woodpecker in its native haunts. His 
illustrations are scattered all over the 
country in volumes on ornithology. 
He has written four full-sized books, 
two technical and two popular. 




(Continued from Page 1) 
acters were good", evidencing the 
"best preparation" of the three plays. 
Betty Dockhorn, as a slovenly, gum- 
chewing secretary, earned for herself 
the comedienne laurels of the even- 
ing. The audience cowered (?) be- 
hind Mike Alteri's menacing snarl 
and "hair-trigger" weapon. The most 
eagerly awaited scene of the evening 
was the bench scene in "Objections 
Overruled." Everyone now knows 
the technique of "Shorty" Pierce, 
master lover. 



Cole. 



, Nole 



Coleman Nolen, traveling secre- 
tary of the Lambda Chi Alpha Fra- 
ternity, is visiting the local chapter 
and will be in Chestertown until Mon- 
day, March 9. Mr. Nolen has spent 
several years in fraternity work ex- 
clusively and has visited colleges all 
over the United States and Canada 
where the Fraternity's chapters, total- 
ing more than one hundred, are estab- 
lished. 

Mr. Nolen, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Arkansas, took graduate 
work in law at the University of Ne- 
braska for one year before becoming 
Traveling Secretary. At Arkansas 
he headed his chapter and various stu- 
dent organizations including the In- 
terfraternity Council. 



I Usilton's I 

* Funeral Home, Inc. * 



J Phone 72 High St. J 



Science Assembly . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
means of a blackboard drawing, how 
a thermite or incendiary bomb works. 
Then, he ignited a mixture in an iron 
crucible with magnesium ribbon. An 
extremely hot flame occurred melt- 
ing a hole in the crucible. Lastly, 
two apparently blank signs were 
sprayed with a chemical by Pete 
Shinnamon bringing out red and blue 
colors. One said. "Keep 'em Fly- 
ing"; the other said, "That's All 
Folks." 



DANCING? 





....FLOWERS 

ANTHONY, The Florist 

Chestertown, Md. 
Phone 283 



D O R F ' S 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 

High Street 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration 
Phone 48 



Dr. W. H. Moyer 

CHIROPRACTOR 

X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 



Fulton Grand 
Laundry Co. 

Finer Grade Launderers : 
Baltimore, Md. 

Read the ELM 



WILLIAMS 
Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., MARCH 9-10-11 
The Stars Of The Year In The Picture Of 
The Year. 
SPENCER TRACY and 

KATHERINE HEPBURN in 

"THE WOMAN OF THE YEAR" 

Tracy in his first fun role in ages . . . All 
This AND Heuburn, too ... in a picture 
more fun than PHILADELPHIA STORY. 



THUR. - FRI. - SAT., MARCH 12 - 13 - 14 
—BIG TWIN FEATURE PROGRAM— 

"WILD BILL HICKOK RIDES" 

— with — 

BRUCE CABOT - WARREN WILLIAM 

CONSTANCE BENNETT 

— Plus— 

"LAW OF THE TROPICS" 

— with — 

JEFFRY LYNN - CONSTANCE BENNETT 



—NEXT WEEK— 
"THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER" 



XXX*\%\XN%>«\SNXXV«%K%SXX\SN«\VS\\%XX<V«SXVN\\%y 



How to Win Friends 

in one easy lesson 
Treat yourself and others to 
wholesome, delicious Wrigley's 
Spearmint Gum. Swell to chew. 
Helps keep breath sweet, teeth 
bright. The Flavor Lasts. 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 



phone 14 




&RIEF. . . . 

Dramatic Club Schedule 

Henry Maguire, head of the Dra- 
Ljc Club announced last night the 
\ tJ i» for the club this Spring. The 
...Hi.iaU'd program had caused the 
roup to drop one of the proposed 
fesentations. 

On April 17, the club will present 
8-aet play. According to Maguire 
jpring Dance" will probably be 
rtjmatized although the choice is on- 
tentative. 

Three one-act invitation plays will 
e presented early in May, on either 
1C 1st, or 8th. The Dramatic Club 
the University of Delaware will- 
resent one play; the Little Theatre 
| m Wilmington the second; and our 
Dramatic Club will present the 
nird play. 



Dr. Jones Sick 

Dr. Jones, due to an infection of 
he ear, has been absent from Col-* 
incc March 9 and will not re- 
until the twenty-third. Dr. 
Dr. Robinson, and Miss Snod- 
■oss are substituting for him. His 
Inc interfered with his speaking in 
Washington, D. C, at a meeting of 
i,r Washington Alumni Chapter and 
tostern Shore Society. 



Senior Class Dues $3.00 

t the Senior Class meeting on 
'hursday, after Assembly, it was de- 
iilod to set the class dues at $3.00. 
'nincos Kreeger will collect the mon- 
| from the girls and Dave Bartolini 
rom the boys. 

Minor Steele and Wilbert Patter- 
ii ..ill measure the members of the 
iss for their gowns. "Peanut" 
Smith will be in charge of invitations. 
a Blackwood will be Chairman of 
he Decoration Committee. 



PARRIS ILL 

Leonard "Doc" Parris was stricken 
lith appendicitis FridaV morning. He 

is placed in the Kent and Queen 

me's General Hospital. 

Lute Friday his parents removed 
lim to Baltimore for a probable oper- 
ition. 



?ussell Accepts 
Army Position; 
Jones Is Editor 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 




••••• 



JLMlffli ***** 



Vol. XLI. No. 22. 



FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1942 



Price Five Cents 



Lou Startt To Play At Junior Prom; 
Yellow Sheets Meet Stiff Opposition 

Murphy Notes j Choral Assembly Students Favor Blue Books Over 



Band Change By GarnettHigh 
Is Well Arranged 



Present Test System Poll Shows 



Austin Mui-phy, president of the 
Junior class, announced last nignt 
that the Criterions, the Student Or- 
chestra of West Chester State Teach- 
College, will be unable to fulfill 
their contract to play for the Junior 
Prom on March 20. Lew Startt and 
his Orchestra, popular Shore combi- 
nation, have been secured for the oc- 
casion. This change in bands will re- 
duce the price of admission to the 
dance. It is hoped that this lower- 
ng of prices will increase the attend- 
ance at the fete. 

Class Cooperation Necessary 

According to President Murphy, it 
ill be impossigle to finance the prom 
without the strong backing and coop- 
eration of the entire Junior class. At 

special meeting on Wednesday, he 
presented a financial report to the 
class and gave a list of the expenses 
for the forthcoming dance. At that 
time the price of admission to all 
classes was declared to be $2.20, how- 
ever the change of orchestras will re- 
duce the "tariff" to about $1.50. 
Dance Theme To Be Hell 

The theme for the decorations is 
hell." Helen Marie Culver, chair- 
lan of the decoration committee, said 
at the meeting that details had not 
yet been worked out, but she agreed 
that it was an ironic theme for 
dance, the proceeds of which are to 
be given to the Red Cross. 



SPEEDY RECOVERY 
WISHED 

The ELM joins with the en- 
tire student body in wishing 
Miss Mattie a speedy recovery 
and quick -return _to -School. 
Things don't seem right with- 
out her. 



Plans Sessions 



The Glee Club of the Garnett High | 
School, of Chestertown, took charge | 
of the College assembly yesterday, i 
Dr. Mead introduced the group; then,] 
he gave them complete charge of the | 
assembly. Miss Catherine Burgess 1 
Smith, the directoress, was the only: 
adult present. The girl who acted as 
interlocutor showed, through her an- 
nouncements, how completely and 
competently the program had been 
arranged. 

The program was as follows: 

"America", (to tune of ''Finlan- 
dia) — Chorus. 

"The Lord's Prayer" — Girl soloist, 
accompanied by Chorus. 

'Reign Massa Jesus, Reign" — 
Chorus. 

'Fightin' On, Halleluiah" — Male 
Quartet, accompanied by Chorus. 

'Passing By" — Herman Wiley, boy 
soprano. 

"You Gonna Reap Just What You 
Sow" — Chorus. 

"The Land of Gideon" — Chorus. 

"All Through The Night"— Played 
by sextet (four boys and two girls) 
composed of trumpets, cornets, a 
French horn, and a trombone. 

Finale: "French Pastoral" plus the 
Alma Mater — Chorus. 



Vote For Mascot 
For School Team 




Ci^bekct W. Weta Ll.H, 



Long Classes 
Are Planned 
For Summer 



On page four in this issue there is 
a ballot to be used in a vote for the 
College Mascot. 

On this ballot there are three pos- 
sibilities. The American Eagle and 
the Chesapeake Bay Retriever were 
chosen as fitting for the school. The 
Eagle because of the antiquity of the 
school and its connection with the 
Father of Our Country. ^The Re- 
triever, a noble and courageous ani- 
mal, furnishes local color. 



Calvert Jones, editor of the Elm 
till succeed Harry S. Russell as editoi 
>f the Chestertown Enterprise, com- 
pencing with the coming week's is- 
Russell, himself, has accepted 
1 commission as first lieutenant >n 
lie United States Army, and is ex- 
acting assignment to the Public Re- 
gions Branch, Army Air Forces. 

The retiring editor, for 16 years 

o active editor of the paper, has al- 
lowed as business manager over 
he Creator part of this time. Emer- 
N R. Russell, brother of the retiring 

fficial, will now take over the busi- 
ness end of the paper. 

Harry Russell has been ordered to 
jeport to the Chief of the Army Air 
forces in Washington next Wednes- 
lay. 

Jones has been active in newspaper 
pork lor several years and has served 
relief editor of The Enterprise and 
o of the Reocrd-Observor in Cen- 
Seville, The new business manager 
1 also manager of the New Lyceum 
t^atre. 



Bus Line To Elkton Proposed By 
Red Star Line General Manager 



Submitted to the Public Service; 
Commission by Edgar Bennett, gen- 
eral manager, an application for a: 
bus route from Chestertown to Elk- 
ton by the Red Star Lines would be-, 
gin service by March 25th, it was an-! 
nounced today. 

It was learned that the Public Ser-j 



lessly delay the institution of the new 
service. 

The proposed bus schedule would 

connect with 'trains both north and 
south at Elkton in both morning and 
afternoon; allowing plenty of time for 
a round trip visit to Baltimore and 
Philadelphia in one day. The bus 



vice Commission is not considering! would leave here in the morning at 
this proposal as an alternative to the j approximately 7:15 connecting with 
petition which they are considering a south train at 8:36 and a north 
concerning additional train servicel train at 8:37. The bus would return 
out of Chestertown. A member of 'at once, bringing back those passeng- 
that body said today that a ruling 1 ers arriving on the two trains. It 
ould be given on the railroad peti-l would leave Chestertown again at 
tion; but, inasmuch as the question [ 4:20 P. M., meeting a south bound 
nvolves transport out of Maryland | train arriving at 5:47 and a north 
into Delaware, it is thought that the: bound train stopping at Elkton 
final decision, whichever way it went,! 6:12. The bus would get back to 
would be greatly delayed by the In-; Chestertown around 7:30. 
terstate Commerce Commission hear-[ Public Service officials said that it 
ings. Even then it was felt that the j was in their power to order these or 
railroad's disposition to oppose the 'any other trains to stop at Elkton to 
improved schedule could almost end- [insure connections. 



One hour and thirty minutes will 
be the length of each class in summer 
school in a course giving three hours 
credit, according to plans of the Ad- 
ministration. 

Courses granting two credit hours 
will hold one hour sessions. Classes 
will begin at eight o'clock, and will be 
held six days a week; all classes in- 
cluding laboratory periods will be 
scheduled in the morning, afternoons 
thus being free. 

Dr. Mead stated that a bulletin con- 
taining full information regarding 
summer courses and fees is being pre- 
pared and will be published within 
the next ten days. 

Students now in college should 
complete their preliminary registra- 
tion by May 16, before the final ex- 
aminations, Dr. Mead urged. 

Summer activities of fraternities 
will depend upon the conclusions 
reached at the meeting of the War 
Committee of the National Interfra- 
ternity Council held in New York 
Wednesday. Pamphlets will be dis- 
tributed to deans of all colleges by 
this committee advising what actions 
have been taken. 

Sports will be provided, although 
the calendar has not yet been formu- 
lated. Selections will be left up to 
the athletic department. Archery 
and badminton will be offered to the 
girls; in addition there will likely be 
tennis and Softball, and any other 
sport the athletic department may de- 
cide to install. 

Dr. Mead is making arrangements 
with the Chestertown Yacht and 
Country Club for a special rate of stu- 
dent membership. Facilities open to 
members will be swimming, golfing, 
and sailing, if any student member 
wishes to bring his boat along. 

Nothing concerning financial aid to 
students this summer is more definite 
than has been previously announced. 



"We want blue books" was the 
opinion of sixteen out of twenty-five 
students asked if they preferred a re- 
turn to the monthly blue book system 
in preference to the yellow sheet sys- 
tem as it now stands. 

This ELM reporter picked at ran- 
dom twenty-five students and asked 
them a prepared list of questions. 
These questions were not designed to 
trick anyone, but merely were chosen 
in an attempt to determine general 
opinion concerning the new yellow 
sheet system. Males and females, 
members of all the fraternities, non- 
frat students, members of all four 
classes — a cross section of the entire 
school was approached for the qucs- 
tionaire. 

Sludes Favor Announced Testa 

Seventeen members of the student 
body declared that, if announced yel- 
low sheets were given once a week 
(abolishing the almost daily unan- 
nounced quizes), they would favor 
the new system . . . mid-semesters and 
finals included. However, if the in- 
discriminate flood of yellow sheets 
should continue, twenty-three stu- 
dents voiced the opinion that all exr 
animations, mid-semester and final, 
should be abolished. This would fol- 
low the accelerated program recently 
inaugurated at the University of 
Maryland. 

One question asked all the students 
approached by the reporter was, 
"How many yellow sheets did you act- 
ually have last week?" The answ- 
ers varied greatly, with some as high 
as eleven and others as low as three. 
The average was about seven quizes 
for each student. However, all stu- 
dents agreed that last week was a 
particularly light one in regards to 
these tests. \ Professor Dumschott 
was absent for several classes. Dr. 
Jones missed all his classes, and sev- 
eral members of the faculty failed to 
give planned tests because of the 
number of students who went to Bal- 
timore for the basketball games and, 
as a consequence, had little opportun- 
ity for study. 

On the average, it took about thir- 
ty minutes to answer the quizes. 
Here, also, results to the question 
varied greatly. Some yellow sheets 
were hour-long ones, while others 
took merely fifteen minutes. 

Eighteen of those questioned a- 
greed that the students did not over- 
emphasize the yellow menace. Five 
differed on this count. The same 
number, although not in all eases the 
same students, thought that the facul- 
ty underestimated the menace. 
Weekly Quizes Favored 

When asked if they had any "pet" 
plan that seemed more satisfactory 
than the yellow sheet set-up, seven- 
teen favored a system of weekly tests, 
with no finals of any sort. This plan, 
they agreed would satisfactorily cow- 
er all material and yet save time — 
the aim of the accelerated program. 

Only two students were of the opin- 
ion that final examinations should 
cover the work of the entire semester. 
Twenty-three declared, in no uncer- 
(Continued on Page 6) 



PAGE TWO 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, MARCH 13, lj,. 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 

OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

Established 1782 

Published weekly, from September 19 to May 29, except 
holidays, by and for the interests of the student body, faculty 
and alumni of Washington College, the tenth oldest institution 
of higher learning in the United States. Founded at Chester- 
town, Maryland, 1782. 

Anonymous contributions will not be published. Names 
will not be published if confidence is requested. Letters to the 
editor should not exceed 350 words in lengthy 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief J- Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editor Frances Kreeger 

Associate Editor Mary Landon Russell 

Sports Editor J° hn Kardash 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

Dr. H. 0. Werner, Faculty Adviser 



FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1942 

Always The Attack 

In the last war, Marshall Foch sounded the cry, Always the 
Attack. The same battle-cry, a strong offense is the best de- 
fense, is familiar to Americans, chiefly because it has been echo- 
ed so often in football games. 

In the World War the Allies learned that victory belonged 
to the aggressor, to the nation which carried the battle to the 
enemy. Hitler and his Axis mates have consistently followed 
that principle. They have not hesitated to take the greatest 
risks if possible gain was worth the gamble. This is the daring 
warfare that catches the enemy asleep and is the basis of the 
famed Blitzkreig. 

The grave losses that the United Nations have suffered 
may, in part, be laid to the once commonly held belief that it 
would be possible to fight a defensive war and still win. 

France pinned her faith to the Maginot Line, which her 
military leaders said was impregnable. Today she is a beaten, 
starved, enslaved nation. 

England at first believed she could bring Hitler to his knees 
through the use of her classic weapon, the blockade. Today 
Hitler is master of most of Europe and exploiter of almost a\l 
its resources. 

At first Russia, under the fury of the Nazi attack, pinned 
her hopes on defensive positions, such as the once so-called Sta- 
lin line, and beheld bastion after bastion crumple under the as- 
sault of the invader. Not until the fine Russian troops, aided 
by the onset of winter, took the offensive was the legend of 
Nazi invincibility shattered. 

The Commandos, those daring volunteers who are perpe- 
tual thorns in the sides to the Nazis, have been striking swiftly 
and unexpectedly. One time they flaunt the enemy in northern 
Norway — a few days later they raid southern Italy. If we can 
believe reports, the Commandos 'have been more than success- 
ful in every attempted raid. 

The fall of Singapore is in direct opposition to the above. 
The greatest naval base ever built, Singapore in its fall gives a 
tragic example of the fallacy of offensive war against the speed 
of the modern military machines. British believed the Malayan 
jungles would make land attack on that mighty fortress impos- 
sible. Yet the Japs roared through that very door. 

Here in our own country, most of us have been defense 
minded instead of war minded. The great natural barriers 
presented by our oceans have given us a feeling of security. We 
took pride in our latent power, assuming that no nation, least of 
all Japan, would dare attack us. And so decades of defensive 
thinking, inaction, avoiding unpleasant truths preached by 
far-sighted few, have lead to a grim series of debacles to which 
we and our allies have been subjected 




WHAT IF WE 
PUT OFF" 



If American armies decided to "put 
off" fighting for a week; if our naval 
forces determined to halt the hunt fo 
enemy submaries until next month- 
how long would America be free? 

If the producer* of armament 
"just forgot" to turn out guns 
and tanks and planes; if Amer- 
ican generals "didn't have time" 
to map our campaigns — how 
long would America remain an 
independent democracy? This 
i* a war of minutes; procrastin- 
ation has become synonymous 
with perfidy. And yet . . . 

While we can't think of one persoi 
who hasn't commented favorably oi 
United States Defense Savings Bonds 
and Stamps, and who hasn't said 
I'm going to start buying Defense 
Stamps without fail!" — we can think 
of several people who have "delayed 
their purchasing," who "won't start 
buying for a few days," or who had 
"just forgotten" to buy a stamp. 

V IS FOR 
VICTORY 

We're not writing this because we 
feel that the students of Washington 
College believe that V stands for 
Vacillation. Rather, we want 
make plain our assurance that it is 
vitally important for students to 
vest their dimes asd quarters in the 
United States as wholeheartedly, 
legularly, and as systematically 
their parents invest their pay-day 
dollars. 

Wholeheartedly, regularly, and 
systematically ■ . . just as our 
war is more than one isolated in- 
fantry attack; just as it requires 
much more than one concerted 
naval drive; and just as it ne- 
cessitates infinitely more than a 
single bombing flight — every- 
thing we do must be continuous, 
unfaltering, and constant. 

There is more to this war than vic- 
tory; America is fighting not only for 

today, but for tomorrow . . . for fu- 
ture peace and for the future good of 
all peoples. The Bonds and Stamps 
we buy are not only fighting the war, 
but fighting for the peace. 



THIS WEEK'S- 



PERSONALITY 

—ON THE CAMPUS 



This week we'd like you to meet 
Mrs. Washington", Minor Steele. A 
born leader and a charming person 
to know, Minor is one of the out- 
standing personalities on the campus. 

Minor was born in Hartford. Con- 
necticut, on July 31, 1920. She 
started school at the Noah Webster 
grammar school in Hartford but mov- 
ed to Farmington where she attended 
the Farmington Public School. Lat- 
er her family moved to Rome, N. Y„ 
and she graduated from the Fort 
Stanwix School. Incidentally, this is 
the historic place where the Ameri- 
can flag was first raised in battle — so 
she informs us. Poor Minor had an 
awful time going to Junior High 
School — she says she almost froze to 
death and had to stop in neighboring 
houses to get warm. However, she 
braved the 40 below zero weather and 
made a name for herself as the fii 
girl to be elected as the president of 
the Student Council of the Rome Jun- 
ior High School. At the Rome Free 
Academy Minor was a member of the 
National Honor Society. She seems 
to have had a moving good time be- 
cause she next moved to Baltimore 
where she attended Girl's Latin 
School. Here she became the editor 
of the first school paper, and was 



esident of her class. After grad& 
ation her family moved to Havre ^ 
Grace and Minor came to Washing^ 
College. 

Since her arrival here she has takf 
an active part in almost every pf^, 
of college life. She is a member c( 
the Dramatic Club and has starred ii 
several of its productions. Minor j 
a member of Alpha Omicron Pi snrot 
ity and was elected president in hei 
junior year and was reelected to tin 
presidency in her senior year. Lit 
year she was president of the Pm 
hellenic Council. In her junior ycy 
she was Feature Editor of the ELM 
and in her second and third yeai 
was class editor of the PEGASUS 
Minor was elected to the Athleti 
Board in her sophomore year and sh 
has held this position for the rest o| 
her college career. She has been llij 
English assistant for the past 
years, and was awarded the Burehiwl 
Scholarship last year and again tliii 
year. 

Minor is now living in Rome, 
less she moves again before this issat 
is off the press. She especially like] 
winter sports and reads and writes a 
her hobbies, After her graduation in 
May, Minor would like to get ;i joins 
Rome. 




Who Reads Editorials 

Glancing through ten college newspapers picked at ran- 
dom, we found that seven of these printed editorials of purely 
local interest, two carried editorials of a religious nature, and 
only one ventured an editorial on national affairs. While this 
uncritical survey is porbably not at all representative, it does 
bring up the old question of college editors: "Who reads our 
editorials?" 

Custom behoves us not to hang dirty wash on the editorial 
line for fear some other college, professional group, or un- 
friendly spectator, may suspect that something has gone wrong 
down at Podunk U. 

As much as possible we do not discuss national issues for 
fear of commiting the College administration to a policy with 
which they may not concur. 

Most editorials about the grand future of youth are as ex- 
tinct as the dodo, and those about our present opportunities nev- 
er leave the typewriter. 

Usually editorials for the ELM are written during a brain 
storm of the editor or are assigned by him to some member of 
the staff. As much as possible we write on views of the stu> 
dents. Prudence, however, waves a warning finger; we must 
draw the line between student opinion and private opinion. How 
well we succeed is open to speculation. Your opinions are in- 
vited. 

Editorials are to inform, suggest, or complain. They make 
the policy of the paper. The editorial Always The Attack 
not at all unusual. Ones similar in content have been run 
newspapers all over the country — in metropolitan dailies, 
county weeklies, in the college publications. This is America, 
the common people of this country, expressing their opinion on 
a subject of terrific importance to all. 



THE WORLD 
TO COME 



Students of American colleges are 
thinking about this world to come; 
many of them are fighting for it. We 
who remain here are talking about it, 
eading about it, planning for it. We 
mist also help pay for it, just as all 
Americans must help. 

The dimes and quarters we set 
aside are important to the war 
effort, yes; but only if they are 
put aside regularly and syste- 
matically. Only if they reflect 
both the urgency of paying for 
this war, and the continuous, 
dynamic philosophy behind it. 
Make a pledge to yourself. Re- 
membering that our search in the 
seas and the sky is continuous, that 
the flow of machines and munitions is 
never-ending, pledge yourself to fall 
in line with America. Start buying 
Defense Stamps today. Start buy- 
ing them regularly. And do not wav 
er from your course. ODK has them. 
So long and thirty. 



The Editor for this 
Aycock. "Doc" 
week's Editor. 



Jim 

next 



Dear Diary. 

Saturday — Lucky me. I got a bid 
the Pan-Hell Danee. Arrived 
bright and early and it was a swellel- 
egant affair. I was sort of worried 
about the orchestra but it turned out 
to be good. The girls sure did look 
pretty. But, there's no reason why 
they shouldn't. This was the first 
time this year they've had a chance to 
wear those new dresses. And the de- 
corations — Stardust — there wasn't 
much dust but there sur'e were lots 
of stars. Attractice too. Pepper 
Asner certainly has improved since 
we saw him on the Kitty Club at the 
Hip. The intermission parties were 
swell. Of course, I could only go to 
one of them but it had all that one 
could desire. 

The dances reserved for each of 
the various sororities were funny. 
Someone must have thought the A. 
0. Pi's were jitterbugs. Couldn't 
help but notice that while one soror- 
ity was dancing, the members of the 
other two would sit back and whisper. 
Admiring their dresses I guess. 
Would have felt bad about not get- 
ting back until the next-to-the-last 
dance but no one else got back soon- 
er. Wilson Reidy did it again. 
Seems to me a lot of Reid Hall girls 
are going to be disappointed when 
the corps of hometown girls move in 
for the Inter-Frat hop. 

Bought another Defense Stamp 
from Rufus Johnson the other day. 
We got to talking about the value of 
them. The editor of the ELM walk- 
ed in and was so interested in our dis- 
cussion that he wrote his whole col- 
umn on the subject. We finally got 
around to the Junior Prom that's com- 
ing up next Friday. Seems as 
though it's going to be a big affair. 
Right while we were talking, Rufe got 
his tux out to send to the cleaners. 
Looks like there might be a crowd 
there. Austin Murphy, president of 
the Junior Class says there ain't gon> 
na' be any corsages allowed so I 
guess that'll cut down on expenses 
right much. 



The 
Letterbox 



Dere Edyter, 

I ain't got no perticlar gripe ta tel 
ya about, but I wuld like to krw 
sumthin about a few things goir 
roun here. 

Ya know them ther pots in BD 
Smith that da fellas wuz ta thr< 
butts and stuff in? Well, I wis 
they wuld use them things, cuz the 
it would be eazyer fer me ta get 
week's smokin, cuz all I wuld haff t 
do is pick out da long butts al 
once, instid of lookin all over da 
and stoopin over once fer ivry one 
git. Fer too years I've kipt misel 
in smokes thisaway and now all <* 
fellas step on 'em. So, Edytei 
woant ya pleeze see if you can git d 
boys and da wimim, two, ta put the 
butts in them pots? Not only 
me, but da bildin wuld look nicei 
iffen it didn't have butts (only da 1H 
tie ones, but ther is alwuz plenty u' 
them) layin all over. 

And say, Edyter, youre purty in 
flooenshul aroun here. Culd 
pleeze git sumthin dun about 
quiet hour thet is supposed to be '•> 
da Men's Dormitorys? About 
quietest things in da halls during 4 
quiet hour is da radiaters, whlfl 
hardly ever git warm enuff ta n 00 * 
enyhow, and da man who is suppo-' 
ta see thet da noiz is stopt. It fl" 1 
thet I mind da noiz so much, d" 
when a feller doan even hear a S°f 
m ogram on hiz radio which is blarir. 
I rebel. So, Edyter, woant 
pleeze try ta git jist a littul bit 
quiet in the quiet hour? 

Wait a minit, Edyter, I got so* 
guid neus for ya. Remember a c0 
pie uv weeks ago we wuz talkin abo' 
why doant we git a littul more 
watter in the evein, Well, sir, f er * 
last too days we've had enuff hot Sj 
ter each day fer about a duzen 
in Middul Hall to bath before dim 
Gettin good, eh! 

Well, I gotta go study up * 
more fer a sykologie yella sheet, 
yrs, trooly. 
Georgie the Grip 



■■ 



:<■>' 



FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



PAGE THREE 



New Invention 
Startles College 
In Wee Hours 

Culprits Pledge Not To Over 
Sleep Again 

by Lyle Johnston 

Friday, March 6, at 1.30 A. M., 

just one hour and a half after mid 

Kl, every be)] on the campus start 

ringing I The source of the trou 

He was in the room of Rudy, "Otts" 

j "Hacky." By force of habit, Mr. 

Brown immediately ran into this 

'oom to discover the source. After 

TiiiL-h explaining by the three "cul- 

Irits", Mr. Brown said that he would 

end the "boys" over to investigate 

he next day. 

It seems that the three boys were 
yint; in bed discussing the fact that 
most of their cuts were used up, main- 
y because they couldn't get up in the 
ming. Whereupon, Hacky jump- 
out of bed, ran upstairs, and yank- 
the faulty bell from its hinges. 
The others stood aghast while he pro- 
seeded to nail the instrument to the 
rail. He explained his plan. The 
toys had rigged up a "timeclock" 
which rings alarm, starts radio, and 
[urns on light for whenever they set 
Therefore, Hacky wanted to hook 
it up with the bell, also. Somehow, 
lome wires got crossed and rang all 
the bells; instead of the normal 16 
Volts, the wall-socket furnished 110 
V..H-. 

The Fraternity houses wondered 
what was coming off. It is rumored 
hat Dean Bradley and Mother Wil- 
on, expecting a fire, lined the girls 
up with towels around their heads and 
raited until they learned the truth. 

Mr, Brown later found this tacked 
on the bell: 

PLEDGE 
"In these times of confusion and 
rmoil, in these times of political 
mmposities, in these times when 
"en have hatred toward one another, 
'bat would be better than to make 
men laugh? We have the courage to 
Bake men laugh, and if we must be 
mnished for this courage, then we 
an accept our punishment philoso- 
phically, knowing that we have left a 
lei'itage of hearty laughter behind. 
'In a few words, we determined not 
oversleep another morning in spite 
uf bell and high water." 

(Signed) 
Arthur Howard. 
Charles Rothermel. 
Rudolph Parks. 



Debaters Drop 
Intercollegiate 
Card This Year 

Will Enter National Contest On 
Inter-American Affairs 



Razor Blades, Used Tubes 
To Be Collected By 0. D. K. 



The Debate Club has dropped their 
regular schedule of inter-collegiate 
debating for the rest of the semester 
However, it has decided to enter the 
National Extempore - Discussion Con 
test on Inter-American affairs. The 
main objective of the contest is to im- 
plement the Good Neighbor Policy. 
AH United States colleges and univer- 
sities are eligible. The district con- 
ferences are to be held prior to April 
1; the regional conferences prior to 
April 23; and the National final Con- 
ference in Washington, D. C, on May 
14. 

An hour and a half prior to each 
contest each speaker draws a topic 
from a set furnished by the National 
Director's Office. Then, he develops 
the topic in the remaining time at a 
library. The speeches are limited to 
a certain number of minutes. Topics 
for discussion will cover "Pan-Amer- 
ican history, geography, communica- 
tion, peoples, and military prepara- 
tions, together with commercial, cul- 
tural and ecomonic relations." Each 
judge, without consultation, chooses 
the order in rank of the speakers. He 
is to consider the following points in 
making his selections: intellectual 
equipment, personality, practicabili- 
ty, relevancy to topic, and directions. 

Any bona fide undergraduate stu- 
dent in any United States college or 
university is eligible. The Contest 
Management will be responsible for 
all necessary expenses to and from 
the regional and National Confer- 
ences. The delegates from the six or 
seven regional conferences who par- 
ticipate in the National Conference 
will be rewarded with "a specially 
conducted tour of South America dur- 
ing the summer of 1942." 

For details see Bob Holdt, presi- 
dent of the Debate Club. 



With The 



Greeks 



S. S. O. had a two-fold purpose, in 
their meeting on March 5. First, 

they initiated the news members into 
the club. Second they had a ban- 
quet in Hodson Hall. 



Victor and Blue Bird 
Latest Dance Records 

SHORE RADIO and 
AUTO SUPPLY 



ODK announced this week a drive 
f«r the collection of used toothpaste 
ubes, shaving cream tubes, razor 
Jladcs, and cigarette tin foil. The 
ODK men will place convenient col- 
lection boxes in each of the dormi- 
'"! h and fraternity houses. Full 
^operation is expected from the stu- 
dent body. 

yfield Kirby and Omar Jackson, 
recently tapped by ODK, were ini- 
iated at the meeting Monday night. 



The Beauty Bar 

Welcomes you 
To Its 

Service 

Phone 302 
Chestertown 



Sharrer Probable Editor 



Norman Sharrer will probably be 
editor of the College Handbook to be 
Published this spring, Dr. Werner an- 
nounced today, for he was the only 
'tudent candidate for the position at 
Tuesday's meeting. 

Official action will be taken by the 

card of Student Publications at its 

p xt meeting. 



SCHUMACHER & SEILER, 

INC. 

Wholesalers of 

Plumbing - Heating Materials 

Baltimore, Maryland 



LIGHT... 

...POWER 

From 

Chestertown 
Electric Light 
and Power Co. 

. . . Phone 333 



Theta Chi 

Last Monday night Beta Eta Chap- 
ter held its annual election of officers 
Those elected are as follows: Presi 
dent, Albert Mooney; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Elroy Boyer; Secretary, Gene 
Johnson; Treasurer, Harry Roe; Mar 
shal, Martin Warther; First Guard, 
Harry Slade; Second Guard, Bill Roe; 
Chaplain, Gilbert "Pook" Conant; 
Librarian, Paul Ruark; Historian, 
Frank Evans. 

A new radio-record player has been 
purchased for the house and is being 
enjoyed by all. 

Those pledges who have recently 
been initiated are: Robert H. Thaw- 
ley, '43, Denton, Maryland; Robert 
Garrison, '42, Crisfield, Maryland ; 
Donald Horner, '42, Quantico, Mary- 
land. This brings our membership 
up to 23, the largest in the history of 
the chapter. 



Where Were 
You?... 

We, like the entire college, wish to 
say how eagerly we are awaiting Miss 
Mattie's recovery, for without her 
school is not the same. 

George and Lucilla have finally 
achieved the lower regions — of Reid 
Hall. Chinese checkers were the 
drawing card. The K. A.'s and then- 
pledges had a fierce game Sunday af- 
ternoon — but, to everyone's surprise, 
the pledges won! 

Items: 

Assembly was the best had all year 
— Sorority Dance a great success — 
Junior Prom dubious — Several per- 
sons on the campus are open to any 
and all suggestions on "get rich 
quiek" schemes! 

Ask Dr. Kline what's happening to 
the younger generation, plus his de- 
finition of lalapalooza. The boys can 
be divided into two groups now — 
those with their arms in slings and 
those with just their arms. _The 
sling ones are the baseball boys! 



Dr. Ford found his desk occupied 
by a two-year old boy the other day 
and was slightly puzzled as how to 
proceed. Also several of the 
"Profs" have acquired bicycles — 
quite snazzy — eh? 

Corley's theory (radical) kind of 
got mixed up with the Civil War — so 
the North won! Congratulations to 
all the new officers in fraternities, 
sororities and clubs. 

The benches should be out soon 
'cause Springtime is just around the 
corner and, due to the war, has been 
pushed up a couple of weeks — we 
hope! 



Alpha Omicron P. 

Sigma Tau Chapter of Alpha Omi- 
cron Pi held its elections Monday ev- 
ening of officers for the 1942-1943 
term. President, Betty Dockhorn; 
Vice-President, Margaret Ann Dukes; 
Treasurer, Eleanor White; Corres- 
ponding Secretary, Eleanor Harnisch- 
fcger; Recording Secretary, Mildred 
Powers; Rushing and Social Service 
Chairman, Anne Boiling; Panhellenic 
Representative, Joan Johnston; His- 
torian, Ruth Johnson; Study Plan Of- 
ficer, Betty Nash; Press Agent, Pete 
Hammond; Door Keeper, Marie 
Thornton; Assistant Treasurer, Alice 
Sutherland. 

Mrs. Rudolph 0. Tull has accepted 
an invitation from Sigma Tau Chap- 
ter to become one of its recognized 
patronesses. 



CHESTERTOWN LUMBER 
AND MILL WORKS 

Contractors and Builders 

Lumber, Mill Work and 

Builders' Supplies 

E. S. HOLLINGER, Prop. 

Phone 5 



CHESTERTOWN 
I C E COMPANY 

"Everything Needed 

For Refrigeration" 
Phone 48 



T 
Remember 

BILL 
BENNETT'S 

▲ 



PARENTS- 
while IN TOWN SPEND THE NIGHT AT 

THE SOPHIE FISHER INN 

Rooms With Private Bath Dining Room 

Route 213 



Usilton's 
Funeral Home, Inc. 



* Phone 72 



High St. > 




Do You Have A 

Tux? 

RENT ONE FOR 

THE DANCE 

-AT— 

Albert L. Wheat 

High Street Phone 251-J 




Washington College Teams 
Reach Out-Of-Town Contests 




Safely 



Via 



Red Star Motor Coaches, Inc. 





PAGE FOUR 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 



194! 



Miss Mattie In 
Hospital After 
Bike Accident 

Miss Mattie Whi taker, upon whose 
shoulders Washington College rest: 
decided to save shoe leather for na- 
tional defense by riding a bicycle 
back to college Wednesday at 1:00. 

Everything was going splendidly as 
Miss Mattie pediled her way up the 
walk, but when she passed the library 
she decided to atop — by jumping off. 
The peddle tore her ankle and blooJ 
gushed forth. Dave Bartolini, a by- 
stander, tied the wound with his 
handkerchief. He and Joe Sutton 
and one unidentified student carried 
her to Dutch Dumschott's office, who 
cleaned the wound. 

Miss Mattie was then taken to the 
hospital where she, without a whim- 
per, suffered the placing of nine stit- 
ches in the cut. She probably will 
remain in the hospital for a week and 
probably will not return to college 
for two weeks, 

As the press will do, we crashed the 
hospital about five o'clock that even- 
ing in hopes of first hand news, but 
the nurse chased us out because Miss 
Mattie was in the middle of telling 
them of her accident. 



BALLOT 
On Monday, March 16, all students desirous of voting 
for the College Mascot please present this ballot, filled 
out, at the ELM office between 1:15 and 4:15. 
VOTE FOR ONE 



AMERICAN EAGLE 



CHESAPEAKE BAY RETRIEVER 



OWN CHOICE 



The Historical Society has decided 
to discontinue all of its lectures. The 
Student Council accepted the recent- 
ly drafted constitution of the Society. 
April 9, there will be two historical 
movies about Australia and, also, the 
American Indians plus a comedy toj^ 
be held in the Science Building. 



Country Club Establishes 
Extra Summer Membership 
For Benefit Of Students 



Garnett Chorus 
Receives Praise 
Of Assembly 

by C. E. Valentine 

Yesterday morning the assembly- 
goers witnessed one of the best em- 
bryo Negro choruses on the Eastern 
Shore. We might even include the 
Eastern Seaboard, since Maryland 
has well over its complement of fine 
Negro voices. 

The directoress evidently not only 
knows music but can teach it. And 
she has the material; but definitely! 
The chorus is composed of sixteen 
boys, twelve girls, one boy soloist and 
a girl announcer. The entire group 
presented a pleasing sight on the 
stage; the girls dressed in white 
blouses, blue skirts and white socks; 
the boys in their best Sunday-to-to- 
meetin's. 

The program consisted mainly of 
Negro spirituals and hymns, very ably 
announced by a young lady with ex- 
cellent elocution, evidently coached 
also by the directoress. The first 
number was AMERICA to the music 
of FINLANDIA, the well known tone 
poem, finishing off fittingly with the 
LORD'S PRAYER. After a hymn, 
the boys quartet sang two spirituals. 
This was followed by another number 
from the chorus. Then a young 
Freshman boy sang beautifully 
PASSING BY, a lovely, well-known 
lyric. 

Then came the surprise of the day 
— a brass sextet composed of four 
boys and two girls playing ALL 
THROUGH THE NIGHT. This was 
just like serving an elegant desert to 
a delicious chicken dinner. 

The singing of their Alma Mater 
as a finale seemed to sum up entirely 
and conclusively that the group was 
not only well trained, but had that in- 
defatigable spirit that is so essential 
to good singing in such groups. We 
might say, a bit shame-facedly, that 
our own organization could well pro- 
fit by observing the wonderful bit of 
singing done by the Garnet High 
School Glee Club. 

It is difficult to realize that this 
group is not sponsored by the State 
Board of Education, but is an idea of 
the directoress entirely. This active 
voluntary work right here in our own 
community certainly deserves all the 
praise and encouragement that can be 
showered upon it. 



At the suggestion of President 
Mead, the Board of Directors of the 
Chester River Yacht and Country 
Club have established a special 
"Washington College Student Sum- 
mer Membership." 

Such membership will include the 
usual club priviledges — clubhouse, 
golf course, and swimming from the 
dock. Some boys may want to have 
small sail boats here for summer, too, 
for regatta racing. It is expected 
that some may desire to take advant- 
age of these priviledges before the 
summer term opens. Therefore, 
"summer membership" will run from 
May first to the end of August. Cost, 
$10. Further details will be an- 
nounced later when worked out. 



PAUL'S 

Shoe Repair 

Shop 



Sport and Dress Clothing 
For The Student 

BONNETT'S 
DEPT. STORE 



Clab Drops Lectures -M-«-»4-x~x~«-!->">«-i-»*«««^> 

JEWELRY 

The Lasting Gift] 

Washington College 
Belts and Buckles 

$2.25 up 

FINE WATCHES 

JEWELRY 

SILVER and GIFTS 



E. S. ADKINS & CO. 

Everything Needed 

for 

Building 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 



phone 14 



Come In Today 

It Is A Pleasure To Serve $ 

You 

NELSON J.FORNEY 

Jeweler 
CHESTERTOWN, Md. 



According to the 1939 census there 
were about 128,000 manufacturers in 
the United States whose annual vol- 
ume of business was under $100,000. 



MACK'S 

RADIO 

SHOP 
Kent News Building 



PAINT 

for EVERY need 

"Time-Tested Products" 

The Glidden Company 

21 N. Liberty Street 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



A. S. TURNER & SONS 

The Firestone Store 

—SPORTING GOODS— 

Tennis Racquets, Tennis Balls, Footballs, Basketballs, 

Flashlight Batteries, Electric Light Bulbs 

FILL UP WITH GOOD GULF GASOLINE HERE 

High Street 



PENNINGTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Expert Contractors - Builders 

Phone 305 - 288 — Campus Ave. 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



CUMBERLAND COAL 
COMPANY 

Producers Wholesalers 

Retailers 

"Stokol" Stokers 

217 E. Redwood St. 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



The total American income this 
year will be about 89^ billion dol- 
lars. This is 7 billion more than it 
was in 1929 the previous high. 



NEW LYCEUM THEATRE 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 

MON. - TUES. - WED., MARCH 16-17-18 

The Funniest Film Of The Day 

Ten Times Funnier Than The Play 

BETTY DAVIS - ANN SHERIDAN 

MONTY WOOLLEY 

— in — 

"THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER" 

THURSDAY-FRIDAY, MARCH 19-20 

EDWARD G. ROBINSON-GEORGE RAFT 

MARLENE DIETRICH 

— in — 

"MANPOWER" 

It's got Filmdom's Most Dynamic Three- 
some. The T. N. T. star combination in a 
picture that packs a real wallop. 

SAT., MARCH 21— TWO BIG HITS 

BILL ELLIOTT - TEX RITTER 

— in — 

"NORTH OF THE ROCKIES" 

— Plus— 

"BULLETS FOR O'HARA" 

— with — 
JOAN PERRY - ROGER PRYOR 

NN\\%N%\VVVS\V\S\N\\\V\V\%\\NN\\.V»\\\\\\^V<.\\\\\V,V\ 



The 
Stain Drug Co. 

Chestertown 

Is Proud of Its 
Important Part 

In The Life 
of Your College 



For years this Drug Store has 
been the prescription store for 
Washington College students. 

This in itself is an honor and 
we are proud of the confidence 
your college physician has 
placed in our ability to capably 
fill your prescriptions. 

We also specialize in: 
WHITMAN'S CANDY SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

COSMETICS GIFT CARDS 

COMPLETE LINE OF MAGAZINES 

We Invite Your Patronage 



High Street 



Phone 30 



Sport 



£==_&=; 



Secti 



ion 



FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1942 



THE WASHINGTON ELM CHESTERTOWN, MD„ 



PAGE FIVE 



K 



ARDASH'S 
ORNER 



By, 

John 

Kardash 



The Mason-Dixon Tournament held 
just recently turned out to be a suc- 
cessful experiment. On three suc- 
ive nights, a large crowd was on 
hand to observe the Loyola Grey- 
iiniiTids vanquish Washington, Amer- 
ican U. and Western Maryland in 
thnf. order. Emil "Lefty" Rettz. 
chui r man of the affair, not only 
landled the Championships in fine 
itylc but also led his team to ult: 
mate victory. Loyola packed too 
much reserve strength which proved 
o he the decisive factor in all its 
ill;. Vie and Franny Bock, Frannie 
MwDonough, Jim Nouss and Nut 
(Jlushitkow were mainly responsibl 
for the powerful Greyhounds' brill 
nat performances. 

On the opening night. Coach Fred- 
lie Dumschott's charges, unfort 
itely, had to face the Green 
Gray champs. But at the end of the 
trst half, spectators were indeed 
ilcnsantly surprised at the locals tcn- 
slional playing. The Sho'men mat- 
hed the Greyhounds point-for-point 
luring this stanza which ended 21-17 
■ favor of the latter. Then in the 
innl period, Loyola had the more 
capable reserves to replace their star 
lerformers, and more significant was 
he fact that they maintained the 
row margin lead until the starters 
were fully rested to again roll up ad- 
■itional points. It was a valiant ef- 
ort on the part of the scrappy Ma- 
joons who displayed a very fast-mov- 
ng attack. 

The Semi-finals were dull affairs 
with Loyola and Western Maryland, 
wording to early anticipatory think- 
er, emerging with two easy tri- 
imphs. But in the finals, Loyola, 
.farting off like a house-afire, led the 
["errors at the end of the initial half, 
25-14. In the last half, Western 
Maryland began an exciting Corne- 
ll,, only to see their captain, Irv 
liasi, leave the game due to four per- 
onal fouls. At this point, Loyola 
suite to life with a furious assault 
ieh resulted in a definite end to the 
pec ta tors' visions of a close game. 
Ntus, Loyola concluded a great sea- 
on with a magnificent exhibition of 
jlteresting basketball. 
A random selection of an All-Star 



MOVIE... 

THEN, OF COURSE 

...DRINK 



,rnament 
of Vic 
Western 

Scanlon 
Stevens 
ck, Loy 




IN THE COLLEGE 
ATMOSPHERE 

GILL'S 



Team based strictly on To 
games would be composed 
Bock, Loyola, and Irv Biasi, 
Maryland, at guards; Dick 
Catholic U., center; Jim 
Washington, and Franny B. 
ola, at forwards. Others deserving 
honorable mention includ 
ough and Thobe, Loyola; Runcie, Del- 
aware; Byham, American U.; Har. 
kins, Mt. St. Mary's. 

Next season, Coach Dumschott ha; 
three of his star veterans returning 
around whom he can build his team. 
Lew Yerkes, Frank Samele and Jerry 
Voith who turned in some outstand- 
ing performances should form a for- 
midable nucleus. Among' the re- 
serves expected to be back are Jim 
Juliana, Frank Gibe, Bob Ruff, Gil 
Conant, Carl Erutz, Norm Tarr, Val 
Lentz. Frank Samele finished fourth 
in the final scoring standings with a 
grand total of 240 points. Bernie 
Travis, sensational Maryland for- 
ward had a spectacular sum of 327 
points to finish far ahead of the field. 
Ed Mogowski, Western Maryland 
center, was in second place. It is in- 
teresting to note that Mogowski was 
a great disappointment in the Tourn- 
ament to many spectators. Ed, in 
the Loyola game, was a rather 1 poor 
exhibition and lacked fire and spirit. 
With baseball just around the cor- 
ner, grapevine reports seem to find 
the Sho'men nine shaping up fairly 
well at this early date. The Ma- 
roons probably will encounter difficul- 
the pitching corps. However, 
Coach Kibler has some fine looking 
Freshmen prospects to work on and 
develop at least one meal ticket. Al- 
though the season will be shortened, 



K. A. Pledges 
Sink Actives 
In Final Rally 

With quite a bit of varsity mater- 
ial in the lineup the Kappa Alpha 
pledges overwhelmed the actives in a 
last minute rally 55 to 49. The 
game from start to finish was a nip 
and tuck affair with the lead changing 
hands quite frequently. 

Timer Bill Paca tried time and 
again to call the game just when the 
actives would forge ahead but the 
pledges, aware of treachery, posted 
their own timekeeper. "Sleeper 
play" George Burtz was high scorer 
for the pledges with 14 points, and he 
claims he could have had 44 but was 
taking it easy on the actives. Jim 
Stevens remarked after the game that 
he thought they were using the wrong 
kind of ball and uniforms. "Honey" 
McNiff was having a grand time fak- 
ing and passing himself right off the 
court while Jerry Voith clowned 
throughout the game. 

The actives played inspired ball led 
by sharpshooting Dave Bartolini who 
passed and dribbled the pledges sil- 
He was ably assisted by lanky 
Frank Macielag whose backboard 
work was superb. The entire active 
team played well but were weakened 
by the absence of high-scoring Bill 
Paca who made the mistake of cele- 
brating before and not after the 
game, 



GIRLS' 

SPORTS 

BY 

Fran Kreeger 



baseball fa 
citement a: 



ns should find 
.1 thrills. 



Dr. W. H. Moyer 

CHIROPRACTOR 
X-ray Laboratory 

201 Washington Ave. 



DON'T FORGET 



STIME'S 



THE FRIENDLY STORE 




When Away From Home 

Why Not Still Enjoy 

A Home-Cooked 

Meal. 

Our prices are reason- 
able, and if the food or 
service is not satisfactory, 
please tell US. 

Open 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. 

Your Patronage 
Appreciated 

KENT 
GRILLE 

CHESTERTOWN 



Charles Dimmling & Co. 

Quality Meats and Poultry 

Stores and Institutions 

Supplied 

"We are not afraid to boast 
When it comes to tender roait" 

602 S. Broadway, 
Baltimore, Md. 



For those little things 
you are always needing 
in your room and for 
dress — 

Stop in at — 

FOX'S 

5c to $1.00 Store 



Last Thursday night, the Junior 
Army team came through with a- 
nother victory. This time they de- 
feated the Freshman White team 26- 
G. On the same night, the Freshman 
Red team defeated the Sophomore 
White team 23-8. This was the first 
loss for the Sophomore White team, 
however the Freshmen Red team looks 
as though it is headed for the finals. 
Take this from one who was defeated 
by them. 

On Tuesday night, the Senior B 
team put up a good fight against the! 
Freshman Reds. The seniors lost 16- j 
20. Too bad, Ellen couldn't make it j 
that night. 

The Junior Army was defeated by 
the Junior Navy 25-5. This game 
was also played on Tuesday night. It 
must also be remembered that the 
Junior Navy team was the champion 
team of last year. 



41 Candidates 
Answer Call 
For Baseball 

Early this week Coach Tom Kibler 
served notice to all baseball enthusi- 
asts to report for duty. Forty-one 
candidates turned out and began 
loosening up their arms and muscles 
for the approaching season. 

Among those who turned out wore 
the following : infielders — Schvoeter, 
Cohen, Alteri, Hastings, English, 
Svec, Ruff, Loll, Roe, Bosc, Dowling 
and Kardash; outfielders — Samele. 
Messick, Prettyman, Benjamin, Par- 
ris, Slade, Lentz, Nowak, Stevens and 
Brutz; pitchers — Thawley, Derringer, 
Lynch, Voith, Maguire, Tomlinson," 
Twopeck, Stromberg, Gray, Anthony, 
Groves and Gwynn; catchers — Tarr, 
Munyan, Gibe and Ear throw. 



Educate, organize, supervise and 
conquer carelessness. 



J. S. Kreeger 

OPTOMETRIST 
Chestertown, Maryland 

Eyes examined by a Graduate 
Optometrist - Lenses duplicated 



CHESTERTOWN RESTAURANT 
(Headquarters of Rotary Club) 
— For— 
Hungry and Thirsty Folks 




Have fun -be friendly 

Treat yourself and 

others to fresh-tasting 

Wrigley's Spearmint Gum 

The Flavor Lasts 



PAGE SIX 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



FRIDAY, MARCH 13, i 942 



Studes Cramped 
But Still Merry 
On Balto. Trip 

On the afternoon of Thursday, 
March 5, Mr. Libby, the bus driver, 
and forty-flfiven students, all "filled 
to the gills" with school spirit, clam- 
bered, pushed, crammed themselves 
Into a school bus prepratory to a 
trip to Baltimore. The idea behind 
the excursion was the desire of many 
of the students to see the Washing- 
ton-Loyola basketball game. Credit 
for the brainstorm of hiring the 
school bus goes to Dian Hubbard. 

As soon as everyone was settled — 
that is, sitting. on the seats, someone's 
lap or on the floor, Bob Corley, mas- 
ter nf ceremonies, called the roll an»l 
collected "dues". Everyone plan- 
ning to make the trip had put his 
name on a list in Mr. John's office and 
promised to pay his share of the ex- 
penses. 

The roll cheeked and money col- 
lected the trip commenced. One 
stop was made for supper and three 
hours after leaving Chestertown the 
bus arrived at Loyola. 

The game over, most of the stu- 
dents returned to the bus. Mr. Lib- 
by had disappeared. He returned in a 
few minutes, then three students were 
short. They came, but someone else 
was missing. Finally the crowd as- 
sembled and the return trip com- 
menced. 

At first there was singing and 
shouting. Gradually this noise died 
down and many of the fans went to 
sleep. Little noise was heard after 
a stop in Aberdeen until the bus stop- 
ped at Reid Hall. 

Dispite the cramped quarters every- 
one seemed to have a good time. 



DANCING? 




....FLOWERS 

ANTHONY, The Florist 

Chestertown, Md. 
Phone 283 



for . . . 
Hardware 
it's . . . 
COOPERS 



phone 14 



PITTSBURGH PAINTS 
"Smooth As Glass" 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass 
Company 

Baltimore, Maryland 



Yellow Sheets . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
tain terms, that finals should cover on- 
ly~the material after the proposed 
mid-semester tests. When asked if 
they would still oppose the indiscrim- 
inated giving of yellow sheets if these 
quizes were truly yellow sheets, three 
students answered "yes." 

In summary, the result of the ques- 
tionnaire showed the students as a 
whole to be opposed to the present 
yellow sheet system. Most favored 
weekly yellow sheets without final ex- 
aminations. 



FORD and MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

ELIASON MOTORS, INC. 

Phone 184 

Chestertown, Md. 



See 

OTIS 

For The HAIRCUT 



BE SURE TO USE BALLOT 
FOR MASCOT ON Pacf 
FOUR. 



The library of Congress at Wash- 
ington covers nearly 36 acres of space 
containing 414 miles of book shelves. 



WONG LEE 

CHINESE 

LAUNDRY 

317 Cannon St. 

Chestertown, Md. 



Read the ELM 




Patronize Our Advertisers 



WILLIAMS 

Esso Station 

Atlas Accessories 
Washing 
Lubrication 
Maple Ave. Phone 271 



CORKHILL 

FRANKS 

ARE GOOD 
ANYTIME 

Every Time! 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 

Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

George A. Bratt, Jr., President 310 E. Baltimore St. 

Phone Calvert 0284 



WioreWeasure 



There's satisfaction in knowing that 
the &/H revenue tax you pay on every 
pack of twenty cigarettes is doing its 
bit for Uncle Sam 

Every time you buy Chesterfields you get 
the satisfaction of a smoke that's definitely 

MILDER, far COOLER and BETTER-TASTING/ 

Chesterfield's superior blend of the 
world's best cigarette tobaccos will give you 
more smoking pleasure than you ever had 
before. Try a pack of Chesterfield's today. 




_ *** Pav A* 



*2 Qn ' ayA *o 
^ °0,Oo A 



/ore n an 



-SE^** 




>$ary f n 

1,300 r— """•' 



"one 
3 "«,666 



ON T 1f flTl oNS Front 



Ifs Chesterfield 



Copjnjbi !»«. Lkcitt & Mnis To* 




WILLIAM TRACY ond ELYSE 

KNOXIoChesterfield girl), star- 
ring in Hal Roach's comedy hit 
HAY FOOT. 

Our movie star* are doing a 
grand job telling defense bonds 
and entertaining our soldiers. 
Many of them choose Chester- 
field to send to men in uniform. 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 



The 




Elm 



••••• 

"V" 

••••• 



y l. XLI. No. 23. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1942 



Price Five Cents 



Mrs. Roosevelt Is Commencement Speaker 
During Co-ed Semi- Centennial C elebration 



Three Debaters 
Will Participate 
In D. C. Contest 

■ranees Goodwin, Jas. Aycock, 

Rufus Johnson To Argue 

American Issues 

Dr. Winton Tulles is planning *o 
ako Frances Goodwin, Rufus John- 
and James Aycock to Washing- 
D. C.j with him tomorrow to at- 
li; i! the National Extempore-Discus- 
Contest on Inter-American Af- 
in which the three Washington 
jollcge students will participate. 
Organized with its prime objective 
he promotion of inter-American 
■iendship and cooperation, the Ex- 
mpore-Discussion Contest has ar- 
inged this week-end for an afternoon 
nil evening program for the nine col- 
iges and universities in this district. 
iacli speaker will be requited to give 
seven minute address and the win- 
ters will represent this district in the 
'ational finals to be held May 14. 

Since hemispheric solidarity is an 
lenient vital to the security of the 
miericas," the organizers of tins con- 
I state, "participants are making, 
i a very practical sense, a collective 
[iiitribution to national defense." 
The College representatives will be 
nmewhal handicapped by lack of ex- 
act this year, since the debate 
tiiedule has been greatly curtailed. 
[owever, both Johnson and Aycock 
e veterans, and Frances Goodwin is 
e most promising of the candidates 
..in this year's freshman class. 



Mid-Term Exam Schedule 



The following schedule for 

issued from Dr. Howell's office: 

Classes meeting Tues., Thur., 
Sat., at 9, or Tues., Thur., at 
2:15 will be examined on Thurs- 
day, March 26. 

Mon., Fri., 10 or 2:15 classes 
on Friday, March 27. 

Tues., Thur., Sat., classes 
meeting at 10 on Saturday, 
March 28. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 8 and II 
classes on Monday, March 30. 

Tues., Thur., Sat., 8 and 11 
classes on Tuesday, March 31. 

Mon., Wed., FH., 9 and 1:15 
classes on Wednesday, April 1. 

Biology 22 and 24 and Edu- 
cation 12 will have special exam 
periods. 



Sale Of Tickets 
Promises Crowd 
At Junior Prom 



Dean Releases 
Y. S. Statement 



Lou Startt Supplies Music For 

Devil's Playground From 

9 To 1 At Gym 



In answer to the Student Council 
inquiry concerning yellow sheets and 
exams, the following statement has 
been issued by Dean Livingood: 

"At the March meeting of the fac- 
ulty. Monday evening, March 16, con- 
sideration was given to the request 
from Student Council for a clarifica- 
tion of policy regarding blue books, 
yellow sheets and the material to be 
covered by the proposed mid-semester 
examination and the final examina- 
tion. 

"After considerable diseussion it 
was decided that the question of the 



The main event of the week, the 
Junior Prom, held tonight from 9-1 
is expected to be a success. The sale 
of tickets is going very well. Due lo 
the change ,in the orchestra to Lou 
Startt, the price of the dance is $1.25 
also NO CORSAGES ALLOWED. By 
these changes it is hoped that the at- 
tendance will be increased. 

The guardian angels are to date 
Dr. and Mrs. Tolles and Dr. and Mrs. 
Corrington. 

The decorations are progressing 
rapidly. The main color scheme is! 
red and black, symbolic of the theme 
of the dance "hell." The black dev-j 
ils' riding on gold horns add to the lo- j 
cal color. Credit for the drawing of 
the devils goes to Molly Blackwood. 

The programs, also red and black 
and under the guidance of Dian Hub- 
bard, are very unique in their inscrip- 
tions. 

Graduation Ball Planned 
May 22; Free To Seniors 



Special Course Offered 



A four-weeks training course 
in methods of rendering mag- 
netic mines useless has been of- 
fered to several of the physics 
students by the Naval Ord- 
nance. During the 1 four weeks 
of study, which is given at. 
Massachussetts Institute of 
Technology, each student is 
paid thirty dollars weekly. 

Minimum requirements 
this course are two years 
physics. Those who received 
letters from the Naval Ord- 
nance are Robert Carter, Rob- 
ert Garrison, Robert Living- 
ston, and William Nagler. 



for 
of 



First Lady On Second Visit 

To Give Main Address 

Here On May 25 



Conlon Outlines 

g^\ >ii yv , ■ conduct of any course rested with 

s^OUnCll S J-/UT16S each individual instructor who is ex- 

j peeled to make clear the policy of 

testing for that particular class. 



The Graduation Ball, formerly the 
June Ball, will be held on May 22 
from 9-1. It will cost all, except 
Seniors who get in free, $3.00 a cou- 
ple. Those Seniors who haven't paid 
class dues won't be admitted free. It 
is strictly formal. 

President Bartolini stated that 
they were trying to get Michael 
Greene from Baltimore. His orches- 



Science Exhibit 
Plan Completed 

A science exhibit of equipment, ex- 
perimental methods, and methods of 
study in the sciences will be held 
Thursday, April 16, under the auspic- 
es of the Science Society in Dunning 
Hall. 

This exhibit will be similar to the 
one held last year, except for the fact 
that last year the society played host 
to the biology teachers of the state of 
Maryland. 

President Diacmnakos has appoint- 
ed the laboratory assistants as chair- 
men of the committees. These ar« 
Robert Cartel', physics department; 
Robert Crane, chemistry; and Maria 
Petry, biology. Members of the fac- 
ulty will act as advisors only. 



tra contains some of the players from 
the Men Abotft Town. Sarah Black- 
wood is Chairman of the decorations. 



j Whether the final examination will. 
I cover the entire course or whether the 
I test will cover only the last half of 



Maryland Legislative Officer Is 

Introduced To Students By 

Senator D. G. Roe 

j the course likewise rests with the in- 
Speaking on the comparatively new dividual instructor. 
legislative council which was created "It was voted that no instructor 
on June 1st, 1939, by the Maryland should give any tests other than the 
State Legislative, Thomas ConloUj mid-semester test during the mid-se- 
ciple speaker of the Council at.mcster period of March 26th to April 
rimrsday's assembly, outlined in con-l 1st inclusive." 
<'ise form the functions of the coun-l 



til, its accomplishments, and a few [and Governors, was the first speaker 
"f its future plans. The speaker ex- introduced by Dr. Mead. The Sena- 
plained that the council was created, tor declared, "We're in the worst war 
]o operate mainly between sessions nf in history, and our first job is to win 
'In? state assembly; and its main aim-that war, but after the war we want 
is to carry on a thorough investign- to maintain our democracy." He ad- 
ion of conditions in the entire state.jvised the student body to make a sin 
o as to better acquaint the council | cere attempt to learn "what is what ir 
with the needs of Our citizen? and government." 

immunities. In that manner theyi Senator Roe introduced the other 
be prepared to recommend neces- Senators who were present and this 
Savy legislation at the next session 'if list included; Senators Arthur 11. 
'i" legislature. iBrice, of Kent county; Wilmer Fell 

President Gilberl Mead opened the Davis, Caroline county; Walter Kirk- 
ienibly by welcom